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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
File 016
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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 016. 1987-04-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-04-17). Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11348

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 016, 1987-04-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 17, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript AIDS: A Seething Dispute for health officials to make any effort than to look back years later and say, "We wish we had done something." Des Jarlais, who studied the Amsterdam program before making a proposal for New York, said he too believes cities should distribute needles, even if there is no proof it will halt the spread of AIDS. "There would be some problems, some difficulties," he said "But we have reason to believe it's worthwhile to try." But others argue that distributing needles would do more harm than good. They say it would appear to both addicts and the public as a government sanction of illegal drug use and many legislators have said it is unfair to use tax money for such a program. Perhaps the most compelling argument against the distribution of free needles comes from the police departments ofthe cities where illegal drug use has led to significant crime and widespread social problems. In New York City, the police department has come come out strongly against the proposed pilot program, believing it would undercut the arrests of suspected drug addicts and pushers on paraphernalia charges. Drugs are bought and used, but needles remain as evidence. "It would create additional problems for drug enforcement, possibly promote drug use," spokesman Capt. Michael Julian said. "We do make more drug arrests for paraphernalia than for actual substance. "They have their reasons for support- "Our ability to predict what drug users will do is never very good, but there is a feeling that if clean needles were available they would use them" ing it," he said of the health officials who are pushing the state health commissioner to approve the pilot program. "We have our reasons for being against it." Still others question whether addicts would use sterile needles even if they were available. Surveys of several hundred drug users conducted by Des Jarlais's office in 1984 showed that an estimated 99 percent of the city's estimated 200,000 IV drug addicts are aware of the risk of AIDS transmission but only half said they tried to sterilize their needles. Mauge, who heads New York's ex- addict outreach program, said addicts repeatedly tell him they are sterilizing their needles, but said these same addicts are often seen later sharing needles rented in shooting galleries. "I don't know, if needles were available, if they would change their habits because it is habit," Mouge said. "Even if they had a fresh needle they might still shoot up with three or four people because that's how it's done." However, in the 36 states that allow needles to be purchased openly, addicts usually don't share their equipment, he said. "You look at New Orleans, where the addicts have the same profile, the same types, and HIV infection is 1 percent compared to here where in some areas it's probably 50 percent," he said. "In New Orleans they go to Woolworths, buy a needle and shoot at home." In New Jersey, where needle purchases are illegal, 62 percent of the state's 1,901 AIDS cases are related to IV drug use. Mouge said states with high numbers of intravenous drug users usually have passed laws making possession of needles illegal in an attempt to make drug use less accessible and to to give police a reason to arrest suspected drug users. "So here they go to galleries," said Mouge, who generally supports a needle exchange program. "I do believe we might reduce a portion of AIDS," he said. In cities where needles are illegal, addicts buy them from corrupt pharmacies and hospital storerooms, Des Jarlais said. "They are passed around simply because there aren't enough available for everyone." Des Jarlais said needles can be sterilized by boiling them in water for more than 15 minutes or soaking them in bleach for a similar time period. He said he believes users want to sterilize their needles, but often times don't have the facilities or presence of mind to do so. "If given a choice, they'll choose a clean needle," he said. "I can't believe our drug users are not as shrewd as APRIL 17, 1987 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 those in Holland." Des Jarlais also said European health officials have told him needle distribution programs allow them to keep tabs on addicts and give them an opportunity to try to rehabilitate them. "It's an excellent way to get access and build up trust," he said. While the debate is continuing, it appears most American health and legislative officials have decided against needle distribution programs and are not likely to change their minds unless new evidence emerges. AUTOMOTIVE SPRING SPECIAL Air Conditioning Check & Charge 26.95 Oil & Lube 24.95 Cooling System Service 27.95 1411 Taft I 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice Crab Lice Study qt Baylor College of Medicine Department of Dermatology is conducting a study of a new crab lice treatment. Volunteers may be male or female, between 18-65 years old, and diagnosed as having crab lice within the last 24 hours. Volunteers will be compensated. Call 799-6137. *_£ 3P Help Us Celebrate Our First Anniversary at THE The mm, Home of itl?f Country Sunday-April 26,1987 $1 Longnecks and Well Drinks Music from your DJ Jim Lambert Free Drinks Compliments of Betsy and Becky 2:00-4:00pm (713) 666-3464 9150 S. Main
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