Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
File 012
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 012. 1987-04-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11344.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-04-17). Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11344

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 012, 1987-04-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11344.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 17, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript APRIL 17, 1987/MONTROSE VOICE 11 Poll: Americans Support Premarital AIDS Testing WASHINGTON (UPI)—Nearly four out of five Americans believe couples planning to marry should be tested for AIDS, a poll said Saturday, but more than half of respondents said they had not changed their behavior to guard against AIDS. The CNN-U.S. News & World Report poll, conducted by The Roper Organization, also found that a majority of Americans believe the government should pay for treatment of AIDS patients with a new drug found to help sufferers cope with the deadly illness. The survey of 1,017 people, conducted at the end of March, asked whether testing for the AIDS virus should be required for various groups. Seventy-seven percent said couples planning marriage should take the blood test, and 74 percent of respondents favored testing of people entering hospitals. Seventy-four percent favored testing immigrants, and 71 percent favored testing persons entering the armed services. Only those entering the armed services currently are required to have an AIDS blood test taken. Only 7 percent ofthe respondents said they themselves had had a test to determine whether they carry the AIDS virus, but 43 percent said they had changed their behavior in some way to reduce their exposure to AIDS. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome is a viral disease that breaks down the body's immune system, leaving a person susceptible to a variety of illnesses, including pneumonia and cancer. As of March 30, the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta reported 33,482 cases of AIDS in the United States, of which 19,394 victims have died. Researchers say AIDS is transmitted primarily by sexual contact and the sharing of intravenous needles. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop has recommended that people who are sexually active but not involved in a faithful monogamous relationship should use condoms to prevent possible transmission of the virus that causes AIDS. But the CNN-U.S. News poll said 53 percent of respondents said they had not changed their sexual behavior at all' as a result of the epidemic the same number that said they were "not at all worried" about getting AIDS. Only 10 percent said they were very worried about contracting the disease. More than half of the respondents— 59 percent—also said they thought the government should pay for the expensive new drug, AZT, shown to prolong the life of AIDS patients if the victim could not afford it. Almost all respondents said people who have the AIDS virus should inform their sexual partners. Ninety-five percent said spouses should be informed and 94 percent said anyone with whom the person has sex should be informed. Only 43 percent thought people who carry the virus, but who do not actually have the disease, should inform their health insurance company. Fifty-seven percent said such people should stop having sex entirely. Eighty-two percent of the respondents said newspaper obituaries should not mention that a person died of AIDS if the victim's family objects. The poll's margin of error was 4 percent. FEIFFER AijOffiTnem, fax nxt \m\itt6r v m ID " W£n„ W)0P A UlLUOij pme,Homg- <SIUC fe>85iveMv<tW_ IS-mTWIHMX&Z&T? Inmate Claims to Have Arranged 'Personals' Killing KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (UPI)—An Oklahoma prison inmate claims he arranged from his prison cell to have a Blount County man killed last year in what authorities said April 10 is a "bizarre" scenario. The claims of David Paul Hammer, 28, an inmate at the state prison in Mc A- lester, Okla., are being taken seriously, Blount County District Attorney David Ballard said. Hammer said he never met the victim in person, but made contact with him through the Los Angeles-based magazine The Advocate. "He (Hammer) says he set the thing up. It appears that he may have done that," Ballard said April 10, "This guy gets very vague sometimes. He's very difflicult to deal with at times." "It's really all bizarre," Ballard said. Detectives traveled to Oklahoma in December to intervew Hammer, who claims he set up the Nov. 23, 1986, killing of Kenneth Kenner, 39, of Louis ville, Tenn. Kenner was found beaten to death Nov. 24 at his apartment in the Blount County community near Alcoa, Tenn. No arrests have been made. Hammer is serving a total of 1,200 years on 13 felony convictions in Oklahoma. He told The Knoxville News- Sentinel in a telephone interview from his cell he arranged to have a former cellmate rob and kill Kenner. Hammer said he corresponds with people through The Advocate, getting them to send him money. He claims to have netted over $50,000 through the setup last year. Hammer said Kenner did not realize he was in prison. He said he uses part of the money he gets for a telephone answering service, so people with whom he corresponds will not know he is behind bars. Hammer said his correspondence with Kenner led him to believe the Tennessee man had money, so he decided to hire someone to rob him. He said he contacted a former cellmate and told the man to rob Kenner and "to leave no witnesses." Hammer claims the former cellmate killed Kenner by beating him over the head with a roofing axe. "I told him to kill the guy," Hammer told The News-Sentinel. The inmate said he telephoned the Kenner residence the day of and day after the killing. He said he talked with his ex-cellmate the first time, who told him Kenner was dead. Ballard said the second call tipped off authorities because County Detective Kenneth Myers answered the phone. Authorities then found letters from Hammer when they searched Kenner's home. Ballard said authorities are searching for Hammer's former cellmate. "We also are looking into the possibility of charging Hammer, seeing if we can charge him and bring him back to Tennessee," Ballard said.
File Name uhlib_22329406_n338_011_ac.jpg