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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 001. 1987-04-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11333.

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(1987-04-17). Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11333

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 001, 1987-04-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11333.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 17, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HOME DELIVERY? ADVERTISING? Call (713) 529-8490 montrose Welcome Softball Pl~ers It's Annual Lone Star Classic Time HOUSTON WEEKEND WEATHER: Fair and mild at night, ~ ,, f' ~ a" a~"] --AP- RIL- 17-1.98- 7 - 18-8U-E 33-8 - - ! ~ jJ a a '--lo_wn _ear-62._wa_rm_ and-hot-day_. sh-igh-nea_9r _. 0P_lay-ball___,! New Clue to Why AIDS Develops in Some People Late Developments, inside 'Campus Man' Goes Beneath the Flesh Bill O'Rourke, inside Now it's Swaggert in the Spotlight Alleged Kickbacks and Murder Threats News, inside Addicts, Needles and AIDS: A Seething Dispute News, inside I BEGINNING NEXT FRIDAY: ·[]J~[iJ E3~~[iJ, ONLY IN THE MONTROSE VOICE 2 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 Tantnty Bakker Tells How to Keep a Husband Happy makeup, dress in bold colors and wear wigs. She had to be talked outofa bright red dress she wanted to wear to her own wedding. She said her clothes and jewelry do not cost as much as critics have sug­gested because she shops carefully. In fact, she said, shopping is how she deals with life's problems. FORT MILL, S.C. (UPl)-Tammy Faye Bakker, whose evangelist husband Jim Bakker fell from grace in a sex scandal, says the way to keep a husband happy is to flirt with him, wear plenty of makeup and be unpredictable. That advice appears in a book called "Christian Wives-Women Behind the Evangelists Reveal Their Faith in Mod­em Marriage." The book is due out next month from Doubleday. "You don't have to be dowdy to be a Christian," she said. Her husband never knows what to expect from her and that is the reason their sometimes rocky marriage has lasted for 26 years, Tammy Bakker said in the book. "I like to be different people for my husband," she said. "I wear different wigs all the time. Jim never knows if I'm going to be a redhead, a blonde or a brunette-I like to keep him guessing." She tells critics of her heavy makeup to mind their own business. "I don't care as long as I'm not offend­ing God," she said. "I want to do as much for myself as I can and it's not for them, it's for my husband. I have a right to do what I want." The Bakkers and their marriage have been scrutinized in recent weeks since Jim" Bakker resigned as chairman of the PTL, an television evangelism network, and admitted to a one-time sexual encounter seven 'years ago with a church secretary. Subsequently, the ex-wife of country singer Gary Paxton told a newspaper the evangelist strayed because he was jealous over Tammy Bakker's infatua­tion with Paxton. Tammy Bakker traces her love for makeup to age 12, when she had a part Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose Judge Denies Danburg's Request for a Continuance A Houston judge has approved the start of trial for a Catholic priest accused of sexually assaulting a 9-year-old boy. District Judge Albert Pruett denied a motion Wednesday to delay the start of trial for Donald Stavinoha, 43. The request was based on the fact that one of Stavinoha's attorneys is state Rep. Debra Dan burg, who is in Austin forthe legislative session Dan burg has been accused of hiring herself out as a minor attorney and then using her position as a state representa­tive to gain delays in trials for the clients. State law allows legislators who are attorneys to delay trial of their cases until 30 days after the Legislature adjourns. Pruett ordered Stavinoha's trial to begin as scheduled Tuesday. The priest was arrested last May when police say they found him in a van engaging in a sexual act with the boy. Prosecutor Jon Munier testified at the Wednesday hearing that he has had no contact with Danburg concerning the case, and that his dealings have been with Stavinoha's lead attorney, Edward Mallett. Danburg's district includes much of Montrose and a portion of the Heights. in a school performance of "Okla­homa." The musical-and other things she liked-were frowned upon by the Pentecostal church she attended so she stopped going to church, according to the book. accepted an al tar call and confessed her sins. The emotion of the moment appar­ently got out of hand and hours later­after everyone else had left-her mother was summoned to remove her from the altar and take her home. "When I'm shopping, I don't think about the bills at PTL," she said. "There's times I just have to quit think­ing and the only way I can quit thinking is by shopping." But a sch.oolmate eventually invited her to a revival, during which she She attended church from that time on, but she also continued to wear her We're Houston's largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice. We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewhere around $6,000,000 weekly on the thin~s we buy-clothes, partying at night, apartments, cars and repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. (Yes, that's S6 million weekly.) Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask-by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 for ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY HeH's how we l19urecl the figures Oasc d1slnbu11on 10 ooo cop•es Friday f5000 COP•H Tuesday lemporanly suspended) Assumed pus on .. rale factor 2 8 Tnus es11ma1~ s~~~~s~::~g~o:v:,~~~!>~ :.~l~~~e~:::l~~~!!:tl+~:I~ ·::~:ae ~~.~;eooge:e';~1~g us SPends THESE FIGURES HAVE BEEN ADJUSTED FROM EARLIER PUBLISHED FIGURES WHICH HAO ALSO REFLECTED THE TUESDAY EDITION THESE FIGURES REFLECT ONLY THE FRIDAY EDITION APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Gay Play Broadcast Led to Decision FCC Tightens Obscenity Rules Spaces Available to rent for the Westheimer Art Festival By Sydney Shaw WASHINGTON (UPI)-The govern­ment warned broadcasters Thursday of a new crackdown on language that goes beyond the famous "seven dirty words" and promised stricter enforcement of bans on the airing of offensive material. The Federal Communications Com­mission ruled that television and radio stations will have to adhere to narrower standards of what can be permissibly aired, primarily on the content of the material and the time of the broadcast. In the last decade, the FCC said, broadcasters have relaxed definitions of what is offensive material, using almost exclusively the "seven dirty words" as a yardstick. But the FCC said it now will return to app1ying "the generic definition of inde­cency," defined as "language or mate­rial that depicts or describes, in terms patently offensive as measured by con­temporary community standards for the broadcast medium, sexual or excre­tory activities or organs." That definition came from the FCC's 1975 Pacifica decision, upheld by the Supreme Court in 1978, in which the "seven dirty words" were ruled to be obscene material not suitable for broad­cast. Thursday's FCC decision will apply to American radio and television sta­tions. Officials said violaters would be subject to fines and the ultimate penalty in the broadcasting industry loss of licenses. "What we are doing here today is to correct an altogether too narrow inter­pretation of decency," said FCC Com­missioner Dennis Patrick, expected to take over from Mark Fowler as cha ir­man of the agency next week. Fowler said, "Is this the way we want to entertain and inform and inspire peo­ple in the audience? Is this a legacy you, the broadcasters, want to foster, per­serve and bequeath?" Several commissioners emphasized the policy will not chill free speach, not­ing that obscene speech is not protected by the First Amendment. The FCC action arose specifically from complaints against radio stations WYSP-FM in Philadelphia, and the non-commercial stations KCSB-FM in Santa Barbara, Calif., and KPFK-FM in Los Angeles. WYSP carries a morning program by "shock radio" personality Howard Stern, based at WXRX-FM in New York. KCSB, a student station at the Univer­sity of California-Santa Barbara, aired what the FCC called an "indecent broadcast" after 10 p.m., raising con- BETTER LAUJilS & qARDEilS Total lawn maintenance Commercial~ Residential • Landscape • Trash Removal • Chimne4 Sweep • Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN cerns that children still awake at that hour heard the broadcast. KPFK, owned by the Pacifica Foundation-the organization involved in the Supreme Court case-aired excerpts of a sexually explicit gay play, "Jerker," in August 1986. The FCC voted to send warning let­ters to the stations in question and then reaffirmed the stricter policing of broad­casts for possibly offensive material. The case involving the broadcast of "Jerker" also will be referred to the Jus­tice Department for further investiga­tion, the commission said Stern was not immediately available for comment, but his management representative, Don Buchwald, said of the FCC decision: "Howard has always functioned within the letter of the law and will continue to do so. If the law is in violation of the First Amendment, the broadcasters will challenge it." The Pacifica ruling arose from the 1973 airing by Pacifica-owned WBAI­FM of a recording by comedian George Carlin that included the "seven dirty words," which describe bodily func­tions, parts of the anatomy, sexual acts and incest. April 25-26 Both in our Parking Lot and in our "Out Back'' Contact: George or Pickles 527-9669 Welcome Sollball Plage,, Enioy Yourself in Houston ••• and Play Safe. Want to visit J.0.E. while vou're here? Just present an out-of-tity ID and tell us you're here for the Lone Star Classie and you can receive a temporary 3~ay membership and pass. J.0.E's ADMISSION TIMES: 11pm-1am Friday & Saturday; 6-9pm Sunday; 8-9pm Tuesday & Thursday (NEW HOURS START APRIL 24: admission times 8-9pm Tues., Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.) Whit Is J.O.E.? It is a private organization of out-of-lfie~loset ~d~lt gay men who are in re~sona~le condition ~or their body type. Although the lines are not concrete, age and weight restrictions apPly. But mental attitude 1s even more important. J.0.E. meets at the COTTAGE PLAYHOUSE - 611 PACIFIC look For the Play Safe Flag 4 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 200 Attend Opening of Straight 'AIDS-Free' Dating Service By Peg Byron NEW YORK (UPI)-About 200 people packed an opening night party Wednes­day at a dating service for people who have tested "AIDS-negative," although legal and medical experts charged that the club is dangerous and possibly ille­gal. The dating service, the first in an area where more people have AIDS than anywhere in the nation, invited singles to sign up for membership cards if they take the blood test for the AIDS antib­ody and are negative, meaning they show no signs of AIDS virus infection. An equal number of men and women made up the crowd of 200 people who jammed into the opening night party at the Ampersand Singles Club's head­quarters on New York's fashionable Upper East Side. Founder Gail Sheffler hired security guards to keep the affair orderly. "I came because I think it's the begin­ning of the future," said Elissa Sandler of Brooklyn. "It's difficult to go into a singles club to try to meet someone and not know if they are AIDS free. "It's a life and death issue," she said. "It's not like herpes. I was thinking of making all my dates take a blood test, but it takes six weeks to get the results." She was among several party-goers who said the club is an idea whose time had come. "Hey, I just want to play it safe," said a well-dressed man in his 30s. Some people were skeptical. One man wanted to know what happened if a club member had sex shortly after being tested and contracted AIDS. Gail Sheffler, 27, quit her job as an advertising copywriter to start the AIDS-free dating service which is Bakker-Hahn Room a Hot Item CLEARWATER BEACH, Fla. (UPI)­There's a new tourist attraction in town-room No. 538 of the Sheraton Sand Key Hotel where evengelist Jim Bakker and Jessica Hahn had their fateful tryst. The room goes for $138 a night and hotel manager Russ Kimball says he has been swamped with requests from people who want to stay in it or buy furnishings from it. Souvenir hunters are out ofluck, Kim­ball said, because the bedspread, cur­tains, beds and even the carpeting were replaced during remodeling. Kimball said the room, with two dou­ble beds, is booked for the next three weekends. "It sells so good I'm thinking about putting 538 on every room on the fifth floor," he said. Kimball said one radio station wanted to do a broadcast from the room. "I had to tell them I was sorry but the room was booked," he said. He said the hotel continues to receive two or three telephone calls daily from radio disc jockeys around the country. He said some want hotel workers to talk about the room, while others wants to talk to guests currently in the room. Kimball said the hotel hosted a con­vention earlier this month and the con­ventioneer who got the room happened to be named Baker, "so the radio sta­tions called and they got Mr. Baker." Bakker's sexual encounter with Hahn in the room led to his recent downfall as head of the PTL Club. aimed at addressing awkwardness and uncertainty she says have invaded the New York singles scene. "I'm single. I'm living in New York and I'm concerned," said the energetic, dark-haired entrepreneur as the tele­phones in her new brownstone office jangled incessently. "I haven't sat down at a dinner party in the last two months where the talk hasn't been abut AIDS. And there is nothing oriented to heterosexuals," she said. But while Sheffler juggled scores of inquiries and prepared for her first party for prospective members, some legal and medical experts ridiculed her approach as dangerous and possibly illegal. Members will pay up to $600 to meet people of the opposite sex who also carry "AIDS-negative" cards. Members also have to pay for their own blood tests, costing between $55 and $250 from pri­vate physicians if not taken at one of the city's free clinics, Sheffler said. "It is not paranoia" for heterosexuals to be concerned about AIDS, said nurse clinician Ann Stuart of the New York Blood Center where she counsels people who t!.ke the AIDS antibody test. The Blood Center estimates between 4 percent to IO percent of New York hete­rosexuals carry the AIDS virus, she said. But Stuart warned it can take several months for a virus infection to create antibodies that show up on the test and post-test sexual relations could also cause infection. But Sheffler said that her club does not guarantee its member are AIDS free. "We work with the best the medical community has to offer," she said. "There are no guarantees. But members are meeting other people who have been tested AIDS negative and chances are more than likely that these people are AIDS negative. What are your other choices?" Sheffler said that besides the usual dating questionnaires and photos, her club will offer AIDS information and even a "safe-sex video" that recom­mends using condoms. An opening night party of 300 was expected to draw an even larger crowd of prospective members and Sheffler hired security guards to help keep things orderly. But the Human Rights Commission said it would investigate the group for possible violations of city antidiscrimi­nation law. "It's OK to ask if you like blondes," said commission attorney Mitchell Karp. "But it's not OK if (a negative AIDS test) becomes a precondition for participating" if the club is covered by the city's public accommodation protec­tions. Karp added, "This sounds like just a way for men to say, 'It's OK, baby. I don't need a condom."' Scientists believe the AIDS virus is transmitted through infected semen, vaginal fluids and blood and the U.S. Surgeon General has recommended sex­ually active people use condoms to pre­vent exposure. Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. Activity Center Meeting Postponed The April 10 public meeting of the Montrose Activity Center has been temporarily postponed. A draft lease has been received for the building at 1110 Lovett Blvd., but the guarantor's issue is still a small problem The date of the next meeting will be announced as soon as possible. .. Teen Group Forming Four meetings have been tentatively scheduled for a new group for gay and lesbians ages 15-18. The group hopes to address the issues facing gay teenagers For more information, call the Gay and Lesbian Switchboard at 529-3211 Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Montrose & Community Groups .. MSA Volleyball Returns Montrose Sports Association volleyball will return for the summer season on Sunday, May 3. beg1nn1ng at 3 00 pm. Once again, play will be held at Wilson Elementary, Fairview and Yupon. Anyone. male or female, is invited to play and free refreshments will be served. Prior experience 1s not necessary. .. Bacchus I Wins Winter Pool League Second-place Mary's II defeated Bacchus I 8-7 Wednesday but the margin of victory was not enough to knock Bacchus out of the first place spot in the standings Going into Wednesday's final night of play for the winter season of the M.S.A. Billiards League. Lipstick was number three. (Results of the other games and the effect on the final standings were not immediately available.) The league awards party will be held May 17 at Bacchus For more information on the upcoming summer season, call Roger Pruett at 869-6108. The Viet Nam Restaurant and Andy presents the Finest Food in town at the Best Prices Open: 11am-10pm Sun., 11am­midnight M-F, 11am-2am Sat. 3215 Main at Elgin 526-0917 MILITARY FASHIONS FRENCH"* GERMAN "' ITALIAN * wwn VINTAGE * COME .1f@fl~ THE FASHION ARMY AT ..... ~~ l(L~v~e INTERNATIONAL MILITARY SURPLUS HDQRS. MON··SAT 11 ·6 1n3WAUGM CIA. HOJST()Ml,1(U$f1'11» 528-2111 HOUSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SERGIU COMISSIONA MUSIC DIRECTOR Houston Symphonr:- Exxon Pops •·@•n@:m~1~.ntm@• The Music of Richard Rogers Newton Wayland, Conducting Janict Grisson, Soprano Jason Smith, Tenor Richard Fink, Baritone Houston Symphony Chorus, Charles Hausmann. Director music from South Pacific. Th• King and I, State Fair, Carousel. Oklahoma!. and Morel Fri .. Apr. 17, B p.m. Sat., Apr. 1 B. B p.m. Music Hall CALL 227-ARTS Tieken stolrt oll Sb 00 Cholrqe 11ckr1 by phone or buy ttcktU <111 rhe Houhon Ttckt1 Center_ fower·ltvtl Jones Holll or at T1cketron outltu 1n ,1111 Folry s stores C<"<C:O";:'T~~~~!AL ....... _ ..... . ,, .......... ,()o.t •. - . Kickbacks in Swaggert's Closet? BATON ROUGE, La (UPI)-A former employee of the J immy Swaggart World Ministries has admitted receiving what he considered hush money from the tele­vision evangelist to keep quiet about what he believed to be printing contract overcharges and kickbacks, a television station has reported. The allegations of a payoff were made by Howard "Bud" Fisher, the former director of direct mail for the Swaggart ministry, in a 30-minute documentary on the television preacher aired Mon­day night by WBRZ-TV in Baton Rouge. Fisher said in late 1982 and 1983 he tried to alert Swaggart and his wife Frances to what he believed to be print­ing contract overcharges by printing broker Rod Dockery of Dallas and gifts, rewards and other favors made by Dockery's company to Bob Anderson, the brother of Frances Swaggart and vice president of the ministries. About 10 minutes into one meeting with Swaggart, Fisher said he was given a $5,000 handwritten check, des­cribed by his boss as a bonus. Fisher said he considered it a payment to keep quiet about the printing contract. Fisher said the check was fo llowed by a series of pay raises that increased his salary within months from $60,000 a year to $100,000 a year. However, he was at the same time stripped of any authority and resigned his position. The television documentary also said Anderson's name was included in infor­mation being gathered by New York attorney Bob Grutman, who represents fallen PTL leader Jim Bakker and his wife Tammy. In defending Bakker in a scandal involving a sexual encounter with a former church secretary, Grutman threatened two weeks ago to "show there is a smellier laundry in his (Swag­gart's) hamper than the laundry that he thought was in Rev. Bakker's." WBRZ said Grutman also cmpiled information about another incident in which a former Swaggart employee was fired following an alleged sexual affair with a member of Swaggart's inner cir­cle. That incident, the television station said, resulted in a lawsuit when Swag­gart tried to evict the fired employee from a home he bought from the minis­try. A settlement was reached, the tele­vision station said, and the employee was allowed to sell the home and repay the balance of the due mortgage. The settlement, the television report said, involved a confidentiality agree­ment in which the parties agreed not to disclose details of the incident that led to the suit. "I have not sued anyone," Swaggart said. "I don't know what they're talking about there." Swaggart Official Denies Newspaper's Claims NEW ORLEANS (UPI)-A lawyer for television evangelist Jimmy Swaggart denied Thursday a newspaper's allega­tions that the Baton Rouge preacher twice threatened to kill a longtime member of his ministry's band. William Treeby, a lawyer for Swag­gart and assistant secretary for Jimmy Swaggart Ministries, said a report based on court records and published in Wednesday's edition of The Times­Picayune "relied on unproven allega­tions in lawsuits." Treeby said a telegram from a lawyer represel)ting musician Dwayne John­son was delivered to the newspaper Thursday. The telegram, Treeby said, indicated J oh nson apologized to Swag­gart for filing a lawsuit in 1982. "Dwayne is sorry that he filed that suit and has apologized to Brother Jimmy Swaggart," Tree by said the tele­gram stated. The article, based on records con­tained in the lawsuit filed by Johnson and his wife, reported Swaggart became enraged at the man and threatened to kill him on two ocassions. Sources who alleged1y heard Swag­gart speak about the matter told the paper the preacher had learned of a rela­tionship between the band member and the wife of a member of Swaggart's inner circle. ' The article also reported Swaggart representatives pressured a Texas woman to turn over her estate to Jimmy Swaggart Ministries, according to law­suits filed by the woman's family and executor. Treeby's statement said those allega­tions concerning the estate of Zoe Vance "were not true" and matters involving the woman's estate "are private mat ters." The Times-Picayune reported that a 1986 settlement of the case allocated 70 percent of the estate to Jimmy Swag­gart Ministries and 30 percent to a foun­dation named for the woman's son. Treeby's statement confirmed that disposition of the case. montrose VOICE HOUSTON, TEXAS ISSUE 338 FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 1987 Published weekly Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1987 Office hours: 8am-6pm Henry McClurg •publ1sher-ed1tor Linda Wyche1managmg editor David Roumfort 'production SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland1advert1smg director Ken Boge'account executive POSTMASTER Send address corrections 10 408 Avon­dale, Houston. TX 77006-3028 SubScflpt1on rate in US (by Voice camer or US Mail) $1 25 per week (up lo 2 issues}. $65 per year (52weeks) . or $32 50 per six months (26 weeks) National advertising representative -R1vendell Marketing. P 0 Box 1268. Plainfield . NJ 07061 , (201) 754·4348 Fmsl advertising dead/me All display ads Spm 2 days pnor lo publtca11on date All classified ads2pm 1 day pnor to publ1cauon date Notice lo advertisers· Advert1s1ng rate schedule E1ght·A was effective Apnl 11. 1986 R1Mpons1b1/1ty · We do not assume financial respons1b111ty for claims by advertisers but readers are asked to advise the newspaper of any susp1cK>n of fradulent or deceptive advertising and suspicions will be investigated News service. United Press International APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 2517 Ralph Street at Westheimer 527-9071 Sunday Beer Buse 1-9pm Burgers SI Tuesday Pool Tournamem 8pm Friday Beer Buse 4-10pm Hamburgers SI Wednesday Liquor Buse 9pm-midnighe S6 all you can hold Saturday Liquor Buse 4-7pm S6 All You Can Hold Thursday Buck Night SI Well, long necks & schnapps ~. · t( It's Springtime again and time to do I J. ~~ 11 . -t-ho-se-p-ro-~e-cts-y~_:_~~-e -b-ee_n_p-utti-·n_g_o_iff._ L _HSK CONTRACTING Ir\ ~ A Full Service Contractor •Roofing (All Types) • Tree & Trash Remoool • Remodeling • Insulation • Sheetrock/ Painting • Tile/ Masonry • Plumbing/ Bectrical • Cabinets • Foundations Repaired • Decks/ Hot Tubs No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 Or Emergency Pager 891-4053 Another D~ S~.4 Enterprise ... K.J. 's ~~ NORTHSIDE Mon-Fri Happy Hour 12-7pm s1so Well & 51 Beer Friday-Fantasy in Motion 10:30pm Saturday-Cash Drawing SUNDAY Lip Synch Contest 10pm, Anyone Can Enter, Cash Prizes MONDAY Airline Night-s1 Bar Drinks and Beer for Airline Employees Tuesday-Pool Tournament 8pm $4 Entry Fee Wednesday-All Night Happy Hour s1so Well & s1 Draft WELCOME KIEDREN (FORMERLY OF CHEERS) TO OUR STAFF Come by and see our New Look! 11830 AIRLINE-445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldine-Bender) 6 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 ( 713) or (214) 976-4242 A telephone service that offers you an opportunity t.o meet other interesting men just like yourself. Explore your most outrageous fantasies or just listen in. Our conference calls are hot, live, and totally uninhibited. Call ( 713) 976-4242 and hook up with as many as 8 hunky Texas guys now! in -------- Dallas! You must be 18 years of age to call. A service charge of $2 +tolls, if any, billed discreetly to your phone bill. Quarantines Should Be Few, Says Health Chairman SAN ANTONIO (UPI)- Education is the most important tool for stemming AIDS, but quarantines should be used in rare cases where known carriers of the deadly disease continue to be sexu­ally promiscuous, the new chairman of the state Health Board said. Dr. Frank Bryant of San Antonio, who was appointed chairman this past, said Tuesday the board was considering moving against only six people in Texas when it considered adopting such a rule 18 months ago. The board adopted the rule, but then recanted its decision in January 1986 after receiving numerous protests. "We would have said this about any person with syphillis, turberculosis or gonorrhea-any communicable dis­ease. What else would you do," said Bry­ant, who added he was only voicing his own opinions and not those of the board. Bryant said that unless a vaccine can be found for acquired immune defi­ciency syndrome, which can be sexually transmitted, the focus must be on "edu­cation of the public about how one con­tracts the disease and how to go about avoiding it." Bryant, an immediate past president of the Bexar County Medical Society, had served one six-year term on the state board and recently was appointed for a second term. Taylor Disagrees with Reagan 'People' by William C. Trott United Press International President Reagan says abstinence is the best way to beat AIDS but AIDS fighter Elizabeth Taylor doesn't think much of his cure. "Can this be considered realistic when you realize that every year mil­lions of teenagers become pregnant?" she said in an interview with the West German magazine Der Spiegel. "His advice really is not very sensible. It reglly is amazing how our president confronts this national catastrophe." Taylor urged young people to keep in mind that AIDS has ended the era of sexual freedom. "This jumping from bed to bed, hav­ing this or that partner that you picked up in a bar, really has become playing with fire," she said. Taylor is chairwoman of the Ameri­can Foundation for AIDS research. OD O SPEAKING OF VANNA: For those who can't get enough of Vanna White, the game show queen's book, "Vanna Speaks," will be out soon. In the mean­time, the May issue of Ladies Home Journal has an excerpt in which she says she got her "Wheel of Fortune" job because "I turned the letters better than anyone else and because Pat (Sajack, the show's host) and I made a cute cou­ple, with sort of a brother-and-sister look." The "Wheel" job came in 1982 at a point where her Hollywood career had not been going well. At one point, she considered posing nude for Playboy but decided she couldn't go through with it. In the book White also talks about how she unsuccessfully tried to talk Playboy's Hugh Hefner out of publish­ing pictures of her lingerie. DEALING WITH A DRUG OR ALCOHOL PROBLEM IS HARD ENOUGH WITHOUT HAVINGm DEAL WITH HOMOPHOBIA, TOO. 1-800-54-PRIDE 24 HOURS-A-DAY It takes a lot of courage to admit to a drug or alcohol problem. And once you've decided to deal with it, the last thing you need is someone passing judgment on your lifestyle. That's where we come in. We're Pride Institute, America's first in-patient drug and alcohol treatment facility run by and for lesbians and gay men. We offer a safe, confidential environment where you'll find the support, understanding and respect to effectively treat your chemical dependency. Our professional staff will do more than help you overcome your problem, they'll help you live your life with Pride. If you, or someone you care about has a problem with drugs or alcohol, give us a call. 1-800-54-PRIDE. Help is available 24 hours-a-day. VPRIDE INSflTUTE Recover with pride. APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Jin ~nwriam FRED KELLY Fred Kelly, 46, died April 10, 1987 after an extended illness. He was born in Walla Walla, Washington on Jan. 4, 1941 and moved to Houston in 1981 . Fred graduated from Eastern Oregon College in La Grande, Oregon. He was a dedicated school teacher, loved and respected by many. Fred attended MCCR and Unity churches in Houston. . He is survived by two sons and a daughter Irving in California; his mother. four sisters and a brother, all living in Wasington and Oregon, and many friends who loved him and will miss him greatly. Graveside services were held in Milton Freewater, Oregon on Tuesday, April 14 1m · "To every th ing there is a season. and a time to every purpose under the heaven: a time to be born, and a time to die ... "­Ecclesiastes 3:1-2 MELVIN ARD, JR. August 22, 1955-April 11 , 1987 MeMn Ard, Jr., departed this life Saturday, April 11 , 1987 at Northeast Baptist Hospital in San Antonio, Texas, from AIDS-related conditions. Melvin first moved to Houston in the late sixties. He was known as "Rare Earth" by the other flower children. Known and loved by both the prominent and the penniless, "Mel" with his trademark long blonde hair falling over one eye, frequented Montrose area clubs during the seventies. A member of Poets Workshop, he published Suns­prout magazine. Respected as a hard working and honora­ble young man, Mel is mourned by his many Houston and San Antonio friends, and his wife, Irene Ard. OUR POLICY The Montrose Voice •S honored to commemorate the lives of oor readers. and fnends or reiatrves of our readers_ with an announcement We ask I hat lr1ends or relatrves provide us with 1nfor­matt0n rn J)ef'S()n (not by mail or over the phone) There is no charge for this service CREffiATIOn SERVICE mTERnATlOnAL' Op. ,Ind by m~ H Murp · y Fun-.ra1 Homes Direct Burial or Cremation $395 (Jf t.::t·®. 692-5555 8 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 Welcome All Lone Star Classic Softball Players Montrose Voice Dallas Steele and Chicago M.SA. Invite You' All to MARY'S THE NATIONAL BAR OF TEXAS 1022 WESTHEIMER for a Party and Food After the Games SA!rUBDAY Beginning Spm TILL THE FOOD RUNS OUT Letters to the Voice From t h e R eaders of t he Montrose Voice ~ Thanking Jim & Moody Names withheld by request Last year we called J&M Lawn Care, 1609 Welch, Houston, TX 77006 to do our lawn on a regular basis. Needless to say they were always on time and d id a wonderful job. However, my lover had been down with AIDS and financially we could not pay the bill and were two months behind. After I talked with them, they told me to tear up the bi ll and they would continue to do our yard for free as long as was necessary. Since that time they have not only done the yard but brought us plants and bushes, which in my lovers last days are wonderful. He no longer is able to walk, but can see out of the windows. I must admit that the flowers and roses are beautiful. Monetarily we can do nothing for the wonderful people at J&M. But I and my lover feel that some measure of recognition is due Jim and Moody for their contributions in one form or another. If there is anything you can do to bring these people and their charity to the public, I and my lover would greatly appreciate it. ~ Thanks, Houston! From Brent Nicholson Earle, Marion Nicholson and Bl/I Konkoy I write to express our gratitude to the Houston gay and lesbian community for their reception of The American Run for the End of AIDS during our visit here this past week. We are especially grateful to the board, staff and volunteers of the Houston AIDS Foundation for their sponsorship of the Run and for enabling us to meet so many members of the community in the bars, at chu rch services, at local bsinesses, at our beautiful reception at the Magnolia Room and, especially, at Omega House, McAdory House and Jefferson Davis Memorial Hospital. Your community is blessed with saints without whose work and dedication we would all be diminished. It has been our privi lege to meet many of them and to lend support to their efforts. We urge the readership of the Montrose Voice to conti nue supporting them and their vitally important labors. We all have a job to do in this crisis. We have six-and-a-half months longer to t ravel and many more cities to visit and people to meet. We'll take with us memories of your hospitality, generosity and encouragement to ease our journey Please accept our gratitude and respect in return. ~Stone Soup Grant From Donald L. Sk1pw1th, chair of board AIDS Foundation Houston, to John Glines, Stamp Out AIDS Project On behalf of over 350 clients of AFH, I want to thank you for the grant from the National AIDS Network/ Stamp Out AIDS Fund to AIDS Foundation Houston in the amount of $1,000. This grant money ha~ been specifically earmarked to purchase a commercial refrigerator to store fruits. vegetables. and dairy products distributed to needy persons with AIDS through our food bank, "Stone Soup." Stone Soup has proven to be one of our most successful social services efforts. These monies will further assist us to provide our clients with fresh and healthy food products which are donated by individuals and stores in Houston. Thank you for your efforts 1n developing yet another imaginative way to meet the challenge ~ Write the Voice Items 1n the "Letters" column are opinions of readers. Publication of such opinions does not infer a concurring view by the Voice. Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest. Please keep letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor," Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006. All letters must be signed and include address and phone number to verify authenticity Address and phone will not be printed. Name will be withheld on request APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Beginning Next Friday in the Montrose Voice mmm~mmm Our Guide to Montrose Nightlife. "Ahhhh, yes. a map to the land of indulgious embellishments" -W.C. Fields • COMEDY WORKSHOP 2105 SAN FELIPE HOUSTON. TX 77019 (713) 524-7333 presents a special engagement with comedienne Judy Tenuta April 21st 8:30pm benefitting the AIDS Foundation Tickets $10 with Champagne Reception after the Show For Reservations• Information Call Comedy Workshop at 524-7333 Olhet' pecionnances will be April 22-26 2923 Main VENTURE-N 522-0000 10 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 Paint and Body Centers 1107-D Upland Dr. Just N. W. of Katy Frwy. & Wilcrest From Minor Dents to Major Restorations 932-94()1 At Sterling our name tells our story-quality, and because we come from England and other parts of Europe our flair for the exotic is perhaps a little more pronounced than at other body shops. We at Sterling care for your car, whether it be a 1972 Grand Prix formerly owned by grandmother, a new Niaan that you've had a wreck in and the whole car aeem. totally mangled or a beloved old classic that you want restored-"ground up." The equif,ment at our shop is "state-of-the-art," in fact you will find it to be quite awe inspiring with euerything at our fingertips. On occasions we can take an insurance totalled car, winch it on to our incredibly powerful frame machine and with precision accuracy have it straightened to manufacturer's specs, totally repainted and back on the road in as little as 48 hours. When commissioned to perform your work we are instantly into action orchestrating all departments in an effort to get you "on the road" as quickly as possible. If you need the car yesterday, we will certainly try. We often work round the clock and always work on weekends to ensure that you-our clients are happy and back driving your automobile. Sterling welcomes insurance claims and will be happy to send a wrecker out to pick up your car. Loan cars are available here at Sterling so that while repairs are being carried out on your vehicular ~ransportation (car), you have something to get around m. At Sterling the paint and materials we use are of the very highest quality available. The use of high tech paints like Acrylic Eurethane (which is particularly resilient to the climate conditions in this part of the world) are an everyday occurance. On a few occasions we have been asked about the financing of repairs and the answer is often in the affirmative. The financing can be available for anything from getting accident damage repaired to restoring a classic to show car perfection. Just ask for details. The management and staff at Sterling extend to you- our clients-an open invitation to meet with us and discuss any automotive paint and body problem you may have, and if you have none- just come by to visit us anyway and see the restorations we are currently absorbed in-Ferrari- Rolls Royce­Porsche- Mustang and even a \I. W. Bug for a discerning California client. Poll: Americans Support Premarital AIDS Testing WASHINGTON (UPI)-Nearlyfourout of five Americans believe couples plan­ning to marry should be tested for AIDS, a poll said Saturday, but more than half of respondents said they had not changed their behavior to guard against AIDS. The CNN-U.S. News & World Report poll, conducted by The Roper Organiza­tion, also found that a majority of Amer­icans believe the government should pay for treatment of AIDS patients with a new drug found to help sufferers cope with the deadly illness. The survey of 1,017 people, conducted at the end of March, asked whether test­ing for the AIDS virus should be required for various groups. Seventy-seven percent said couples planning marriage should take the blood test, and 74 percent of respond­ents favored testing of people entering hospitals. Seventy-four percent favored testing immigrants, and 71 percent favored testing persons entering the armed services. Only those entering the armed servi· ces currently are required to have an AIDS blood test taken. Only 7 percent of the respondents said they themselves had had a test to deter· mine whether they carry the AIDS virus, but 43 percent said they had changed their behavior in some way to reduce their exposure to AIDS. Acquired immune deficiency syn· drome is a viral disease that breaks down the body's immune systell), leav­ing a person susceptible to a variety of illnesses, including pneumonia and cancer. As of March 30, the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta reported 33,482 cases of AIDS in the United States, of which 19,394 victims have died. Researchers say AIDS is transmitted primarily by sexual contact and the sharing of intravenous needles. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop has recommended that people who are sexu­ally active but not involved in a faithful monogamous relationship should use condoms to prevent possible transmis· sion of the virus that causes AIDS. But the CNN-U.S. News poll said 53 percent of respondents said they had not changed their sexual behavior at alli as a result of the epidemic the same number that said they were "not at all worried" about getting AIDS. Only 10 percent said they were very worried about contracting the disease. More than half of the respondents- 59 percent-also said they thought the government should pay for the expen­sive new drug, AZT, shown to prolong the life of AIDS patients if the victim could not afford it. Almost all respondents said people who have the AIDS virus should inform their sexual partners. Ninety-five per· cent said spouses should be informed and 94 percent said anyone with whom the person has sex should be informed. Only 43 percent thought people who carry the virus, but who do not actually have the disease, should inform their health insurance company. Fifty-seven percent said such people should stop having sex entirely. Eighty-two percent of the respond­ents said newspaper obituaries should not mention that a person died of AIDS if the victim's family objects. The poll's margin of error was 4 per· cent. APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 FEIFFER® F1£!(£, HomtiR- " . f \ IS 1MI 1lt€ 1HAkJl<S ! $1? / Inmate Claims to Have Arranged 'Personals' Killing KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (UPI)-An Okla­homa prison inmate claims he arranged from his prison cell to have a Blount County man killed last year in what authorities said April 10 is a "bizarre" scenario. The claims of David Paul Hammer, 28, an inmate at the state prison in McA­lester, Okla., are being taken seriously, Blount County District Attorney David Ballard said. Hammer said he never met the victim in person, but made contact with him through the Los Angeles-based maga­zine The Advocate. "He (Hammer) says he set the thing up. It appears that he may have done that," Ballard said April 10, "This guy gets very vague sometimes. He's very difflicult to deal with at times." "It's really all bizarre," Ballard said. Detectives traveled to Oklahoma in December to intervew Hammer, who claims he set up the Nov. 23, 1986, kil­ling of Kenneth Kenner, 39, of Louis-ville, Tenn. Kenner was found beaten to death Nov. 24 at his apartment in the Blount County community near Alcoa, Tenn. No arrests have been made. Hammer is serving a total of 1,200 years on 13 felony convictions in Okla­homa. He told The Knoxville News­Sentinel in a telephone interview from his cell he arranged to have a former cellmate rob and kill Kenner. Hammer said he corresponds with people through The Advocate, getting them to send him money. He claims to have netted over $50,000 through the setup last year. Hammer said Kenner did not realize he was in prison. He said he uses part of the money he gets for a telephone ans­wering service, so people with whom he corresponds will not know he is behind bars. Hammer said his correspondence with Kenner led him to believe the Ten­nessee man had money, so he decided to hire someone to rob him. He said he con­tacted a former cellmate and told the man to rob Kenner and "to leave no wit­nesses." Hammer claims the former cellmate killed Kenner by beating him over the head with a roofing axe. "I told him to kill the guy," Hammer told The News-Sentinel. The inmate said he telephoned the Kenner residence the day of and day after the killing. He said he talked with his ex-cellmate the first time, who told him Kenner was dead. Ballard said the second call tipped off authorities because County Detective Kenneth Myers answered the phone. Authorities then found letters from Hammer when they searched Kenner's home. Ballard said authorities are search­ing for Hammer's former cellmate. "We also are looking into the possibil­ity of charging Hammer, seeing if we can charge him and bring him back to Tennessee," Ballard said. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 AKE THE RIGHT CON ECTION • • on Houston's outrageous New conference Call our exciting phone service has become the rage In canfornla, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Now we have made It available to gay men right here in Texas! we are the first and biggest company In the field-our conferences are HOT!! When you dlal you Wiii be connected to an ongoing, UNINHIBITED CONFERENCE CALL, with up to nine men from all over Houston. NOT PROFESSIONALS! Just nine interesting men, like yourself, anxious to make new acquain­tances. LIVE! NOT A RECORDING. Top or bottom, short or tall, young or old, they're all here! It's only $2*-cheap by any standards, and billed discreetly to your phone bill. No credit cards are required. Your anonymity is guaranteed. Call 713-976-9696 now and see what you have been missing. • Houst~~: 713-976-9696 *This call is only 52 in most of the 713 area codes. Matching is random and you may not hear another caller as:id yet still be charged. can at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi­tional toll charges may apply in some areas. 'Well, this isn't very promising." '{OU CA\.\. \Wo.\ fl.. ~~~. \\ \..00\<S \..\\<.E 1". l\l~? ett: ~CA.~~\\ .... I>.~'\:> "-!AA\ ""'i!>OU\ W.\<; ~0~ ~~ 'IOU '&Bl \N~~~,~~ ~~N~ -mam R~~~. ~R ~\~/ "Yesl Yesl That's ill ... Just a little higher.'' ,._,, APRIL 17. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Voice Comics The wind's picked up, thought William. BOB IS 51\0Cl(E[) TO LEAR~ T\-1.b\l' n\E ESCALfl.IOR ~ LONGE~ STOPS Al II-IE $EVEN°™ FLOOR. ... Two thirds of the way through his 935-page book, Elliot realized it was about a guy who went to the hardware store. \\ 'N~ O~L'I \\-\'i. ~S\ \\)°"- \ t.\JER ~\), 00\.DRE.S\\ 14 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 By Gayle Young NEW YORK (UPI)-As daylight fades in the very worst neighborhoods of the city, small bands of former drug addicts' descend for a nightly street fight against the spread of AIDS. Addicts, Needles and Readily admitted into the same notor­ious shooting galleries they once fre­quented, the ex-addicts teach attentive users how to sterilize needles with boil­ing water and bleach. In San Francisco, a health depart­ment worker dispenses condoms and gallon jugs of Clorox to addicts from a sack he carries across his back like Santa Claus. And, in New Jersey, health department agents have been passing out informational AIDS pam­phlets with coupons that allow drug users free treatment in the state's drug treatment clinics. But unlike their European counter­parts, cities in the United States have stopped short of passing out the one thing some believe may halt the spread of the deadly disease among drug addicts disposable intravenous nee­dles. "Basically, the only thing we have to give them is information," said Conrad Mouge, who directs New York City's 40 former addicts involved in its AIDS edu­cation program. Proposals to distribute free sterile nee­dles in San Francisco, New York, New Jersey and Washington, D.C.-which have the highest numbers of addicts with AIDS in the nation-have met with a storm of opposition from indig­nant legislators, concerned police and wary drug counselors. Coll 529-8490 a nd }Tou will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose "The proposal has been brought up and was shot down pretty quickly," Paul Barnes, spokesperson for the San ~ancisco city health department, said m a recent telephone interview. "We're still following the cities in Europe to see how they are doing. But for us, it's 'no go'." Next to homosexual males, intraven-ilized needles available argue it may save lives because sketchy studies in New York have indicated that while most addicts say they sterilize their nee­dles, only between 3 percent and 20 per­cent actually do so. "Our ability to predict what drug users will do is never very good, but there is a feeling that if clean needles In cities where needles are illegal, addicts buy them from corrupt pharmacies and hospital storerooms, Des Jarlais said. "They are passed around simply because there aren't enough available for everyone." ous drug users are the most likely group in America to become infected with, and die from, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, health officials say. The Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta report intravenous drug users account for 17 percent of the 33,158 recorded AIDS cases in the United States to date and another 8 percent of people with the disease are both IV drug users and homosexual. The percentages have remained steady since IV users were first recognized as a risk group in the early 1980's. Health officials say the HIV virus that causes the di5ease can be found on traces of blood in unsterilized needles passed from user to user, often in "shooting galleries" where addicts gather to buy cocaine and heroin and shoot up from needles rented for 50 cents per use. Proponents of proposals to make ster-were available they would use them," Don Des Jarlais, coordinator for AIDS programs in the New York State Div­ision of Substance Abuse Services, said in an interview. Des Jarlais helped draft a controver­sial proposal now under consideration that would establish a needle exchange program in New York City on a trial basis. The pilot program, criticized by the city's police department, would allow drug addicts to exchange dirty needles for sterilized needles and is loosely based on European models. In Amsterdam, the first city to start a needle distribution program, drug users can obtain free sterilized needles from any one of 16 locations, including two roving buses, simply by turning in their old, used needles. Last year the city _exchanged 400,000 new syringes for its estimated 8,000 junkies, health officials there say, and the program has spread to most Dutch cities. Some 34,000 free needles have been distributed to an estimated 4,000 drug addicts in Copenhagen by Danish health authorities in a still­experimental program. But Danish drug users can buy sterile needles as well. A vending machine in the heart of the city dispenses an estimated 60 nee­dles a day for the equivalent of $1.40. Sweden does not officially sanction the distribution of needles, but health officials there say they are allowing doc­tors at the Lund hospital to give addicts needles on a trial basis. While the programs are accepted in Europe, they have their critics there as well. Helle Olsen, of the Swedish Social Welfare Board, said the Lund program has been criticized by people who say addicts will share needles anyway and that making them available might tempt younger people to give intraven­ous use a try. Health officials in the United States, and in the European cities themselves, say it is too early to tell if the programs are reducing the number of AIDS cases. And, since it is difficult to pinpoint exactly when a person with AIDS picked up the virus, they may never know for sure. "I can't say it will stop the spread of AIDS; you can't stop the use of dirty needles 100 percent," said Ernst Bun­ing, a psychologist for Amsterdam's municipal health services department who helped develop the city's ground­breaking program. But, he said he believed it was better ·----MARCH TO KROGER An Easter Parade of flowers are waiting for you at the Kroger Floral Shoppe. Select from a tremend­ous variety of florist quality flowering and foliage plants grown especially for Kroger customers. We're baking up a special Easter treat ••• colorful bunny cakes. They're sure to please your whole family. You can count on the Kroger Deli for quality & freshness for Easter •MONTROSE KROGER STORE •4 EXPRESS LANES DAILY OPEN 24 HOURS APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 AIDS: A Seething Dispute those in Holland." Des Jarlais also said European health officials have told him needle distribu­tion programs allow them to keep tabs on addicts and give them an opportun­ity to try to rehabilitate them. for health officials to make any effort than to look back years later and say, "We wish we had done something." Des Jarlais, who studied the Amster­dam program before making a proposal for New York, said he too believes cities should distribute needles, even if there is no proof it will halt the spread of AIDS. "There would be some problems, some difficulties," he said "But we have rea­son to believe it's worthwhile to try." But others argue that distributing needles would do more harm than good. They say it would appear to both addicts and the public as a government sanction of illegal drug use and many legislators have said it is unfair to use tax money for such a program. Perhaps the most compelling argu­ment against the distribution of free needles comes from the police depart­ments of the rities where illegal drug use has led to significant crime and wides­pread social problems. In New York City, the police depart­ment has come come out strongly against the proposed pilot program, believing it would undercut the arrests of suspected drug addicts and pushers on paraphernalia charges. Drugs are bought and used, but nee­dles remain as evidence. "It would create additional problems for drug enforcement, possibly promote drug use," spokesman Capt. Michael Julian said. "We do make more drug arrests for paraphernalia than for actual substance. "They have their reasons for suppo~t- "Our ability to predict what drug users will do is never very good, but there is a feeling that if clean needles were available they would use them" ing it," he said of the health officials who are pushing the state health com­missioner to approve the pilot program. "We have our reasons for being against it." Still others question whether addicts would use sterile needles even if they were available. Surveys of several hundred drug users conducted by Des Jarlais's office in 1984 showed that an estimated 99 percent of the city's estimated 200,000 IV drug addicts are aware of the risk of AIDS transmission but only half said they tried to sterilize their needles. Mauge, who heads New York's ex­addict outreach program, said addicts repeatedly tell him they are sterilizing their needles, but said these same addicts are often seen later sharing nee­dles rented in shooting galleries. "I don't know, if needles were availa­ble, if they would change their habits because it is habit," Mouge said. "Even if they had a fresh needle they might still shoot up with three or four people because that's how it's done." However, in the 36 states that allow needles to be purchased openly, addicts CRAB LICE STUDI-Y~~~ --__.( Baylor College of Medicine Department of Dermatology is conducting a study of a new crab lice treatment. Volunteers may be male or female, between 18-65 years old, and diagnosed as having crab lice within the last 24 hours. Volunteers will be compensated. Call 799- 6137. usually don't share their equipment, he said. "You look at New Orleans, where the addicts have the same profile, the same types, and HIV infection is 1 percent compared to here where in some areas it's probably 50 percent," he said. "In New Orleans they go to Woolworths, buy a needle and shoot at home." In New Jersey, where needle pur­chases are illegal, 62 percent of the state's 1,901 AIDS cases are related to IV drug use. Mouge said states with high numbers of intravenous drug users usually have passed laws making possession of nee­dles illegal in an attempt to make drug use less accessible and to to give police a reason to arrest suspected drug users. "So here they go to galleries," said Mouge, who generally supports a needle exchange program. "I do believe we might reduce a por­tion of AIDS," he said. In cities where needles are illegal, addicts buy them from corrupt pharma­cies and hospital storerooms, Des Jar­lais said. "They are passed around simply because there aren't enough available for everyone." Des Jarlais said needles can be steril­ized by boiling them in water for more than 15 minutes or soaking them in bleach for a similar time period. He said he believes users want to sterilize their needles, but often times don't have the facilities or presence of mind to do so. "If given a choice, they'll choose a clean needle," he said. "I can't believe our drug users are not as shrewd as "It's an excellent way to get access and build up trust," he said. While the debate is continuing, it appears most American health and legislative officials have decided against needle distribution programs and are not likely to change their minds unless new evidence emerges. ~ :::> w z :J f­( J ~ :0 () 0 z 0 B AUTOMOTIVE 3 ~ SPRING SPECIAL ~ ~ Air Conditioning ~ w Check & Charge 26.95 Oil Ir Lube 24.95 Cooling System Service 27.95 1411 T1'ft I- 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi'e Help Us Celebrate Our First Anniversary lH at The (S®@t\ Ho me of HGT Country Sunday-April 26, 1987 $1 Longnecks and Well Drinks Music from your DJ Jim Lambert Free Drinks Compliments of Betsy and Becky 2:00-4:00pm (713) 666-3464 ----------·------·--------------9150 S. Main 16 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 'Campus Man' Goes Beneath the Flesh Todd (John Dye) enlists the aid of some photogenic college athletes for his student calendar in "Campus Man" Houston Screens by Bill O'Rourke Montro~e Voice "Preaching to be saved." How often have we heard that phrase? People with a message try to get it heard by winding up feeling that the only people listening to them agree already. The producers of Campus Man seem to have gone a long way to avoid that situation. From their advertising, I was Jed to expect a cute, brainless little exploita­tion comedy featuring not a Jot of plot but lots of hot male bodies. And for the first 20 minutes or so, we get just that. Our heroines, Kim Dela­ney and Kathleen Wilhoite, are sitting around the pool watching breathtaking men, especially Steve Lyon, do very aes­thetically pleasing high dives (Though Lyon has a double do his actual dives, there is no way to tell it from the film.). Stretched out around them, for variety, are willowly blond boys. This gives Lyon's roommate, John Dye, ideas. He will produce an all-male pin-up calendar for the ladies-a salute to sports. With that, we get some very tasty shots of photo sessions with lots of flexing muscles. Then, after they've got us caught, the filmmakers pull the old switcheroo. We get to the meat of the movie, the real thought-provoking comedy that was hiding under that sheep's clothing. This is actually a show about the consequen­ces of exploitation. So, you see, director Ron Casden and friends have enticed into the theater the very people they want to talk to. Not only that, they've given them an open­ing that will get them to forgive nearly anything. And if they ever feel they're starting to lose us, they can always have Lyon, who has been an All­American linebacker and a GQ cover model, take his shirt off. Or tease us with Miles O'Keefe. Remember Bo Derek's Tarzan? He's here as the older, slightly sinister bad man to spice up this steady diet of young innocents. But he never does take his shirt off. I guess that's to prove that Casden isn't giving us exactly the kind of entertainment he looks upon criti­cally. Now, for those of you who don't like beefcake, this movie is good comedy­drama. Although this is an entirely fictitious story, it was inspired by Todd Headlee, an Arizona State University student who created the first male pin-up calendar. In honor of him, and because it's an interesting location, the movie was made at A.S.U. Headlee produced the calendar five years ago. It takes a willing suspension of disbelief to accept that, in the movie, this savvy marketing student has his independent brainstorm just last year. Then, to further stretch our credulity, although Dye is having a lot of trouble selling the calendars in Tempe, one of them just happens to show up on the desk at a magazine in New York. Morgan Fairchild, the editor, decides that she must have Lyon as her "Man of the '80s." It means a very lucrative year­long contract. Mark Hammon, in his first motion picture starring role, plays a gym coach pressured into taking charge of a remedial English class during summer session in "Summer School" Dye is very proud of what he's done for his friend, but Lyon doesn't want it. Years ago as kids Dye introduced him to diving. Now he's a top-notch college diver with a chance at the Olympics. How can Dye take back the dream he gave him? For this will jeopardize his amateur tanding. And their friendship, too. The women are there for the romance and to help instruct the men's conscien­ces. By the way, keep an eye on Delaney. I got confused and wasn't always sure she was the same woman. This movie is really about friendship. It's also the closest we're likely to get to a sports movie about diving. There are some beautiful dives, lovingly pho­tographed. o Film Clips There will be a one-night festival of the works of explorer, filmmaker and under­water cinematographer Jack McKen­ney at the Adams Mark Hotel next Friday. He will take time out from shoot­ing Jaws IV to fly up from the Bahamas and attend a 6:30 cocktail party before the screenings. Info & tickets: 661-6080. week and letting the Houston Interna­tional Film Festival take its deserved spotlight stage center. Everything is going to be so fresh at the festival that as I prepared this column, they were not sure what's happening when. They will by this weekend. Calendars will be available at participating theaters like the Greenway III or the Museum of Fine Arts. On the commercial scene, the only thing I'm sure is coming out this week is Project X. It stars Matthew Broderick and concerns a chimpanzee who has learned how to speak in sign language. A few things are happening on the art Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, their days as "The Big Kahuna" and "The Queen of the Sand" a fading memory, contemplate a return to the fun and sun in "Back to the Beach" Paramount Pictures is celebrating its 75th anniversary this summer with, among other things, reruns (Beverly Hills Cop 11). retellings (The Untoucha­bles) and returns. Yes, Annette Funi­cello and Frankie Avalon go Back to the Beach. There's a brand new Carl Reiner comedy starring Mark Hammon in his show circuit: Liquid Sky (River Oaks, 17 & 18) Menage (River Oaks, 22 & 23)­French black comedy Charulata (The Lonely Wife) (Rice Media Center, 23)-film by Indian direc­tor Satyajit Ray A Home for Ladies (Goethe Institute, 23)-Eberhard Fechner interviews 16 Jimmy Garrett (Mathew Broderick), a young Air Force pilot assigned to a top secret military training program, becomes in110/11ed in a suspenseful adventure with a highly intelligent chimpanzee named Virgil, who has been tau1<ht to communicate in sign language in "Project X" first starring role in a movie, Summer School. o Curtain Up Everybody's sort of sitting back this retired Catholic noblewomen about the history of Germany since Kaiser. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voite 214 713 Peak hours: 8:00 pm to 2:00 am Only $2.00 per call (toll charge may apply in some areas). Recommended for men 18 years or older. APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 THE MEN'S CONNECTION PRESENTS JUD 18 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 521-9838 3404 Kirby The H\U\t Room presents Michael Dally The Finest in Dining and The Best in Cabaret Entertainment in the New Piano Bar Sunday Bnmch with Kim Keithley at the Plano $495 Lunch Special Includes Wine, Salad, Entree, Dessert Mon.-Frl. $695 Salad, Entree, Dessert, Tea or Coffee Mon.-Frl. llam-2:30pm and 5-llpm Sat. 5pm-Mldnlght Sun. llam-3pm (Brunch) 5-IOpm Make Your Easter Reservations Early! APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 ~ ''IT'S PAR\ OF COMRADE GORBACHEV'5 N~W 'OPENNESS'!" Every-where You Go, You Must Fly Merged purchase a headset for $39.95?" " I'll read." "In the dark? Our 90-minute feature film tonight is 'Big Behemoth Loves You.' It's the warmhearted story of how the airline industry has benefited from the final merger. For example, all the pilots now speak the same technical lan­The Innocent Bystander guage." by Arthur Hoppe "Good evening, sir. You'll be flying with us on Behemoth Airways tonight?" "Do I have a choice?" "Well, no you don't, do you? I guess we're the only one left since we merged with U.S. - Texas - American - Delta - Pan-Ameri­can - TWA - World Airways. But as the Justice Department said in approving this very last airline merger, 'One big happy com­pany will better service the public."' "Well, frankly, I think the quality of your service has deteriorated badly." "Oh, yeah? Well, the quality of our customers isn't so hot either. Take you: bleary eyes, a two-day beard and that suit looks like you slept in it." "Who slept? I was in line between three screaming children and a lady with a dyspeptic St. Bernard in a box. I haven't had a wink in 48 hours." "And another thing, you customers - -Sj,;ciai! - - 15% Discount on African Chiclid Tropical Fish on Fancy Gold Fish on 20 gal. High Aquarium Combos on 6-sided Flat Back 16 gal. Combos on Hermit Crabs & their Accessories Bring this ad with you to get 15% discount before April 24 Tom's Pretty Fish 234 Westheimer ,!!'ly. !b ~k!!'o!!!.M a..!!' ~ complain a lot more than you used to. Grouse, grouse, grouse. Now, what class do you want to fly, Executive Steerage, Business Steerage or Economy Steer­age?" "How much is Executive Steerage?" "If you have to ask,you can'tafford it. But I can let you have a one-way ticket from San Francisco to L.A. for $787." "Don't you have a special fare good after midnight Wednesdays for the emo­tionally disabled without baggage because it was stolen while they were trying to fend off muggers?" "What's a special fare? Where do you want to sit?" "I'll take a window?" "What's a window?" "All right, I'll take an aisle." "What's an aisle? Look, Mac, I'll put you in 17-C." "Is that nonsmoking?" "You want nonsmoking? OK, I'll move you to 17-B. Nonsmoking's every other seat. What about your in-flight meal? Would you prefer bread or water?"- "Not both?" "Not unless you want to move up to Executive Steerage. Would you care to "The same technical language?" "Like, you know, 'Holy criminy, look out!' Stuff like that. Now, let's see, your direct flight will stop at Manteca, Modesto, Merced, Madera and Mel's Tree Farm to take on wood." "Wood?" "Yes, this is one of our ecologically­sound, economical, wood-burning jets. Then the stewardess will demonstrate the use of the parachute as you try to fly over the Tehachapis." "I get a parachute?" "No, the stewardess does. Your safety features include an individual St. Chris­topher's medal and a Gideon Bible in the seat pocket in front of you." "Wonderful. I notice on the board up there that there's no time of departure. When will the flight take off?" "As soon as we can fill it up. That should be within several days, though." "Several days? Before the last merger, didn't you have a flight to L.A. every hour on the hour?" "Yes, we did. But for some reason, peo­ple don'tseem to be flying as much these days as they used to." 1987 (S.F) Chronicle Publ1sh-in-g- Co _ _ _ Al's Insurance Service 4108 Fannin Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 529-0140 AUTO LIABILITY SR-22 FILINGS YOUNG DRIVERS LOW DOWN PAYMENTS LIFE COMMERCIAL AUTO BONDS PROPERTY HOMEOWNERS NOTARY SERVICE Fortunes No More Concealed Secrets for Leo By Mark Orion Your Horoscope from the Voice For Fflday evenmg. April 17, through Fnday mornmg. Apnl 23. 1987 ARIES-Feeling lethargic? Got the blahs? Motor won't turn over? Do some­thing you've never done before. You need to get out of your humdrum rout ine. A midnight swim, or something even more bizarre connected with water might be the answer. Take along a Pisces or Scorpio. TAURUS-That little thing on the side keeps growing larger all the time. You just can't keep your mind off the current attraction, as it becomes a real distrac­tion from what should be important to you. Like a silly song you can't help sing­ing, it's forgettable but cute. GEMINI-What an idea! Why did'! I think of that? Lightning stikes again: a man and a women that you're close to will both benefit from your mind-bending innovations, though not in the same way. It will be very interesting to watch their reactions as you plot it all out. CANCER-The gods made this time just for Cancers. So you'd better not blow it. Here's a respite from troubles and an opening for something special. Slide into it. Don't let it slide by! LEO-You've put away your nasty growl and you have no more secrets to conceal. The light and fun that carried you through last time can now be brought into your work and business life. You've got a lot to give, and those around you will do more than appreciate it. VIRGO-Romance gets put on the back burner while you turn the old sex drive on high. That could take you to some pretty strange places that make you unreachable to those you're close to. Maybe you should pursue your activities with some discretion, no? LIBRA-What is it with your lover or close one these days? The more positive and loving you are, the more negative and distant the relationship. You're doing what comes naturally to you, so there's no point in trying to make drastic changes. Be yourself and listen for clues. SCORPIO-Put on your travelling shoes and shuffle off to-well, maybe not Buffalo, but you won't have to go far to get a thrill of adventure. You've been longing for it, so if you can't get out of town, let your mind do the travelling. A good fantasy, couldn't hurt. SAGITTARIUS- The power of love that struck you last time has a healing effect and enables you to move ahead in other areas of your life. With your night­times shining, your day-to-day responsi­bilities take on a better, brighter light. CAPRICORN-The heat is on; body heat and mental heat are high, and so are you. High, hot and somewhat more out­rageous than your usual self, you can learn a lot and teach some things too. Don't let the heat get you down; it should be getting you up, up, up' AQUARIUS-Let your intuitive, yield­ing side guide you through this time of decisions. You can continue to stand at the crossroads, and you've got to be able to trust yourself before you choose your turn. Meditate on what's central to you, and most important. PISCES- Now comes the turning point. Balanced between yesterday's requirements and tomorrow's hopes is the part of your life that involves decision and committment. You'd love to get lost in dreams, but reality beckons. 20 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 Special Easter Sunday Show Nexus Naughties and Muscles in Action lOpm Show 250 Well and Draft 8-lOpm Monday-Take it All Off Night (Male Strip) 10pm M.C. Maude $75-1st Place $25-2nd Place Tuesday-10¢ Night 5pm-2am $3 Cover 10¢ Well and Draft Wednesday-Dog Night 25¢ Hot Dogs and 25¢ Draff on Patio plus Liquor Bust 9pm-1am $6 all you can drink Thursday-Muscles in Action featuring Hunter 10pm and 12 midnight No Cover New-Friday Amateur Male Strip 10pm $100-1st p~ace Where the hot men of Houston take it all off for you Saturday: Wet Jockey Short Contest (Must wear white type jockey shorts) $100-1st Place Sat. & Sun. Afternoon Beer Bust on Patio 12 noon-8pm $2, 3pm-8pm Free Hot Dogs & Hamburgers - --- - -------------- 0.J. Doug Summers !!1w~!·-~!& Stages Grow-s w-ith New- 'Hair' APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 baseball game in Houston, the Houston Stonewalls defeated the Galveston Robert Lees 35-2. Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice As a whole, Stages production of Hairis a very, very good show. It's a bit of a mixed bag, really, but any show that can give me the electric cold goose­bumps that this one did several times and winds up with me on a crying jag is a contender. It's its own animal. Director Ted Swindley has paid more attention to the Ardencie Hall sings "Let the sunshine in" in the tribal love rock musical "Hair," playing through May at Stages Repertory Theatre plot than did '67s Broadway director Tom O'Horgan and his assistant Har­vey Milk. This may be more like the orig­inal off-Broadway production. There was a rumor at the time that it had stayed closer to the script. They beefed up the plot considerably for the movie. So don't expect this to be quite like that, either. Although all three are/ were celebra­tions, the Swindley version comes off the most critical of the tribe. Through subtle emphasis, he never quite lets us forget that women had not yet found equality-even to the extent they have today. Though relationships with blacks were fairly good, they were a dis­tinct tribe within the tribe with a separ­ate, important agenda which their white brothers do not seem to fully embrace. There is one gay brother, but he claims loudly that he isn't. You have to remember that this was two years before Stonewall. The central character and the real star of this huge cast is Claude, played by Curtis C. Alfrey. In the O'Horgan staging he as pretty much an innocent who became a sacrificial lamb when he was drafted and then died in Viet Nam. In the movie, the plot's changed so much that he's an innocent bystander, not a member of the tribe at all, really. Then he's heroically saved. In this Swindley retelling, he's a sweet but cor­rupt little boy who finds his real roots, gets the guts to face the truth and dies bravely. In the O'Horgan, Claude's going to war was seen as something of a sell-out, cop-out, almost cowardly maneuver. Hair originally came out in '67. It can be seen partially as that generation try­ing to explain itself to the '4 7 genera­tion. That's stated specifically in one of the songs. So it is perfect that we now have the '87 generation examining the work to see whatitoffers them. The vast majority of this cast is too young to per­sonally i;_emember the period. So we are guaranteed a fresh-eyed reappraisal. But that is not exactly what Swindley envisioned. "As a retrospective, it ... allow(s) us to ask . . . how we've changed and how we've stayed the same," to quote his notes from the pro­gram. When we enter the theater, we do not realize that those playing the leading roles are sitting amongst us. Then the rest of the tribe pulls them up onto the stage and helps them to change into hip­pie garb. Chris Kinkaid is a handsome, athletic guy. (You may have seen him on Chan­nel 5.) So is Berger, the character he plays. But instead of letting them meet, Swindley has erected an extraneous wall between them. Now Kinkaid is a stud playing an older man remember­ing what it as like to be a stud. Why? Because of this interpretation, the show takes longer to get going strong than it should. Possibly also because of it, some of the songs are approached almost like songs instead of rock. They are examined with the head rather than felt with the pelvis. The singers are in control of the songs rather than vice versa. The rhythms are there but the wildness isn't. Judy Tenuta brings her unique comedy show to the Comedy Workshop April 21 in a benefit for the AIDS Foundation There are 26 people in this show. Obviously, I am unable to mention all of them. But Michael Ballard has really grabbed my attention this season, in this and in Do, Lord. He is catching fire and somebody had better build a show around him, fast! It seems like every 20 years or so, something happens that kills scores of Lillian Evans as Myra and Robert Graham as Charles in "The Middle Ages" playing through April 26 on the Alley Theatre's Arena Stage But when these people do get down to rockin', they can tear the joint apart. There's one solo by Mary Hooper that will tear your heart apart. There are cho­rus numbers that will tear words out of your throat to sing along. (They encour­age the a udience to come in their old '60s garb.) I couldn't help but sing along on "Three-Five-Zero-Zero" which is about bringing the war back home. Like I said, these people often give men those cold, shivery electric tingles that start in your spine and don't let up 'ti) the whole body's vibrating and you've got to move something, tap your toe, whatev~r. And my body shook again, with con­vulsive tears, when Claude died­especially when they brought on the Viet Nam War Memorial to remind us he was only one of many. But they should have taken it off again. "Let the Sunshine In" was seen not so much as a plea for peace and freedom as it was a curtain call celebratory song. It was quite jarring in an unhelpful way in front of that set piece. Americans. The government either is in the forefront when it is a question of war or is lagging behind when it is a ques­tion of disease. It never seems to respond in a manner tht keeps its citi­zens happy. Perhaps, given time, The Normal Heart will be seen as this gener­ation's Hair. o Notes Don't forget! Judy Tenuta's opening night at the Comedy Workshop, April 21, is a benefit for the AIDS Foundation. Also, April 21, is the 10th anniversary of the opening of Annie. It's also the night they've planned to open the sequel, Annie II. I kid you not. The Park, that lovely mall downtown, is celebrating the Symphony v.;th spe­cial decorations and events April 21-25. Chrysalis Reportory Dance Company is touring to Austin this week. o Celebrate! April 21, 1887-In the first recorded Sunday April 19 is Easter. B'days: William Holden, Olivia Hus­sey, J.P. Morgan. 18- Clarence Darrow, Virginia O'Brien, Hayley Mills. 19- August Wilhelm Iffland, Elinor Donahue, Jayne Mansfield. 20-J essica Lange, Harold Lloyd, Luther Vandross. 21- Elaine May, Iggy Pop, Anthony Quinn, Queen Elizabeth II. 22-Glen Campbell, Eddie Albert, Joseph Bot­toms. 23-Lee Majors, William Shakes­peare. "But this wasn't the whole story­that wouldn't be fair/ The memory of his beauty deserves better"-poet C.V. Cavafy (born April 17) o Openings The Chi-Lites (Rockefellers, 17 & 18)­The silver anniversary tour Crimes of the Heart (Theater Subur­bia, 17) One Enchanted Evening (Music Hall, 17 &18)-Newtown Wayland conducts the Hosuton Pops in music by Richard Rodgers. Kid City Waterways (Main Street Theater, 18, 2:00 p.m.) Marimba Magic (Zoo, 19, 2:30)­Freebies. ONO! Hal Tennyson's Big Band (Tranquil­ity Park, 20, noon)-Freebies. ONO! Judy Tenuta (Comedy Workshop, 21)-top-notch punk female comedian Fantasy Island (Houston Center for Photography, 22)-slide lecture by pain­ter and sculptor Fletcher Macky. ONO! Jacqueline Simone (UST Bookstore, 22)-reads from her short fiction. ONO! Texas Troubadors (Main Street Theater, 22)-different vocal singers each Wednesday Arnette Cobb Jazz Quintet (Jones Plaza, 23, noon)-Freebies. ONO! Asleep in the Deep (UST, 23)-world premiere of Pat Cook's newest murder mystery Donovan (Rockefellers, 23 & 24)­Season of the Witch Kind Sir (Actors Theater of Houston, 23)-A Broadway star falls in love with a rogue who is pretending to be married so he won't actually get caught. The Marriage of Figaro (Heinen, 23)­one of the funniest operas ever written Norma (Jones, 23)-Houston Grand Opera presents Ghena Dimitrova as a woman whose thirst for love threatens to destroy her and all she loves. Bellini's bel canto masterpiece. Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose /(~ ~~h 0~~ {!,Ins.sic q)e,wgns o/q/fouslon FLOWERS & GIFTS European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, Fruit a. Gounnet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Stuffed Toys Available. 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted 22 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 N e\V Clue to Why AIDS Develops in Some People research has indicated the HIV virus reproduces at the same rate. "There was evidence that HIV repli­cation was linked to T-cell activation, we wanted to find the mechanism," he said. By Gayle Young UPI Science Writer NEW YORK-Repeated bouts with colds, flu and other common infections may trigger the development of AIDS in people who have already been infected with the HIV virus, researchers reported Wednesday. Scientists at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, Mass., said their studies may prove a widely held theory that the HIV virus that causes AIDS spreads whenever the body's immune system is activated by common, usually trivial, viral and bacterial infections. Eventually, the spread of the virus leads to full-blown AIDS and the des­truction of the immune system, the researchers said. "We don't want to leave the impres­sion you get a cold and then get a ram­pant disease," Dr. Gary Nabel, a researcher at the institute said. "This is a case of chipping away at something over time." The AIDS virus, or HIV for human immunodeficiency virus, can cause no symptoms for five to seven years after infection, although the incubation period is shorter in many cases. During this lag time, the HIV virus probably reproduces each time the body's immune system is activated, Nabel and researcher David Baltimore reported in the British science Journal Nature. They said their laboratory studies indicate the HIV virus lodges in the immune system's T-cells, where they reproduce whenever the cells respond to other viruses and bacteria that enter the body. The researchers were even able to pin­point the specific protein, identified as NF-KappaB, that is released by the T­cells and which binds to the HIV virus and causes it to reproduce, probably kil- 'My Salary Was So High ... I Quit' NEW YORK (UPI)-Workers give all kinds of excuses for quitting their jobs, ranging from a desire to "write poetry on the beach" to embarrassment at being paid too much. A survey released Monday said that 100 of the nation's 1,000 largest corpora­tions responded to the poll conducted by Accountemps, a temporary personnel service. It quoted some reasons given by employees who quit their jobs, includ­ing: -"I'm going to be much happier as a dog trainer than I am as a management consultant." -"They said I couldn't take short nap breaks twice a day." -"I want to write poetry on the beach." -"My salary was so high, itmademe uncomfortable. So I quit." -"They wouldn't let me keep my talk­ing mynah bird in a cage in my own office." -"The job was fine, but it was no place to meet men. Too many of them were bald. with bow ties, suspenders and white socks." -"Now that I won't have any money coming in, I can stop paying alimony." "The results make it eminently clear that the decision to leave a job is not always based on logic and self­interest," a spokesman for Accoun­temps said. ling the T-cell in the process. Over time, the amount of HIV virus increases while the number of T-cells decrease, Nabel said. "Generally you can tolerate the loss of some cells," he said. "We don't know when someone reaches that critical point where you can say they definitely have AIDS, when they have too few T­cells to ward off major infections." People with AIDS have crippled immune systems that allow opportunis­tic infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis to invade their bodies. Doctors estimate 30 percent of people who are exposed to the AIDS virus actu-ally develop the disease, although they say the percentage may prove much higher. The researchers said they did not know why some people who have been exposed to the AIDS virus eventually get the disease and others do not. But they said the viruses and bacteria that may trigger the HIV virus to reproduce are extremely common. "Our bodies' immune systems are always battling something," Nabel said. Nabel said about one in every 1,000 to 10,000 T-cells is activated when bacteria or viruses enter the body. He said other High Race Final Line Naturally The protein that causes HIV to repro­duce is found in all T-cells, he said. "It suggests a steady progression toward AIDS," Baltimore said. "It doesn't suggest any (cure) right away ... it helps us understand better what is going on." Nabel said the researchers isolated T­cells in the laboratory and infected them with HIV virus. He said the cells were then prodded into action with a laboratory-made stimulant, but said natural bacteria and viruses would cause an identical reaction. By studying the reaction, researchers were able to identify the T-cell protein that caused the virus to reproduce. Starts Venture-N aprx. 2:00pm Finishes at Mary's 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 >. Q Q cu I Cf) '- :J 0 Bonnet Judging at Chutes 6:00pm Heels requested & Bonnets requested 0 ~ t:::::::::J ~ Can Beer SI 2c;, Ora!1 Occr 7Sc Morning Afternoon Evening \'I II Or r -s 51 '"; 7am-rJoon 6pm e;..m , '}Upm ·2 'lO"'m SnolO S• Z5 t.1 onday~Sat urday ~: . n : '· E11(•ry r. n• Home of Eagle Leathers Prizes!! Trophies!! Be Blisters!! Lary Thompson, D.J. APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 .; 1732 WESTHEIMER (713) 523-2213 . P.T.L. Par1y Sat. April 18, 10pm Tammy Faye Baker Look-a-like Contest $100 Cash Prize Sat. April 25, 8pm-2am Nightmare on Elmen St. IV Costumes Encouraged/ Benefitting Omega House Alan Webster's Birthday Buffet 8c Champagne Fountain Special D.J. Ram Rocha Numerous Guest Performers After Hours Fri. & Sat. 2-4am Live D.J.-No Cover Black Motorcycle Jackets Style 555 On Sale $9995 April 17-24 Chutes Store Only!! 1/2 Price Shirts & Pants Home of S.P.O.T.-Eagle Leathers-C.S.C. 24 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987 P.T.L. (Pass the Liquor) Jim and Tammy Fay Par1y April 18 Easter Egg Decorating Begins 2pm, continues all afternoon Easter Sunday, April 19 Sally's Easter Bonnet Contest and Egg Judging 7pm PATIO NOW OPEN NEVER A COVER New on Tuesdays! Come Munch and Win A Tab with us at our T.A.B. Tuesday Afternoon Bash Pool Tournament Wednesdays 3pm $1 Entry Fee 1st Place 70°10 of fees, 2nd Place 30°10 of fees Friday T.G.l.F. Party Happy Hour Prices 'til 8pm Every Sat. Ir Sun.-Montrose Artist Allen Thomson 4pm until the sun goes down Art show during Westheimer Art Festival 220 Avondale BRAND NEW! Wednesdays! Celeberity Bartenders 4pm-til? The Original Miss Avondale Thurs. Jockey Short Contest M. C. The Everpresent Maude $100 in Prizes Showtime 10:00 Saturday and Sunday Liquor Bust 4-7pm $5 All the Well You Can Drink BRAND NEW! Starting April 26 Garage Sale in Our Parking Lot Open to All-Set Up as Early as You Like! 529-7525 APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Bonnets and Balls! It's a Lone Star Easter "Soap" by the Staff of the Montrose Voice o Lone Star Classic Beginning today at 10:00 a.m., 18 men's softball teams are competing in the fourth Lone Star Classic. Play con­tinues through Saturday afternoon at Memorial Park fields. Out of towners hail from Dallas, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York Sacramento, Kan­sas City and Virginia. Many of our famous neighborhood taverns are hosting special parties for the visitors, who should expect a good old Montrose style good time. o Another Round The annual Easter high heel race ends at Mary's this Sunday. Competitors begin at the Venture-N at 2:00 p.m. and bonnet judging will be held at Chutes at 6:00 p.m. Winners of Mr. Almost Butch Contest at Chutes are (left to right) Leo Young, first runner-up; Dale Piper, winner, and Bryan Judd, second runner up New Chutes manager, Bar Wilson The end of Lent will be celebrated with a tongue-in-cheek look at the cur­rent "Unholy Wars." Chutes, Dirty Sally's and Roosters are planning to poke fun at America's hottest swinging couple. A skydiving club is being formed at Chutes. (People have always been known to bail out of there). The first meeting is May 2, 3:00 p.m. Just in time for the new 8:00 p.m. Tuesday pool tournaments, Chutes is also sporting a new interior paint job. The new night for Mary Ann Maho­ney and Mata Hari is Wednesday. Bac­chus is still the place to hear the group. E.J.'s pinball tournament starts tonight with the winner after three weeks getting a pinball machine. He manages the unmanageable at Rooster's o Mark Your Calendar Houston Chapter T.G.R.A. meeting for May has been moved to Sunday, May 10, 2:00 p.m. at the Barn. Everyone is welcome to join this fun loving group of cowpokes. Tour the Islands Cozumel-Hawaii­Jamaica Colt 45's skate night will be this Tues­day, April 21, at the Carousel Rink, I-10 and Campbell Road, 8:00-10:00 p.m. The Second Annual Greater Montrose Pet-0-Rama and Easter Bonnet Parade will be Sunday at Cherryhurst Park at 2:00 p.m. Sponsored again by the Gay Political Caucus, it's a chance to show off that wonderful animal that tears up your furniture and eats better than you do. Ribbons will be awarded in several categories and "Best of Show" winners will receive two tickets to the May 7 per­formance of the film "Lily Tomlin." There is a $2 entry fee. Peter of Leather by Boots working on a pair of chaps o Keeping Busy A happy birthday goes out to Burton of Movemasters. He's 29 and holding. Need a quick pick-me-up? Terry and Dennis of Coffee and Tea World serve samples of their different varieties of Tour the Islands this Summer with Us and Our fabulous pool parties! Towne Plaza Luxury Apts. The Place to Live This Summer Live on TV-5 in June Prices start at $355 all bills paid 621-7880 Another Fine finger Property coffee and tea everyday. The unique shop is located on Montrose Blvd. Texas Term-o-Pest is offereing a discount coupon this week on termite, roach and flea control. Spring's here. Time to get rid of those varmints. It was a day for uniforms at Venture-N: (left to right) Bill, Russell, Clint, Bill and Bob -------------------- Animals Make Money the EJ. Way The rest of the zoo's at Naturally Mary's welcomes the Dallas Steele and Chicago MSA Softball Teams ~--------------------J 26 MONTROSE VOICE APRIL 17, 1987 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING PROVIOING A SERVICE? Keep 1t listed here in the Voice where liter­ally thousands turn each week ~ TARGET YOUR MARKET A brochure. newsletter_ promotion can help our business target your goals and reach your market Call 524-0409 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your , professional service through a Vo1ceClass1l1ed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 1t on your Ameri­can Express. Diner's Club. MasterCard. Visa or Carte Blanche Layout Design, Production Copy Specializing in Retail, Medical and Scientific Areas 523-5606 ANNOUNCEMENTS TIREO OF 21.067 TO CHANGE THE LAW, WE MUST CHANGE THE LAW­MAKERS. VOTE LIBERTARIAN. FOR INFORMATION 880-1776. KELLY BRADLEY, M.B.S., R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN lnd1v1dual. family and group practice limited to· coping-stress. role relat1on­sh1ps and self-concept intervention Olf1ce 623-6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voice. a general circulation news­paper having published continuously for over 5 years. 1s qualified to accept legal notices ANSWERING SERVICES PAGE ME• COMMUNICATIONS SYS­TEMS. 622-4240 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD llJSSINGI CAW? Answering Service One Month Free Computerized Service for your Personal Use. • No Tefephone Servtce A.quired • P• Me Assfgns Telephone Nos. • 24 Houri 7 Day Service • Your Mn.ages ere Private • No Live Opentors - NoMiStakes- Only t12 lllm\th1y (or) Jlay tor) months and._..... 4th month rm. Ask About Free Trial Offer Call J im at 622-4240 Paae Me! Et.ctronlc MeH99e Center OtOct Houri · 101m-ifpm Mon.· Frl. ANTIQUES 1948 BARBER CHAIR Art deco Koken-Barrrell 521-0518 ODEON GALLERY 2117 Dunlavy, 521- 1111 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD FINDINGS. 2037 Norlolk. 522-3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD YESTERDAY'S WORLD ANTIQUES. 1715 Westhe1mer, 52&-2646 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD r~~~.~~g~" AntlquH • Estate Sales con11gn.....,ts 2037 Norfolk ._.t.....,. •Dnl Md "'•PMrd1 TUU.-SAT. 11-6 522· 3662 ATTORNEY JAMES D HESS. 3407 Montrose #205. 521-9216 PHYLLIS FRYE, 723-8368 General prac­tice of law To advertise. call 529-8490 during business hours. ELAINE SHAW : g~;~etr:.:.,s~:n • Possession • Family Law • Accident 222-7772 or 645-3159 Nril(P h)" - Bd I ELAINE SHAW, 222-7772, 645-3159 SEE OUR DfSPLA Y AD AUTO REPAIR MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR. 2516 Genesee (HlO Pacific). 52&-3723 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD SALVIN AUTOMOTIVE. 524-8219 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD STERLING PAINT & BODY CENTERS. JJ27a8R ~Fs'~r.~ ~b 932-9401 TAFT AUTOMOTIVE. 1411 Tait. 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 Carburetor Specialist Electrical Repairs All Broke Work BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Dino's Barber Shop. 302 W 1 1th Haircuts $6 up. 863-1520 for appointmenl Tommy's Barber Shop. haircuts $10 and up 2154 Portsmouth Appointments 528- 8216 HAIRCUTS BY MIKE. 522-300_3 __ _ SEE OUR DISPLAY AO JONBARTON 15l5'h Dunlavy.--~ 522-7866 SEE OUR DISPl..AY AD Haircuts, etc. by Mike Shampoo Cut 8i Blow Dry $14 by Mike ('{EB[AM, \VHA1 WAt; 1HA1 U\\.V I/OU 10LD ME ABOlJT CNCE ? ~~ SALON 1515% Dunlavy 522-7866 BARS Knew Mood Nu-bar Second drink com­phmentary with mention of this ad 133€ Westhe1mer 529-3332 GAY BARS The following list are only the gay bars which have placed a recent advertisement in the Voice For information on these bars. please see their ads For information on other bars (such as type of cllentele). call lhe Gay Switchboard at 529-3211 or see their ads in other publications BACCHUS. 523 Lovett. 523-3396 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM (BAB). 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD COUSINS. 817 Fwv1ew. 528-9204 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CAMP CLOSET. 109 Tuam. 528-98t4 SEE OUR OJSPLA Y AD CHUTES. l732 Westhe1mer. 523-2213 gE OUR DISPLAY AD DIRTY SALL y·s. 220 Avondale. 529-7525 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Elsi. 2SURalph 8i Westhe1mer 527-9071 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD KJ'S. , 1a3o Airline. 445-5849 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MARY'S. 1022 W-esthe1mer 52B-8851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MEN-ERGY. 911 WI Drew. 522-7524 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MICHAELS. 428 Westh.;;;;;er. 529-2506 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD THE RANCH. 91so s Main, 666-3464 SEE OUR DISPLA)' AD RENDEZVOUS. 1100 Westhe1me-,-. -- 527-8619 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RIPCORD, 715 Fairview, 521 -21~ SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Jn"o~k101~~:_.~~ge. 528-9079 VENTURE-N. 2923 Main, 522-0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RENDEZVOUS CLUB 1100 Westheimer 527-8619 Mon.-Sat. 9am-5am Sunday 3pm- 5am BONOSMAN A-QUICK BAIL BONDS Fasl. courteous. discreet, all type o f ~~~~~~~: :C:~~;~1r ~2~t~l1d:iP;;,:m:;~ bonds. 678-4488. 821-8452 BOOTS Oh Boy• Quality Boots. 912 Westheimer. 524-7859 CARS AND Bl KES Be gay Drive home a new Susuki Sama­ra1. Call Pat 641-8475 or Tom 641-8476 SELL YOUR CAR through a Monlrose Voice class1f1ed ad Call 529-8490 STERLING Chauller driven Rolls Royces available for all occasions or just for the fun of it. Call Ken at 932-9401 CHURCHES KINGDOM COMMUNITY CHURCH, 614 E 19th, 880-3527. 351-4217 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CENTER FOR A POSITIVE LIFESTYLE. 531-6600 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO t;enter for a Positive Lifestyle A Loving, Metaphysical, Splrltual Celebration meets Downtown Hollday Inn, 801 Calhoun every Monday Spm For more Info, Dl•l 497- PRAY Kingdom Community Church .. Jom Our Family m 1987 614 E. 19th Sundays 11am 862-7533 CLEANING SVCS SERVICE PLUS A Quality Cleaning Service Residential • Commercial e BONOED e Jelf Cunningham 522-3451 COFFEE COFFEE & TEA w"oRLD. 3939-R Montrose. 524-8536 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Coffee & Tea World Gourmet Coffee • Fine Teas Accessories 3939-R Montrose Blvd. 713-524-8536 CONSIGNMENTS FINDINGS, 2037 Norfolk. 522-3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACT! NG ALL AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION. 827-1422 or 497-5228 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD HSK CONTRACTING. 520-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD COUNSELING DR NICHOLAS EDD 2128 Welch. 527-8680 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. D D.S 427 Westhe1mer. 524-0538 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RONALD A PETERS, DDS 620 W Ala­bama 523-2211 EXAM- X-RAY­CLEANING Evening Hours llon Peters, D.D.S. 620 W. Alabama 523-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Wes1he1m<·r H111 "1"11 TX 7;c1ut1 M1.r111d1, 1hru S..11ur Hour~ by Appt 1111m1·n1 (713) 524-0538 DWELLINGS. ROOMMATES. HOUSES/APTS. FDR SALE. RENT. LEASE House lor lease. FM 1960 area 3-2-2. fire- ~~~~e·s~ih~';;;o~~~h4~~-~~~rpet. fenced large 2 bedroom-2 bath apartment, low deposit. one month free or prorated over 8 months All bills paid 623-2034 One bedroom and efficiency from S 175 415 Fa1rv1ew Monlrose garage apt. S 150 month. SSO deposit plus ut1httes. Outside deck. on bus line Robert 529-3782 Montrose one bedroom apt in small quiet complex with pool. security gates, laundry facilities, cable available_ Adults No pets $100dep.$265pluselectnc. 713- 529-8178 GREENWAY PLACE APARTMENTS:-- 3333 Cummins. 623-2034 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD -Voice ADv"E'R--T-,s-,~NG~w,.,o=R"K'"s'-­Rent that house or apartment through a Voice Classified. Call 529-8490. And ~~=r8fu1b~C~~~r :i~ne~~~~nMEait~~~~r~i~; Visa. EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTED One or two exciting positions still availa­ble. temfic pay, personality a plus Call Chnstopher Ryan 526-5323. F W Turner & Associates is looking for people who want to sell health/ life/ legal insurance. Will help in licensing, training 522-6558. ESTATE SALES FINDINGS, 2037 Norfo lk. 522-3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD FENCES NORTH STAR FENCE CO .. 694-9113 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD FLOWERS CLASSIC DESIGNS OF HOUSTON, 1811 Indiana. 523-3791 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD (MISC.) FOR SALE KING SIZE BED with canopy Excellent condition $200 negotiable. 952-7650. FOR YARD SALES See ads under "Yard Sales" at the end of the Voice Classifieds FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 1218 Welch, 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CREMATION SERVICE INTERNATIONAL. 692-5555. 363-9999 Sff OUR DISPI A Y AD FURNITURE GALLERY ODEON GALLERY. 2t 17 Dunlavy 521·1111 SEE OUR DISPl..AY AD GIFTS CHRISTMAS CRITTERS. 1318 Nance Sff OUR DISPLAY AD HAULING HAULING, ETC. Pick up and delivery, hauling, bonded Jeff Cunningham. 522-3451 INSTRUCTION CAREER INSTITUTE, 3015 Richmond, 529-2778 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PARALEGAL ·CLASSES • TEA Approved • Tuition Financing • Placement Assistance CAREER INSTITUTE 529-2778 3015 Richmond Ave. INSURANCE AL'S INSURANCE SERVICE 4108 Fannin. 529-0140 Sff OUR DISPLAY AD CYNTHIA H. MANSKER INSURANCE, 3311 W. Alabama #100, 522-2792 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Are your tired of struggling with the high cost of Insurance? Call today for a free competitive quote. Cynthia H. Mansker Insurance Agency 522-2792 Auto e Homeownet'I e R«tl.,. e LHe 11Nnt1•c-rc111 INVESTOR WANTED Need $70,000. terms neQ', ~th real estate. 984-0334 or 754-2414 LAWN CARE BETTER LAWNS & GARDENS, 523- LAWN SEE OUR DISPLAY AO STIXX AN6CHIPS INC., 665-6294, 332-4443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Stixx and Chips, Inc. 665-6294 or 332-4443 We do yards, repair and build wood fences, light hauling, lawn care, light mov­ing, house cleaning, painting, gutters, small house repairs. Free Estimates MEDICAL CARE STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D., 12 Oaks Tower, 4126 SW Fwy #1000, 621 -7771 MILITARY CLOTHES KILROYS. 1723 Waugh, 528-2818 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MODELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS CERTIFIED MASSE~ Legitimate relaxation or remedial. Conve­nient 1ocat1on. reasonable rates 988- 2910. Handsome. he.iihy, honest end mascu: line Masseurs by Marc. 521-042~. Rubdown, your place, $15.00 up. Masc. WM, 47, 5'11'', 150, 7, top. HTLV-3 nega­tive. Safe 35-55, under 23. Handicapped welcome Van. 558-1353. Body rubs by handsome we11-endowed G/W/M 24 hrs. Early evening specials 529-3970 THOM OF HOUSTON 523-6577 Massage: m.uscular, attractive, healthy, hairy, anytime, appointment recom­mended (713) 278-7380 1f you're looking for escorts or masseurs, cell Adam 663-6269 Needing a hot black male escort for a hot, physical and daily workout? Just call and ask for Adam. 663-6269 Call 24 hrs. a day Looking for a small petite elegant young lady for a day 1n the gym or a night out on the town Cell end ask for Falon. 663- 6269 ---A PREMIUM SERVICE Body Rub 24 hrs. 526-3711 Body rubs by Bill, aft_e_r6 _p_m_w_e_e_k-da_y_s-2. -4 hours weekends 529-3970 Stimulating body rubs Out calls. 529- 3970 PALM/TAOROT READING Psychic and Advisor Channeling, Card and Palm Reading• by Anna Marie Wiii AdYI•• on An Aflaln: of lit• lncludlng lov•, H•allh ond Hopplne.1 522-0985 715 Richmond Spedal RHdings $10 PAPER HANGING ALL AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228. SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Paper Hanging and Vinyl Reslgentlal and Commercial All Types Remodeling All AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228 PERSONALS Clean. attractive, adventuresome G/M, 24, 29" waist desires strong, sincere com­panion, 20-30. Let's explore common interests. include address. Reply Blind Ad 336-M c/o Voice. LEATHERMAN SEXLIN_K __ _ Get off with 1000's of Leathermen like you! No phony actors. Private, confiden­tial. No bill to phone but lngldst. One-on­one. man-to-man connections Low-cost 24-hour S&M Hotline. 4151 346-8747 My Ma-;t0r wants oth0r men to serve him. Hank 713-623-2608 Tall blonde. good looking. 36 yr old stud wants to test ~1m.1ts of younger _bondage slave, sadist with independent mind ready to serve. Reply to Blind Box 337-V, c/o Voice. GWM, 22. looking for hot men. 25-35 for friendship, fun times and maybe more Robert 529-3782. Good looking, GWM, 28, seeks other gay men interested in foot tickling. Reply Blind Box 338-R c/o Voice. Lovely, contemporary, mature wo~ indepe.ndent. setUed, creative. Seeking attractive, aggressive woman for discreet c;:ompanionship. Need independent, posi­tive. contemporary, sensitive confidant. Please write and introduce yourself. Reply Bltnd Box 338-S c/o Voice. Wanted Boy with 29" waist, or less. for6', 150 lb .. top, 30" waist. 529-3983 FREE VIDEO MOVIE I will film. a free movie of you and your lover or friend getting ti on. Cell 498-3191. S&M BOTTOM. 928-3318. 33 year old GWM boy looking for GWM daddy for lasting relationship. 680-8009 21 yr old G/H/M seeks a sincere, honest, 20-30 yr old who enjoys all performing and visual arts for a fulfilling relationship ~eply Blind Box 335-M c/o Voice Jn.Eo~Jiq,~i8~roNECTION. 976-9696 LIVE ACTION NETWORK 976-8500 SEE OUR DfSPLA Y AD ' THE MEN'S CONNECTION 976'.2MEN-S,!! OUR D1¥LAY AD ' PLAY ... safely at J 0 E. Meetings 5 nights a week And it's fun (See our other ads) LISA'S RECORDED LOVE STORIES ** SHE WILL WHISPER * SWEET NOTHINGS IN * * YOUR EAR. * * CALL 1-900-410-3600 * : DIRECT 1-900-410-3700 * NOW! 1-900-410-3800 * ** NO MEMBERSHIP NECESSARY * * 50' IOU '''ti ""'"Vie JS• elCPI .IOIJ1110"11 '"'"Vie * * * * * * * * * * RULES FOR THE PE-RSONALS Person­als (~nd other advertising) should not describe or imply a description of sexual organs or acts No Personals should be ~1r&<::ted !~ min~rs Advertising must be positive. not negative" (If you have certain i:_>references m other people, list the que1tt1es you desire Please don't be negative by listing the kinds of people or qualities you don't desire.) Thank you and happy hunting ' APRIL 17, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 The So~.~.;~fI!,Ct.%~~!.~~~ganiza- r ~~~.f~e~~:s~~~~~sa~~~~tli;e A8J1~:~s~~~ I times are S-9pm Tues & Thurs .. 11 pm- SPLASH DAY '87 For tickets and information. Robert 529- 3782 NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOUSE. 1118 1: 4Sam Fri. & Sat., 6-9pm Sun at the Cot- I Ursuhnes. (504) 566-1177 tage Playhouse. 611 Pacific. (Rear of SEE OUR DISPLAY AD house. Look for PlaySafe flag.) I CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Henry's One-Hour Photo has moved to I 408 Avondale. 1n the same building as the Montrose Voice. Open Monday-Friday FRANKLIN GUEST HOUSE. 1620 Franklin, Denver. Co .. (303) 331-9106 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD 9am-6pm SAFE SEX? For your mental health, have sex. For your physical health, make 1t safe sex. Safe sex is where there are no bodily fluids exchanged The virus which leads to an AIDS condition is believed usually trans­mitted from one person to another from blood or semen. Those who are "recep­tive" are especially at risk. Do condoms protect? They cartainly help But con­doms MUST be used with a water-based lubricant (the new product Lubraseptic is especially recommended). Petroleum or vegetable-based lubricants will actually dissolve the condom and eliminate the protection. Please "Play Safe A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads. In their book, "Classified Affairs," they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out, what to expect when you place or respond to an ad, and even what all those funny little abbreviations mean. Send SB to "Classified Affairs," Alyson Pub., Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton, St., Boston. MA 02118.(Also included will be a coupon for $5 off on your next Personals in your choice of 25 publications. including the Voice.) PEST CONTROL TEXAS TERM 0 PEST, 526-1111 SEE OUR DJSPLA Y AD RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL-& PEST CONTROL, 2513' Elmen. 524-9415, 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD 1--------1 TERMITES MUNCHING? 1526-5111 I TfRM11ES 25" o/f I • -.R-O-'CH-ES '3-2" I 1 ~I Rre ..... ~CMwC.....se// 1- _ _ T~s !;R'!2 :!.5T I PETS TOM'S PRETTY FISH, 224 Westheimer, 520-6443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PET CARE PET PLEASERS, 8787 S Gessner-. - 776-3383 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALL' Printing and developing, enlargements, jumbo prints, film, Kodak paper, 2615 Waugh Dr. 520-1010. HENRY'S 1-HOUR PHOTO, 408 Avon­dale, 529-8490 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO PRINTING SPEEDY PRINTING, 5400 Bellaire Blvd, 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PSYCHOLOGISTS JEFF BLACKWELL, RN, MA 3131 East­s1de Su1le 340. 523-8357 DR NICHOLAS EDD. 2t28 Welch, 527- 8680 SEE OUR DIS0 LAY AD Dr. Nicholas Edd, Psy.D PSYCHOLOGIST Insurance Accepted- 24 Hour Phone Service Memona! City Prof Bldg 1 002 F rostwood Ste 269 Houston 77024 465-2377 Montrose. 2128 Welch, 527-8680 RESTAURANTS HUNGRY INTERNATIONAL, 2356 Rice Blvd., 523-8650 SEE OUR DfSPLA Y AD CHARLIE'S, 1102 Westheimer, 522-3332 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CAFE EDI, W Alabama at Shephard, 520-522t SEE OUR DISPLAY AD 'tHE l>O't t>IE Open 24 Hours a Day 1525 Westheimer 528-4350 Specializing In I Chicken •Fish • Pasta I Anytime with this I Coupon I per party of two 520-5221 Shepherd at W. Alabama _I POT Pl E. 1525 Westheimer, 528-4350 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VIET NAM RESTAURANT. 3215 Main at ~Jw·gu~~~J~ AD SELF HELP Gay Men's Network. Rob-526-9064 Steve-869-9952. T erry-622-3956 SUPERMARKETS KROGER, 3300 Montrose SEE OUR DISPLAY AD TIRES THE TIRE PLACE. 1307 Fairview, 529-1414 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ·~~ 529-1414 'I THE 'I It' E PlAC:E ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview - 3 blks West of Montrose TRAVEL San Francisco_ Bed-Breakfast 1n pnvate residences. Comfort. Friendship. Details BayHosts. 1155 Bosworth. 94t31. 415- 337-9632 For all your travel needs, one call does 1t all. Free ticket delivery in Montrose area. Exciting gay destinations, a complete FREE service to you anytime. Robert529- 37A? FRANKLIN HOUSE DENVER 303. 331-9106 520-8108 in Houston for info A Guest House at 1620 Franklin Denver, CO 80218 Rates: $14-$18 Single. From $20 Double TYPESETTING SAME DAY TYPESETTERS, 408 Avondale, 529-08490 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VIDEO LOBO VIDEO, 1424-C Westheimer. 522-5156 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VIDEO TAPE COPY INC., 3013 Founta1nv1ew. 781-0033 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD o?J VHS & BETA RENTALS 1 tape $4 2 tapes $7 3 tapes $10 Every Wednesday Is "on the house." Questions- Call LOBO at 522-5156 YARD & GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce it here then stand back for the crowd Call 529-8490 or visit the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement. ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classified rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here "by the inch." Since these are considered "Display Ads," not "Classified Ads," you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles. REGULAR RATE 1" $34 2" $44 3" $54 1 AD PER WEEK for 4 WEEKS RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 1 AD PER WEEK for 13 WEEKS RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 1 AD PER WEEK for 26 WEEKS RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 The Montrose Voice It's The Place to Advertise Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose • 28 MON TROSE VOICE I APRIL 17, 1987
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