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Montrose Voice, No. 336, April 3, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 336, April 3, 1987 - File 001. 1987-04-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11029/show/11000.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-04-03). Montrose Voice, No. 336, April 3, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11029/show/11000

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 336, April 3, 1987 - File 001, 1987-04-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11029/show/11000.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 336, April 3, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 3, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript montrose 'Run to ~ End AIDS' m=r Arriving APR IL 3, -1_9-8:7_-_-_is_s:u~E_-_3~3-6_-_-_-_- _- _-_-_ -_-! ~ i J ~ 3 in Houston News, inside HOUSTON WEEKEND WEATHER: Fair and cold at night, low near 40. Warm and sunny days, high near 70. Reagan Speaks on AIDS-Finally U.S., France Agree on Joint AIDS Program News, inside Your Royal Majesties A New York Affair News, inside National Group Seeks Accurate Portrayals of Homosexuals News, inside A Blind Date The Voice at the Movies Bill O'Rourke, inside Gay Gets TV 'riille After Robison Attack DALLAS (UPI)-Two supporters ofBill Nelson, a gay rights activist who is run­ning for City Council, Thursday taped a :lO-minute response to televised attacks made by an evangelist and a local <level· oper. In a program aired Tuesday by three Dallas UHF television stations, the Rev. ,Jame's Robison and Jim Williams • Jr. said homosexuals were trying to take control of the City Council and citt>d thr candidacy of Nelson, president of the Dallas Gay Alliance. Robison also said he did not believe Nelson could truthfully take the oath of office to uphold city and state laws, including the sodomy law, Wayburn said. Nrlson's campaign petitioned the Federal Communications Commission, citing thr Fairness Doctrine. "Our defense is that we should be entitJ(•d to equal time to explain how Mr. Nelson appeals to a broad range of peo­ple," said Willian Wayburn, Nelson's campaign manager. KDFI-TV agreed to provide 30 min­utes of air time. KLTJ-TV, which aired the Robison program twice. agreed to provide one hour. The third station, KDTX, said Robison and Williams' dis­cussions of homosexuality lasted Jess than five minutes, and that is how much time the station agreed to give Nelson's campaign . Wayburn said if the station did not provide 30 minutes' response time, Ne!- son's campaign would appeal to the FCC. Wayburn said Thursday night that Nelson's response was a 30-minute dis­cussion between Charlotte Taft, direc­tor of the Routh Street Women's Clinic and a member of the Dallas Area Women's Political Caucus. and Ann Brown, a school teacher and Nelson volunteer. KL T J has agreed to broadcast the tape twice on Friday. KDFI-planned to air it at 6:00 a.m. Friday, Wayburn said. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Court Will Hear Flynt vs. Fal'Well developed over the past 20 years and claims of emotional distress will sup­plant defamation in suits brought by public figures. By Henry J. Reske UPI Supreme Court Reporter WASHINGTON-The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide if the Rev. Jerry Falwell can collect $200,000 for emotional distress from smut magnate Larry Flynt for a Hustler Magazine ad parody that a jury decided did not libel the television evangelist. The court will hear arguments next term in the case brought by Flynt seek­ing review of a ruling by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The case caused much concern among the media and other defenders of the First Amendment's guarantee of free­dom of speech and the press because of the appeal panel's finding that a person who was not libeled can nonetheless col­lect a substantial award for suffering emotional distress. The claim of emotional distress, according to court documents, is being made frequently in libel cases and the fear is that if the award stands many will collect large sums of money from sympathic jurors for published material merely because 1t is upsetting. Political satire has long been a staple of American commentary-having its roots in England-and has been given wide protection from libel claims. "Opinions are often distress­inducing, calculated to provoke and dis­turb, often in emotionally incendiary language," wrote the publishers of the Richmond, Va., Times-Dispatch, Rich­mond, Va., News Leader and t he Frede­ricksburg, Va., F ree Lance Star newspapers in a petition in support of Flynt. "But opinions do not forfeit their First Amendment protection merely because they are harsh, indecent, or indecorous. ... Punishment of speech because it is intended to cause emotional distress threatens the country's long tradition of robust political and social satire," they contended. The libel case began with the publica­tion in November 1983 of an ad parody of an advertising campaign for Cam­pari Liqueur. In the real advertisements celebritites talk about their "first time." San Antonio Blood Agency Criticized By Renne Hain~s SAN ANTONIO (UPI}--The opening Tuesday of a for-profit blood collection agency prompted accusations its owners were trying to capitalize on the AIDS scare. But officials for American Blood Stor­age in San Antonio said they were offer­ing an alternative to a variety of risks associated with anonymous blood transfusions by offering to collect and store a customer's own blood. "We have had the question posed to us, are we taking advantage of the AIDS fear. I believe all AIDS has done is increase the public awareness of transfusion-related problems," said James West, president of the new com­pany. "We believe the public has theright to have an option to choose something like this, just as they choose cancer insu­rance or anything else," West said. The first day's customers ranged in age from the 20s to 60s, with most sign­ing up as a precautionary measure, not because they were anticipating elective surgery in the near future, West said. For a fee, the company will draw the customer's own blood, freeze it and store it for as long as seven years for use by the customer, designated relatives or others in the event of elective surgery. The hours-long thawing process pre­vents the use of the stored blood in emer­gency situations. The company also offers short-term storage of fresh blood supplies for custo­mers anticipating elective surgery in the near future. And the company will make home or office visits to collect blood. About 15 similar personal blood banks have opened around the country in recent months. American Blood Stor­age plans to open other facilities in the next year in Dallas and Denver. While public blood banks long have allowed autologous donations, allowing patients needing transfusions to receive their own blood, West said the facilities discourage long-term storage for indi­viduals not anticipating surgery "They have an enormous task in pro­viding the emergency blood needed There is a lot of scheduling and capital involved in catering to specific needs like this. That's where we differ," he said. A person's own blood is the safest, West said. While the screening of all public blood donations for acquired immune defi­ciency syndrome has eliminated the chances of a patient contracting the deadly disease from a blood transfu­sion, West said no screening test is 100 percent accurate. Other infectious diseases, such as hepatitis, can be contracted through transfusions from anonymous donors despite screening, he said, also citing the risks of allergic reactions. Dr. Norman Kalmin, chiefofthe non­profit South Texas Regional Blood Bank, said his facility already allows autologous donations. "The only difference between us and them is we stress the fact there should be a medical need for pre-deposited blood in view of the fact that very few people ever require a blood transfu­sion," Kalmin said. The costs for collec­tion and storage of pre-deposited blood is about the same. Since only about3 percent of the popu­lation requires blood transfusions in a lifetime, Kalmin said pre-storing blood would be a waste in most cases. No new cases of transfusion-related AIDS have been reported since blood banks began screening blood for its presence two years ago, he said, and new tests have been introduced to screen for the presence of hepatitis. Dr. David Gordon, a San Antonio blood specialist, said the opening offor­profit blood banks may only aggravate people's fears. "I think the fear of AIDS is what's prompted someone to feel there is a profit to be made," said Gordon, who is chairman of blood banking and related services for the Bexar County Medical Society. "I think this creates a good deal of fear and panic in patients who other­wise may need blood and may be able to use it quite safely," Gordon said. "There are risks of hepatitis ... but those risks are very limited." They mean their first encounter with Campari, but there is a double-entendre with a sexual connotation. In the Huster parody, Falwell, the well-known television preacher and commentator on political issues who recently took control of Jim and Tammy Bakker's PTL Club, is the celebrity. The fictional encounter is supposed to be his first and it takes place while drunk on Campari in an outhouse and with his mother. Falwell sued for libel, invasion of pri­vacy and in tentional infliction of emo­tional distress. A federal jury found against Falwell on the libel claim because the ad was clearly marked a parody and the court ruled against the invasion of privacy claim. However, the jury returned an award of $200,000 on the emotional distress claim. The award was upheld by the appeals court in August 1986. Seeking high court review, attorneys for Flynt said that "First Amendment defenses applicable to libel must also apply to claims of intentional infliction of emotional distress when such claims are based upon alleged libels." They said the appeals court specifi­cally rejected the defense the satire was published without actual malice, defined in the historic 1964 Supreme Court decision in New York Times vs. Sullivan as material published without knowledge of falsity or reckless disre­gard for the truth, as well as the defense that the "parody consisted of protected opinion and rhetorical hyperbole." The attorneys warned if the award is altowed to stand it will upset libel law "If the court of appeals' holding remains the law, nobody will dare speak with ill will toward a public figure," they said. Arguing against review, attorneys for Falwell said: "The outrageous publica­tion involved in this case ... cannot pos­sibly compare with the barbs of political cartoonists or the scathing pen of muck­rakers." "From a policy point of view, a line must be drawn to accommodate those rare instances of intentional wrongdo­ing which do not strictly fit within the libel mold." In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice STRM NGFOR POSITIVE CHANGE ... >S a process of growth Deal with personal problems within a caring atmosphere DR. NICHOIAS EDD, PsyD. Psychologist • 1nd1v1dua1 Md famrly thet.!PY • rerat1onsh1p counseling • b1ofeedbock and stress mana~ment • habit d1sord~rs tsmoking'dfetl • court evaluations Memorial City Professional Bldg. 1 902 Frostwood Suite 269 Houston, TX 77024 465-2377 Montrose: 2123 Welch 527-8680 - Houston 77019 • 24 hour phone service • 1nsuran¢e welcome • evenings and weekends available Accepting Sanus and Human Enhance personal growth with professional support §AME DAY TYPE- § ETTER§ A NEW DIVIHION OJ<' THI<~ MONTROSE VOICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads·­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get ,it to us .by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we 11 have 1t ready by Spm (size of the JOb permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT! If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes, you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) 8 1 TYPEST YLES TO CHOOSE PROM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 ' Run to End AIDS Arriving in Houston Brent Nicholson Earle, now with fewer than 5,000 miles remaining in the Amer­ican Run for the End of AIDS (A.RE.A.), will arrive in Houston April 8. Ea rle, a New York city playwright, is on the fin al half of a 10,000-mile run around the perimeter of the U.S. to pro­mote AIDS education and prevention and to deliver the message " with educa­tion, y;e can stop the spread of AIDS and the fear of AIDS-now." The healthy, 35-year-old ath lete began his trip in New York City on March 1, 1986. He has since run approx­imately 20 miles a day for 20 months through 22 states. Response to the runner, accompa nied by a .caravan consisting of a car and a Winnebago, has ranged from "We love you" and "Keep going" to "Hope you die, faggot." Having trained himself to ignore most taunts a long the route, Earle is especia lly bothered by hecklers who espound death wishes upon AIDS vic­tims. One of the main reasons Earle decided to embark on this education/ awareness project is because he has lost some 30 friends to AIDS. The Rockport, N.Y., native also hopes to use the run to generate funds for the National AIDS Network. Other than basic living expenses, he receives no compensation. He hopes to arrive in Washington, D.C., by Oct. 11 in time to join the National Gay Rights March on the Capitol. He expects to arrive back in New York City in the beginning of November. Earle will arrive in Houston Wednes­day, April 8. According to an itinerary released by the AIDS Foundation Hous­ton, Inc., he will a ddress the Houston Gay Political Caucus that evening. On Thursday, April 9, he will tour McAdory House and Omega House. There will be a party at Heaven, 925 Hyde Park, at 9:00 p.m. The run crew will be present to talk about their expe­riences on the road. Heaven will donate all door receipts to the AIDS Founda­tion. A.RE.A T-shirts and buttons will be available for purchase and pledge cards will be distributed. A press conference will be held at the AIDS Foundation office, 3927 Essex Lane, at 10:00 a.m. Friday, April 10. At 11:15 a.m., Earle will begin his run from Memoria l Drive at 610 to City Hall where he is due to arrive at 1:30 p.m. There will be no run on Saturday. T­shirts will be autographed at Hit & Run, 2005 W. Gray, from 11:30 a .m.-1:00 p.m.; TNT Shirts, 2400 Taft, 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.; and Manhattan Cards, 1412 Wes­theimer, 3:00-4:30 p.m. On Sunday, April 12, Earle will speak to the congregation of Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection at 10:45 a.m. and Wheeler Avenue Bap- Brent Nicholson Earle: Running for the End of AIDS tist Church at 12:45 p.m. Sunday's activities will conclude with a reception at the Magnolia Room, 715 Franklin. Non-perishable food items to be donated to the AIDS Foundation "Stone Soup" pantry will be accepted. The Houston run will take Earle from Memorial Drive at 610 to Shepherd, south on Shepherd to Westheimer, east on Westheimer to Montrose, north on Montrose to Allen Parkway, and east on Allen Parkway to City Hall. Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. UH GLSA Adds Additional Weekly Meeting The Gay/ Lesbian Student Association at the University of Houston has added an addi­tional weekly meeting. The first GLSA alternate meeting will be held Monday.April 4, at 7:15 p.m. in the UC. Students are asked to check banners for room location. The alternate meeting time is in response to increased interest and is meant to accomodate night students and those whose daytime schedules do not allow them to attend regular meetings The Viet Nam Restaurant and Andy presents the Finest Food in town at the Best Prices Lunch or Dinner Special $12 a couple Choice of Appetizer, Entree, Dessert, with complimentary sake Open: 11am-10pm Sun., 11am­midnlght M-F, 11am-2am Sat. 3215 Main at Elgin 526-0917 APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 -Now Open Daily 4pm-2am; Sat. & Sun. noon-2am Beer Bust Friday: 6pm-midnight with Free Hot Dogs Sunday: 4pm-midnight 2517 Ralph Street at Westheimer 527-9071 Just Arrived! Hermit Crabs in Beautiful Shells Medium Exotic Crab & She11-s210ea. Crab in Mickey Mouse Shell-S375ea. Crab in Mother of Pearl Shell-5450ea. Exquisite Shells trimmed in 24 kt. Gold with Crab-5600ea. Also at booth at Mary's Vacant Lot Saturday April 4 Tom's Pretty Fish 224 Westheimer 6 Blocks from Main Street 520-6443 CRAB LICE STUD1-.Y---~-.-- .mR-T-----( Baylor College of Medicine Department of Dermatology is conducting a study of a new crab lice treatment. Volunteers may be male or female, between 18-65 years old, and diagnosed as having crab lice within the last 24 hours. Volunteers will be compensated. Call 799-6137. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Was Tammy Having a Realationship with Singer Gary Paxton? WASHINGTON (UPl)-Tammy Faye Bakker's relationship with a country singer led her husband, former PTL evangelist Jim Bakker, to a sexual encounter with a church secretary to "show his masculinity," The Washing­ton Post reported Thursday. Gary Paxton, a Grammy Award­winning singer-songwriter whose songs include "Alley Oop" and "Monster Mash," helped produce Mrs. Bakker's albums in the late 1970s and often the two worked late into the night in a recording studio in Nashville, Tenn., the Post said. "(Mrs. Bakker) was in love with Gary, or thought she was, and she knew I knew it," said Karen Paxton, now divorced from the singer, who was her fourth husband. Gary Paxton, a brawny, bearded, colorfully dressed entertainer, told the Post that he and Mrs. Bakker were "just friends," but added, "You're with some­body a lot and become too close a friend sometimes, then realize you're too close and quit." The newspaper also quoted Jamie Buckingham, a columnist for Cha­risma, a Pentecostal magazine, as say­ing the Bakkers confirmed that the evangelist's 1980 fling with Jessica Hahn was prompted by Mrs. Bakker's relationship with Paxton. In an interview with the Post, Buck­ingham quoted Mrs. Bakker as saying that "there had been absolutely nothing sexual about it ... He was just someone to talk to, a guy who would listen to me." Paraphrasing what the Bakkers told him about Mrs. Bakker's relationship with Paxton, Buckingham told the newspaper, "She was lonely and her husband wasn't paying any attention to her. It was a blow to Jim Bakker's masculinity that his wife had to find another man to talk to. It was the natu­ral thing for him to try and show his masculinity" with Hahn. Jim Bakker, who was in Charlotte, N.C., concentrating on building his tele­vision ministry at the time, got word of his wife's close association with Paxton and was "afraid" they were having an affair, said Linda Wilson, Mrs. Bakker's former private secretary. Karen Paxton said that soon after she began "picking up vibes" between Mrs. Bakker and Paxton, Mrs. Bakker called her and asked for a souvenir-the Pax­tons' pillow. "I just want it because it belongs to y'all," she quoted Mrs. Bakker as saying. Wilson told the Post that Bakker first sent roses to his wife when he felt her affections were wandering, then he refused to allow Paxton, his former friend, to appear on his TV show. Karen Paxton told the Post that Bakker repeatedly called her former husband and accused him of having an affair with Mrs. Bakker. "After Gary got over the initial shock, he was so mad he told Jim, 'You short son of a bitch, come on down here to Nashville and I'll pound you in the ground."' Eventually Paxton sent Bakker an eight-page letter begging forgiveness, which the minister returned unopened, the newspaper said, quoting Wilson. Bakker resigned from PTL, which means "Praise the Lord" and "People That Love," on March 19, first citing the encounter with Hahn, but later saying fellow Assemblies of God television evangelist Jimmy Swaggart was trying to take over his ministry. . CD §.!usTIC INDUSTRIES Fal"Well Under Attack for Fund-Raising Project By United Press International Evangelist Jerry Falwell, who newly agreed to head the PTL ministry shaken by Jim Bakker's sex scandal, has been accused of raising $3.2 million for fam­ine relief in Africa while actually spend­ing only a fraction of it on the program. Falwell came under fire in a U.S. News & World Report story last Sunday saying he raised $3.2 million in 1985-86 for famine relief in Sudan, but spent only $300,000_:_mostly to send 15 col­lege students there to refurbish a camp and to buy trucks for the project. The magazine said Falwell raised $740,000 from four Moral Majority appeals and $2.5 million from other Fal­well groups. Falwell told the magazine the $2.5 million figure was "absolutely ridicu­lous." His spokesman, Mark Demoss, added the organization had been "com­mitted to a 10-year famine relief project in the Sudan that was cut short by about nine years because of political turmoil." According to State Department cables and key Falwell aides, the maga­zine said, the operation never directly distributed any food in Sudan because of obstruction against such aid by the Sudanese government. Falwell's project was "unable to per­form any services in Sudan," the maga­zine quoted an Oct. 3, 1985, internal State Department cable as saying. At his Thomas Road Baptist Church in Lynchburg, Va., Sunday, Falwell referred repeatedly to the $172 million PTL empire he took over March 19 when founder Bakker resigned in a sex scan­dal that shook some of the giants of tele­vision evangelism and the Assemblies of God church. "There are people today just rejoicing in this scandal," Falwell said. "But sin is not something new that was invented with Jim Bakker." Falwell on Saturday raised the possi­bility of a criminal investigation in the PTL sex scandal, telling the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that "when you get to paying extortion money, that's real close to the edge, especially if it's not your money." It was the first time Falwell had used the word "extortion" in comments about the Bakker affair. Oklahoma City evangelist John Wes­ley Fletcher told the Charlotte (N.C.) Observer he urged church secretary Jes­sica Hahn, who had been a babysitter for Fletcher's children, to meet Bakker for a sexual tryst in 1980 because he feared the PTL leader was suicidal. Fletcher, by his own admission an alcoholic at the time, said Bakker threa­tened suicide unless he found a way to make his wife, Tammy, jealous and win back her affections. The Los Angeles Times reported Sun­day that Bakker's representatives repeatedly contacted Hahn and warned her not to talk about her encounter with the PTL founder. The article also said Hahn, who was reportedly paid $265,000 for her silence, was coerced into signing a confession saying she seduced Bakker. The Times story also referred to an alleged taped account of Hahn's tryst with Bakker, which John Stewart, who represented Hahn in talks with PTL Grave Advice for 'Holy Warriors' CHARLESTON, W.Va. (UPl)-A mon­ument firm used a tombstone in its dis­play window to offer some timely advice to battling factions in the "holy war" of television preachers. Sears Monument Co., keeping up its tradition of using a grave marker to comment on current events, used stick­on letters Thursday to spell out the names Swaggart, Falwell, Gorman, Bakker, and Roberts on the tombstone. "There is only one," the monument says, advising all five "holy warriors" to read Matthew 7:1. The verse warns, "Judge not, that ye be not judged." offici'l, described as "National Enquirer stuff." North Carolina Assemblies of God officials, instructed to investigate the Bakker scandal by their denomination headquarters in Springfield, Mo., indi­cated last Sunday they would be unable to start their investigation this past week. Members of the state governing board tried to schedule a meeting Tuesday, but some of the 16 board members could not attend. "We need them all together when you have something like this," said board member Fred Sorrels of Franklin, N.C. montrose VOICE HOUSTON. TEXAS ISSUE 336 FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 1987 Published weekly Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1987 Office hours: 8am-6pm Henry MCCiurg pub/lsher-ecJJtor Linda Wyche managing editor David Roumfort production SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 AovEAr1S1NG SAL'Es DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland 1advert1smg director Ken Bogel account executive ~-~~- ~~~~~~ POSTMASTER Send address corrections to 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 77006~3028 Subscr1pt1on rate m US {by Voice carrier or US Mall) $1 25 per wook (up 10 2 tSsues). $65 per year (52weeks). or $32 50 per SI)( months (26 weeks) Nat1on11l adverti:1mg representative R1vendell Marketing p O Box 1268. Pla1nheld. NJ 07061 . (201) 754-4348 Final advertising deadline All display ads 5pm 2 days pnor to publ1c111on date Allcl1s51l1edads2pm 1 day pnor 10 pubhca11on date Notice to advertiser& Advertising rate schedule Eight-A was elfec11ve April 11. 1986 Re!!pon11b111ty Wedo not assume f1nanc1al respons1b11tty tor claims by adverllsers but readers are asked to advise the nt>wspaper ot any suspicion ol fradulent or deceptive advertising and suspicions will be invest1ga1ed New!! service United Press International ~~~~~~~~ cln Jallemoriam DAVID RAYMOND BURKHART David Raymond Burkhart, 46, died March 26, 1967. David was a senior systems ana­lyst with HBO/ Medi flex and a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He was past treasurer of Dignity/ Houston. David and his partner, Patrick, were founding general chair-couple of Couples/ Houston and founding hospitality couple for the Couples National Network. Survivors include his father, Harold Burk­hart; sisters, Penny Jensen and Pamela Pepper; niece. Michelle Jensen, all of Rochester. NY , and his partner, Patrick E. Nugent of Houston. Visitation was held Sunday and Monday evenings at Earthman's Downtown Chapel A memorial mass was celebrated Monday evening, March 30 at Dignity Center, Rev. Pat Meister, celebrant. Private committal services. Donations may be made to Dignity/ Houston Building Fund, P 0. Box 66621, Houston, Texas 77266. GREGORY STEVE RESO Gregory Steve Reso, 27, died March 29, 1967 due to complications arising from AIDS. Survivors include parents, Sidney and Patricia Reso, Morris Township, N.J.; brother, Christopher Matthew Reso. San Francisco. CA., sisters, Robin Reso, Hous­ton, Cyd Reso, San Francisco. and Renee Reso. Brunswick, Maine, and paternal grandmother, Agnes Reso. New Orleans, LA Family received friends at Earthman Bel­laire Chapel from 6:00-6:00 p.m. Monday. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Tuesday, March 31, 1967 at St. Michael's Catholic Church, 1601 Sage with Rev. Don Neumann and Rev Msgr. John Perusina concelebrants. Private committal services. In lieu of usual remembrances, memor­ials may be made to Omega House, 2615 Waugh Dri., Suite 266, Houston, TX 77006 Earthman Bell ai re Chapel, 6700 Ferris, 667-6505. --- - OUR POLICY The Mon1rose Voice 11 honored to commemorate the llv• of our readeB . and friends or relatives of our readers. with ar announcement Friends or relahves should provide us with 1nf0<m11 11on 1n person (not by mail or over the phone) There is no Charge 101 th11 service APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 ····························•--:--.... --- .... - .... --_..._, - _, ~!!~~~'!~~~~~m~f.!?!.!~i $ 1 QOO ! ~~~!~~;,~;,:~;;,;~~;~~~;:~;.;=~;~~:,o;f:~:~:,~~~;;: ! off ! a better method. I The prize in the tournament will be a night at the upcoming Virginia Slims of Houston I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to Tennis Tournament, which will be held later this month. Martina Navratilova and other top I d. fa S IO()() ff J players are entered. your next Or er r · 0 I HTC member Dimples Espinosa is chairing the club tournament. Entry fee will be the I any of the following items: I club's. regular $4 court fee for Sunday play. Espinosa can be reached by ca."ing 523~2636 (Minimum Order $50) (evenings). Regular club play will meet as usual on other courts. More 1nformat1on is I available by calling Rich Corder at 524-2151. • Letterheads • Postcards .. HOGS in April Every Sunday in April, except Easter, members of the Houston Outdoor Group will take wildflower viewing bicycle trips from Stephen F. Austin Park outside San Felipe. Each ride will be approximately 2-2'~ hours of cycling time on flat to moderately hilly terrain. At the finish, the group will lunch at the park. Carpools leave Houston at 8:00 a.m. Participants are asked to arrive by 7:30 a.m. for transportation arrangements and fresh coffee. Randy Cumbaa. 681-5679, has more information. Other HOG events for April are: Marguerita Nile-April 10, 6:00 p.m., Two Pesos, Kirby and Southwest Freeway; Wildflower Car Trip-April 17-18. Info: Don. 552-7609; Camping Trip-April 16-19, San Antonio Fiesta weekend. Info: Bruce, 961-2905; Roller Skating-April 21, Carousel Rink, Blalock exit on the Katy Freeway, 6:00 p.m.; Movie Night- The Day the Earth Stood Still, Info: Larry, 521-3641. .. Frontrunners Have Busy Weekend Members of Frontrunners Houston spent a busy weekend at two out-of-town events. Two members competed in Texas Triathlon Six at College Station on Saturday, March 26. The course consisted of a one kilometer swim. 10 kilometer run and a 30 kilometer bike ride. Randy C. completed the course in 2:32 and Joe M. finished in 2:34. Randy reports the weather was hot but the event was well organized. He felt it was an excellent event for the novice triathlete. As the weather turned cooler Sunday, March 29, six members traveled to Austin to run the Capitol 10,000. This race is well known as one of the largest 10K races in the country. Each year more than 25,000 runners participate in the event The next Frontrunner event is the Heart and Sole Run, a three mile race on Sunday, April 12. Individuals interested in participating in the race, joining the group, or receiving more information may call Steve Rheinecker at 663-7761 . • Brochures • Multipart Forms, I • 2-Color Printing • Flyers I • Contracts • Menus I • Resumes • Envelopes I •Announcements • Invitations 1 . • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet I Copying• Invoices I MONTROSE BUSl~ESS GUILD I MEMBERS may substitute 10% Discount I --=-- SPEEDY I PRINTING SERVICE I OF T E J<AS Fast Reliable Service, ! "'"""~ Excellent Quality, low Cost I -~· 5400B BLEVUDA. IRE 1 Convenient Southwest location I : block e-ast or Ctwmty Rcxk .-.: ~ CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY I I MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD; I GREATER BEUAIRE CHl'.MBER OF COMMERCE • p~.,e. ~coupon per customer and/or order. carrot I •:.e comblnt'rl with other d&ounts ex special o~. ....------- ----...l CJ) a.. :w:> z ::> 1- ~ :0 () 0 z 0 Rendezvous Club (The Old Boobie Rock) Tel. 527-8619 (.) a AUTOMOTIVE :! ~ SPRING SPECIAL ~ ~ Air Conditioning GJ _J w Check & Charge 26.95 Oil & Lube 24.95 Cooling System Service 27.95 1411 Ti.ft (i®:f.®. 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS 1100 Westheimer Monday-Saturday 9am-5am Sunday 3pm-5am Monday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Tuesday 6ctro.1 • Friday & Saturday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Disco Beats of George from early hours and after hours til dawn! Direct Burial or Cremation 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Wednesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Sunday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 3pm-9pm CREIDATlOil SERlJlCE lilTERilATlOilAL® Operated by James H. Murphy Funeral Homes prlt~~~ $395 I-~ 363-9999 Thursday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm After Hours Every Night Dance until Dawn Daily 6 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Race for AIDS Vaccine Intensifies By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON-Three teams of scientists have asked the government for permission to begin limited human testing of possible AIDS vaccines, beginning a new stage in a search expected to take at least five more years, the government said March 26. Food and Drug Administration spo­kesman Brad Stone confirmed the agency had received applications from three groups of scientists to begin test­ing the safety of vaccine candidates in humans. In addition, Dr. Anthony Fauci, direc­tor of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he knew of five or six other teams that are ready to seek testing approval from the FDA. After testing the compounds to see if they cause unacceptable side effects, researchers must apply for permission to begin a new round of trials in larger groups of people to determine whether the vaccines actually prevent infection with the AIDS virus. That, they agreed, is the hard part. It would be unethical to expose a human intentionally to the virus, said Dr. Peter Fischinger, deputy director of the National Cancer Institute, so effi­cacy testing will rely to a certain extent on chance. Participants who receive vaccines would be told what they are getting and counseled to do everything they can to avoid coming into contact with the AIDS virus, "but nevertheless human U.S., France Agree on Joint AIDS Program WASHINGTON (UPl)-President Rea­gan and French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac announced a joint agreement Tuesday to cooperate in find­ing a vaccine or a cure for AIDS. Reagan said the agreement covering research , education and technology exchanges has been reached between the Department of Health and Human Services and the Pasteur Institute that resolves the differences between the two countries over the patent rights for the acquired immune deficiency syndrome antibody test kit. "The two medical groups will share the patent and each party will contrib­ute 80 percent of the royalties receive to establish and support an international AIDS Research Foundation," the presi­dent said. "This foundation which will also raise private funds, will sponsor AIDS related research and will donate 25 per­cent of the funds they receive to educa­tion and research problems in less developed countries," he added. "This agreement opens a new era in Franco-American cooperation, allow­ing France and the United States to join their efforts to control this terrible dis­ease in the hopes of speeding the devel­opment of a vaccine or cure," he said. Chirac said, "I just want to add how glad I am about this agreement to fight against this terrific disease. We will now work together and also create a foundation to work against AIDS." He called it a "good step" and said he was "glad" to have the accord. Koop, in a televised interview Sun­day, said a vaccine probably won't be available for several years. "A cure, I think, is very problematical," Koop said. "A vaccine for this very compli­cated virus-I don 't think it's in the cards for this century." nature will take over," he said. Some people in each group will proba­bly pursue risky behavior, such as hav­ing sex with a high-risk person without condoms, and determining whether a vaccine works could boil down to deter­mining whether more unvaccinated people than vaccinated people become infected. Fauci said people in safety studies may only have to be observed for three months to a year after vaccination for researchers to determine the effects of a vaccine, but studying efficacy will take longer. How much longer, "I don't know," Fauci said. Fischinger suggested at least three to four years. It often takes at least that long after infection for symp-toms of acquired immune deficiency syndrome to start. The comments were made during an AIDS vaccine symposium sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, of which Fauci's agency is a branch. Other problems with vaccination will be determining whether a vaccine that seems to protect one population, such as test subjects in Africa, will protect oth­ers, and developing one vaccine that will protect against the many varia­tions of the AIDS virus. Dr. Robert Gallo, a top AIDS researcher and head of the National Cancer lnstitute's tumor cell biology laboratory, said it may be possible to combine a half-dozen compounds, each one acting against several different •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Building­Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKENDS Another D~ S~A Enterprise ... K.J. 's ~~ NORTHSIDE Mon-Fri Happy Hour 12-7pm s1so Well & s1 Beer Friday-No Cover-Party, Party Party Saturday-Cash Drawing SUNDAY Lip Synch Contest 10pm, Anyone Can Enter, Cash Prizes MONDAY Airline Night-s1 Bar Drinks and Beer for Airline Employees Tuesday-Pool Tournament 8pm $4 Entry Fee Wednesday-All Night Happy Hour s1so Well & s1 Draft WELCOME KIEDREN (FORMERLY OF CHEERS) TO OUR STAFF Come by and see our New Look! 11830 AIRLINE-445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldine- Bender) virus variations, into one vaccine. lt may also be possible to induce the body's immune system to battle many different virus variations when stimu­lated by one compound. Most vaccines so far are based on fragments of the AIDS virus' outer pro­tein coat. One compound, however, is based on a bit of protein from the inner core. This particular compound, deve­loped by Dr. Allan Goldstein, chairman of biochemistry at George Washington University, and colleagues, is one of the three under review at the FDA. The agency is not permitted to identify the other applicants. Some researchers are skeptical about the product, but Gallo said, "I think the Goldstein data merits watching." IN INTERNATIONAL MILITARY FAS HIONS FRENCH* GERMAN* ITALIAN -.-: WWil VINTAGE * COME ~~ THE FASHION ARMY AT ..•.. ~~L~~o INTERNATIONAL MILITARY SURPLUS HDQRS. MON··SAT 11·6 528 -2118 young, &prou§fY Gay teenagers have no place to go with their questions. Here is a can­didly written book addressing such concerns as: Am I really gay? What should I tell my parents? Is it a good idea to come out in school? How can I tell if my best friend is gay? YOUNG, GAY AND PROUD! $3. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. 0 Here is $4.00 for Young, Gay and Proud! 0 Here is $8.00 for one copy each of Young, Gay and Proud! and One Teenager in Ten: Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth, in which teens tell their own stories. name. address city ------------ state ____;:ip ___ _ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 '----··--·- --~--- 8 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Second Virus IIllplicated in AIDS-Related Cancers rr---------il iiET PLEASERS 8787 So. Gessner off Hwy_ 59 By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON-A form of cancer suf­fered by many AIDS victims may be caused by another virus altogether­not the generally suspected AIDS virus infection or resulting immune system damage, a top researcher reports. Dr. Robert Gallo, head of the National Cancer Institute tumor cell biology laboratory, said March 26 evidence points to another virus as the possible cause of Kaposi's sarcoma and other cancers that occur in AIDS victims. The overwhelming majority of Kapo­si's sarcoma victims are promiscuous homosexual males, Gallo said, and if the cancer were a simple result of AIDS, more of the victims from other risk groups would be affected. "I believe the cancers arise independ­ently and have nothing to do with the (AIDS) virus," he said during an AIDS vaccine conference at the National Institutes of Health, parent organiza­tion of the NCI. It is only remotely possible the same genetic flaw could give rise to the cancer, he said, so whatever it is must be environmental-and that suggests a virus. Some research with mice tends to support this theory, he added. "If it is a virus, it must be a virus that has yet to be discovered," Gallo told his scientific colleagues. Scientists have been meeting for two days to hear presentations from researchers involved in the search for a vaccine to prevent infection with the AIDS virus and the fatal syndrome that results. Three teams of scientists have asked the government for permission to begin limited human testing of possible vac­cines, the government confirmed Thurs­day. After testing the compounds to see if they cause unacceptable side effects, researchers must apply for permission to begin a new round of trials in larger groups of people to determine whether the vaccines actually prevent infection. It would be unethical to expose a human intentionally to the virus to test a vaccine, said Dr. Peter Fischinger, deputy director of the NCI, so efficacy testing will rely to a certain extent on chance. Participants who receive vaccines Book Store Manager Convicted of Obscenity CORPUS CHRISTI (UPI}-A jury has convicted a book store manager of promoting obscenity by selling a maga­zine that contained explicit homosexual literature to an undercover agent. Nueces County court-at-law Judge Robet Vargas ordered a pre-sentencing investigation and scheduled sentencing of Mark Alan West, 27, for April 6. The Class B misdemeanor is punishable by up to 180 days in jail and a maximum $1,000 fine. "I hope this verdict sends a message to anybody who is dealing in this type of literature," said prosecutor Carlos Val­dez after the jury of four men and two women returned the verdict March 26. "It is a very strong message. West was arrested on Dec. 17 after bixizen complaints sparked an under­cover investigation of the Half Price Books outlet. would be told what they are getting and counseled to do everything they can to avoid coming into contact with the AIDS virus, "but nevertheless human nature will take over," Fischinger said. three months to a year after vaccination for researchers to determine the effects of a vaccine, but studying efficacy will take longer. How much longer "I don't know," Fauci said. Fischinger suggested at least three to four years. It often takes at least that long after infection for symp­toms of AIDS to start. 776-3383 Open Mon.-Sat. 15 Years Grooming Experience by Billy (Dogs & Cats) Some people in each group will proba­bly pursue risky behavior, experts say, such as having sex with a high-risk per­son without condoms, and determining whether a vaccine works could boil down to determining if more unvacci­nated people than vaccinated people become infected. Other problems with vaccination will be determining whether a vaccine that seems to protect one population, such as test subjects in Africa, will protect oth­ers, and developing one vaccine that will protect against the many varia­tions of the AIDS virus. ISCCalrENiCsE yool ur bather Pet Supplies I Hlllki DIET Available Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infec­tious Diseases, said people in safety stu­dies may have to be observed only for a.; - $5 off Any Service with this Coupon Sexual Healthy sex is good for ~our mental well-being. Play Safe. A Public Service Message from J.O E .. a Private Organ1zat1on MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES may be made Tuesday & Thursday 8-9pm. Friday & Saturday 11 pm- 1;30am. Sunday 6-9pm. THERE ARE RESTRICTIONS. Memberships are limited to reasonably­attract1ve out-of-the-closet liberated adult gay men who are secure with their sexuality We discriminate on the basis that new members must be in reasonable cond1t1on for their body type and (even more important) that they possess a mental attitude that will contribute to the overall atmosphere at J.O E J O.E. meets at the COTTAGE PLAYHOUSE at 611 PACIFIC (look for the Play Sale Flag). - .. This Weekend in Montrose, Not a Minute to Spare APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 recently moved across Westheimerfrom Dirty Sally's. " Soap" by the Staff of t he Montrose Voice Beginning this weekend, daylight sav­ings time begins four weeks earlier than in previous years. In order not to miss one minute of Montrose mania, be ready to set those clocks ahead one h our. o Bar None Sunday, April 12, the Ventu r e -N is having another Uniform Party. If you don't have one or if time has taken its toll on the waistline, try the wonderful selection at Kilroy's- Chutes has postponed its Almost Butch Contest until April 12. So there's still time to get ready. Just register before 1:30 a.m. April 11. Everything from boots to boas are fine for this rau­cus competition. Jerry Reid, formerly of Mary's, is now at the Ripcord where he will be opening at 7:00 a.m. beginning Mon­day, April 6. J ust a reminder, the dead­line for the Prime Choice Contest is May 15 for the May 31 event. The Ranch will celebrate its first anniverary under the ownership of Becky and Betsy later this month. Party info to come. J.D. (on ground), sponsored by Bacchus, and Tony,_ sponsored by the Brazos River Bottom, were some of the representatives from the Texas Gay Rodeo Association participating in the Golden State Gay Ro~eo last . weekend in Los Angeles. The Houston chapter of T.G.R.A. will meet this Sunday, April 5, 2:00 p.m. at The Barn still looking for a wife. Wedding plans Sat. for listening enjoyment. for Ted and Adrian have gone kaput due to the Jack of dowry from either party. D Salute! Alan Fredericks serving it up at The Venture-N o Just Plain Gossip Rumor has it that the owner of Chutes is o Shop 'til You Drop Lobo is introducing a new line of Gazelle swimwear. Remember, it's almost Splash Day time. Besides great food, Hungry Inter ­natio n a l in the Village has "Piano Magic by Carl," 7:00-10:00 p.m. Thurs.- Letters to the Voice From the Readers of the Montrose Voice ~ Thanks for Believing From Lorena McLaughlin, Results Pest Control As everyone knows, the first year in a new business is the most difficu lt. Our appreciation is extended to all the commercial and residential accounts that entrusted their businesses and homes to our service. Thank you for believing in us and offering us the opportunity to succeed. We will continue to offer the community the best possible service available in the pest control industry ~ Guide Drops South Africa From Stan Leehei, publisher "'Key lnterntional"' Listings for the Union of South Africa have been dropped from the 1987 edition of the Key International guide to gay hotels, resorts and guest houses We are concerned not only with the hateful aspects of apartheid, but we omit any establishment anywhere when we learn of racial or religious discrimination. That would be true in Chicago or Cape Town, and we encourage our readers to report any such incidents. There is also the possibility of visitors becoming involved in South Africa's social turmoil, but we assume that anybody trave ling abroad to troubled areas-Nicaragua, Lebanon or Northern Ireland for instance-would famil iarize themselves with the risks they are ru nning. ~ Write the Voice Items in the 'Letters"' column are opinions of readers. Publication of such opinions does not infer a concurring view by the Voice. Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest. Please keep letters brief and mail to "'Letters to the Editor," Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston TX 77006 All letters must be signed and include address and phone number to verify authenticity Address and phone will not be printed. Name will be withheld on request Hats off to all who made the MSA Bil­liards League Garage Sale a huge suc­cess. Even with Sunday rained out, the group netted $500 to help offset expenses for the Houston Invitational Tournament to be held in Mav. A special thanks to The 611, The Ra nch , Rock ' n ' Hor se, E.J's, Bac­chus, Cous ins, Ki ndr ed Spirits, Mary's, Heaven , J.R's and the Min­ing Compa n y . These bars all donated prizes in the "Guess the Number of Beans Con test." Sounds corny, but Carol Gloyna has $160 worth of booze to drink for being closest to the correct total of 6,543. Happy birthday and good luck to Dee who's a year older and a new addition to the staff at Rooster's. Lovett Boule­vard is also saying hello to Big Spot who Open 24 hours ~t..,.,fl9e~ 813 Richmond 522-2365 HUEVOS RANCHEROS reg. 325 now s13s 3am-10am Daily o The Big Event The big event this weekend is the Miss Vacant Lot Festival behind Marys. The true spirit of this event goes very deep. It will be wonderful to see com­munity businesses and individuals come together under the guise of fun to demonstrate the true meaning of Jiving in Montrose. Dickie and Pickles of Mary's, and Rick from the Venture-N, and countless others, have transformed an unsightly, weed-covered vacant lot into a real com­munity play area. Be there Saturday for the fun. o Finally! Talk about Spring cleaning, the oft­burned Buddha is finally gone. Maybe it's a sign that the revitalization of lower Westheimer is really getting serious. Somewhat of a landmark, the Buddha left us earlier this week. So long, big guy. Jerry-all dressed up at the 611 Texas Cable TV Drops MTV BASTROP (UPl}--A cable television company, responding to charges that MTV promotes drug use and devil wor­ship, has pulled the plug on the 24-hour music video channel. Jack Threadgill, owner of Bastrop Cablevision Inc., said March 26 the rock music channel has been replaced with Hit Video USA, which he said is similar to MTV but does not have objectionable film clips. "I don't consider myself a censor of programming," Threadgill said. "I was looking for a service that gave basically the same music service, but without having the most explicit material." Kathy Laake, a secretary for the cable company, said MTV has caused con­cern among parents since it was intro­duced three years ago. Since January, about 50 callers have questioned MTV's content, complain­ing that it promoted drug abuse, sexual promiscuity and devil worship, she said. However, since MTV was taken off the air earlier this month, about 25 peo­ple have called asking that it be rein­stated, Laake said. "They feel they have the right to watch anything they want to," she said. Bastrop, about 30 miles southeast of Austin, gained local notoriety in 1985 when a resident tried to ban a book from the public library. Last year, the city removed a free-form sculpture from a park. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 I HOUSTON ~---~"' PATIO NOW OPEN NEVER A COVER New Special! Customer Appreciation! Take a Break at the Hours of 2pm and Spm Monday-Friday Whatever You are Drinking at That Time Have One On Us! New on Tuesdays! Come Munch and Win A Tab with us at our T.A.B. Tuesday Afternoon Bash Coming Attractions: • Welcome to Houston Party for Cha Cha, Sat., April 11 • Sally's Annual Easter Bonnet Contest, Sunday, April 19 220 Avondale Saturday and Sunday Liquor Bust 4-7pm $5 All the Well You Can Drink Monday Beer Bust $1 6pm-'til 75¢ Schnapps and 50¢ Draft 7 Days a Week Thurs. Jockey Short Contest M. C. The Everpresent Maude $200 in Prizes Showtime 11:00 529-7525 APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Charity Gay Ball Crow-ns EDlperor, EDlpress ITALIAN FURNITURE NEW YORK (UPl)-Two elaborately dressed gay activists were crowned the first Emperor and Empress of the Impe­rial Court of New York during a drag ball for charity at the posh Waldorf Astoria Hotel. Empress I Sybil Bruncheon, a muscle­bound debutante in a white, strapless, designer gown, and Emperor George I, attired as a foreign diplomat, were named the first New York heads of the philanthropic organization. The Imperial Court system was estab­lished more than 20 years ago by gay drag devotees on the West Coast to raise money for gay and non-gay charities, the ball's organizers said. Last Saturday night's $250-a-plate, white-tie fund-raiser drew more than 400 supporters to benefit national AIDS and gay rights groups. Men wearing jewel-encrusted gowns Consumer Groups Hand Out 'No Bell' Awards AUSTIN (UPl)-In honor of April Fools Day, consumer groups presented special awards Wednesday to telephone companies that think consumers can be fooled in to believing they will benefit from telephone service deregulation. Tom Smith of Public Citizen and Carol Barger of Consumers Union said Texas consumers will be the losers under deregulation bills pending before the Legislature. "If passed, these bills will result in higher local and long distance rates for residential consumers and small busi­nesses," Barger said. "The benefits of competition won't find their way to rural Texas. It will be concentrated among high volume, urban customers." Barger said Texas consumers are dis­satisfied with telephone divestiture, and "we're hereto say nobody's going to be fooled again." Barger presented the "Dumb Bell" award to AT&T. "AT&T thinks it can fool the public into believing they will continue to pro­vide the newest in long distance servi­ces at low cost to both rural and urban Texans at equal rates under deregula­tion." She said the 100-year-old telephone company would like the public to believe that it is in a competitive disadvantage with other long distance companies that began after deregulation. A bill pending in the Senate would allow AT&T to reduce or increase its rates without approval by the Public Utility Commission. Smith presented the "Bad Bell" award to Southwestern Bell, which he said is trying to sell the public a bill that will "create urban high tech heavens and leave rural consumers in the tele­communications rustlands." The bill would a llow Bell to offer new, experimental services in cities but not require the services for rural customers. Smith presented the "No Bell" award to MCI, Sprint and other long distance companies that have dropped their opposition to AT&T deregulation. "IF they really believe there will be a share of the market left for them after AT&T deregulation, they deserve a "No Bell" prize," Smith said. "It's an invisi­ble prize because that's how much of a share they will have left." with flowing trains, 17th century cos­tumes, and classic black and punk-style dresses were greeted by cheering crowds at the historic Park Avenue hotel. The newly crowned empress, who by day is actor John Burke, said he has used his drag act for two years to raise funds for AIDS service groups such as New York's Gay Men's Health Crisis. The head of the International Court Conference of the Americas, identified as Empress Nicole, gave an impassi­oned keynote address, calling for accep­tance of less conventional gay people. "It was not our organizers in Washington that started our fight, but our sisters in drag who threw the first rocks at Stonewall," he said, referring to the New York bar where effeminate gay men resisted a raid that was a common form of police harassment in the 1960s. Individual must sell $15,000 worth of high-tech, brand new, contemporary Italian furniture Including • Cry1t1I ind plexlglH• consoles (v.lue lo $2,500) • Lealh•r sot• •nd •rm ch•lr (v.lue of $2,800) • Upholste-red sofH, loveseats, •nd •rm ch•lrt • Bl•ck--lacquered dlnlng-occHlon•I l•bles • Stack-•ble bl.ck laquered wall units • Halogen l•bie lamps • Individual chairs (1ome pairs) Saturday,April4,and Sunday, April 5, Only 10am-4pm each day 2323 South Voss (between w .. sthelmer and San Felipe) STERLING Paint and Body Centen 1107-D Upland Dr. Just N.W. of Katy Frwy & Wllcrest From Minor Dents to Major Restorations Financing Available 932-9401 Some members of the Imperial Court gathered at the coronation of the first emperor and empress Open 24 Hours Phone for Appts. between 9am-6pm \*********************** : Privacy-Security : • • .~ * ~ ~ . :: North Star :: £ Fence Co. ~ !t Free Estimates ! 7 Days a Week • • Cedar-Gates Repaired : ! Wrought Iron-Chain Link t £• • 694-9113 E ! Free Walkgate with this Ad t ***********************' ~•h "' b~~ ~)/os .. ~,~-C/Jc .. wgns o/qffo11slon FLOWERS & GIFTS European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, Fruit a. Gourmet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Stuffed Toys Available. 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted Coffee Shop 1102 Westheimer - 522-3332 Proudly Serving Montrose 24 Hours a Day Steaks, Seafood, Beer, Wine, Champagne Daily Specials Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner MfMllf~Of (¢H:;:;tj). Thanks for Your Continued Support of Aid for AIDS 12 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Koop Says AIDS Researchers Hindered by Lack of Sex Studies for the rest of this century, at the very least." Koop said he was concerned about studies that show blacks and Hispanics are are disproportionately afflicted with the disease because of the high number of intravenous drug users among their By De'A nn Weimer populations. AUSTIN (UPl)-The efforts of scient­ists attempting to unravel the mystery of AIDS have been hampered by a lack of scientific study of sexuality in Amer­ica following the sexual revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said March 26 that AIDS researchers must compare data gathered about AIDS and its transmission with the 1940 results of sexual practices among American adults as identified in the Kinsey report. Koop spoke to a joint session of the Texas Legislature and requested increased state support for research pro­jects on AIDS. "We're taking AIDS understanding of 1986 and sexual behavior of 1940 and projecting it, and you and I know there was a thing called the sexual revolution between those two dates," he said. For that reason, Koops said he believes the number of people infected with AIDS virus is "under reported." "We've done the best that we can with the information available to us, but if you think back about what you've seen published about the sexual behavior of men and women in this country, there's really only one thing in any large volume, and that's the Kinsey Report in 1940," he said. Koop said he "would love to see some way of anonymously testing a large group of people" for the AIDS virus to give physicians and scientists a clear picture of how many people are infected. "We desperately need as much infor­mation as we can get if we are to project what is going to happen in this country five years from now, 10 years from now," he said. And Koop said the change in atti­tudes about sex and the AIDS epidemic makes it essential for children to become educated about the disease. "If we're going to educate them about AIDS, we certainly have to let them know something about their own sexu­ality," he said. "We have a responsibil­ity to pass this information on to our children. I personally prefer that this be done by parents in the homnes of Amer­ica." But Koop said school systems must develop human sexuality education pro­grams that go beyond existing sex edu­cation programs that students have dubbed "organ recitals." The surgeon general said there are only three weapons that can slow the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome-abstinence, monogamous relationships and condoms. Meanwhile Koop warned that by 1991 the cost of caring for AIDS victims will be twice the federal government's cur­rent budget for all of its public health programs. "The costs of this disease to our society are already high and they are on their way to becoming astronomical," he said. "The present costs of research and patient care are already running into the hundreds of millions of dollars, and before the decade passes they will be in the tens of billions of dollars." Koop reminded legislators that two­thirds of the Texans stricken with A IDS since 1981 have died and that 250,000 people will die of the illness by 1991. "Projections for the future are alarm­ing," he said. "It will be a nine-fold increase." Estimating that AIDS will cost the nation $70 billion in 1991, Koop c11lled on legislators to come up with creative ways to fund care for AIDS victims that would not bankrupt government and private insurance companies. for Immunological Disorders in Hous­ton announced Wednesday that it hopes to begin testing a vaccine for the disease in humans. Twelve percent of the nation's popula­tion is black, but 22 percent of AIDS patients are black. And Hispanics make up 14 percent of AIDS patients, although only 6 percent of the nation's population is Hispanic. Hospitals and scientists in Texas and California are leading the nation in research to develop drugs that are effec­tive against the disease. The Institute "Like the rest of us you have only begun what appears to be a long and fearful journey," said Koop. "All signs point to this disease being a burden to us We're Houston's largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice. We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose V01ce. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewhere around $6,000,000 weC"kly on the things we buy-clothes, partying at night, apartments, cars and repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. (Yes that's $6 million weekly.) ' Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask-by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 for ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY. ~~~~8~o;;:i,~,'~~~;~utsh:e~~~';5 A~=~~:st_r~b.~~o~n 1~-~ 1~~~~~s ;~dafhu';~,1~:;: ;~~~e~s:~:~g~o;.,;,;~~~.~ ~~l!~w~e'~:.!:'~~~!~111~;1~ a5s:~~e ~~.~;e~9..:e';~~9 us spenas ~iflJ~g_~if~r~ls~1"N tg,~~t~Ei>tf:S~~ f~~~tEJ' ~lJfL~~~rg:~~'f:!~l~:(;f~ ~;g,~so APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 14 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice The time has come again for our quar­terly calendar of the highlights that you can expect from our city's cultural com­munity: Houston Springs Forth o April Ghosts (UH-Downtown, 3)-Ibsen's play from the time when people were first coming to grips with syphilis. No Evidence of a Struggle (Heinen, 3 & 4)-contemporary dance with the Far­rell Dyde Dance Theater Post West Bernard: A Republic of Texas Ordnance Depot 1937-39, Whar­ton County (Link-Lee Carriage House, 3812 Montrose, 3)-a UST archelogical exhibit. Second Annual Mail Art Show (Mis­souri Street Gallery, 3) Several Dancer's Core (Houston Com­munity College, 3) Spring Vocal Art Concert (HSPV A, 3) Potpourri Concert (HSPV A, 4)-early music ensemble, classical guitarists, harpists. ONO! John Williams (Jones, 4)-the com­poser conducts the HSO in two of his classical works and suites from three of his movies. Chamber Music Unlimited (Zoo, 5, 2:30)-Freebies. ONO! Joel Sternfeld: American Prospects (MFA,5) Joel Sternfeld, photographer (MF A, 5, 4:00 p.m.)-a lecture by the artist him­self. Freebies. ONO! Cimarron Wind Quintet (Heinen, 5)­with guest harpsicordist Emmanuel Ax, pianist and Yo-Yo Ma, cellist (Jones, 7)-0NO! Social Security (Music Hall, 7)­touring two person comedy with Lucie Arnez and Laurence Luckinbill Feld Ballet (Jones 8&9) Milt Larkin and the All-Stars (Jones Plaza, 9, noon)-jazz. Freebies. ONO! Dangerous Corner (Chocolate Bayou, 9)-psychological mystery where the absolute truth might be absolutely dan­gerous. Godspell (AD Players, 9) Boaz Heilman, pianist (Heinen, 9)­three Beethoven sonatas. ONO! Love in the Art ofLautrec (MFA, 9)­lecture by Sir Lawrence Gowing. Free­bies. ONO! 1987 Studio Exhibition (Glassel! School, 9)-Freebies. Peter Max, John Olen (Dubose-Rein Galleries, 9) Lucie Arnaz and Laurence Luckinbill co-star in the new comedy "Social Security," coming to the Music Hall April 7 piece Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Elliott Carter has written in over a decade. Feiffer's People (Company Onstage, 10) Tibet: The Mystic Mountain Sanctu­ary (Museum of Natural Science, 10)­lecture by Harold A. Knutson Alan "Gunga" Purves, drummer, and Ernst Riejseger, cellist (Diverse Works, 10)-0NO! Wind/ Percussion Ensemble (HSPVA, 10)-0NO! Ladies Against Women (Maceba, 11)-Plutonium Players. ONO! 6lst Annual Junior School Exhibit (Glassell, 11) World of Beauty (Stages, 11) Duan Michals, photographer (Glas­sell, 12)-illustrated lecture about his own works. ONO! Palm Sunday Concert (St. John the Devine, Westheimer & River Oaks, 12, 4:00 p.m.)-Freebies. ONO! James Merrill, poet (UH, 14) Gary Retherford (UH-Downtown O'Kane Gallery, 16) Crimes of the Heart (Theater Subur- Emmanuel Ax (right) and Yo-Yo Ma perform at Jones Hall April 7 Uncommon Women and Others (Main Street, 9) A Celebration of Some 100 to 150 Notes (Jones, 10)-HSO presents the world premiere of the first orchestral bia, 17) One Enchanted Evening (Music Hall, 17)-Newton Wayland conducts the Pops in Richard Rogers music. Jacqueline Simone (UST Bookstore, 221-reading from her short fiction. Fine Arts Mixer (MFA, 23, 5:30)­Freebies. Cash bar. ONO! The Marriage of Figaro (Heinen, 23- 25) Norma (Jones, 23)-HGO presents Ghena Dimitrova. The Deborah Hay Dance Company (Diverse Works, 24 & 25) Dame Joan Sutherland and Luciano Pavarotti (Summit, 25)-0NO! HCC Reportory Dance Co. (Theater One, 4.30 & 5/1) o May Indoor· Outdoor (Lawndale, 1)-large scale sculpture by local artists. Piano Concert (HSPVA, 1)-0NO! Starship Houston (Museum of Natu­ral Science, 1)-a 21st century adven­ture through space and time Sylvia Marcovici (Jones 2, 2)-HSO Pinocchio (Company Onstage, 2) Bach Vespers (Christ the King Luthe-ran, 3)-0NO! Hispanic Art in the U.S.: 30 Contem- In Space: A Photographic Journey (Houston Center for Photography, 12)­Houston's first large-scale exhibit of outer space photos, believe it or not! Spalding Gray (Alley, 12)­storyteller/ performance artist Open House (Bayou Bend, 14)­Freebies. Preston Jones New Play Symposium (Chocolate Bayou, 14) Montrose Symphonic Band (Rice, Hammon Hall, 15)-benefit for Aid for AIDS and the AIDS Foundation. ONO! Glassell School Benefit and Art Auc­tion (Glassel!, 15)-0NO! Drawings by Holbein from the Collec­tion of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle (MFA, 16) HSO, many soloists and the Houston Symphony Chorale (Jones, 16) Don't Drink the Water (First Unitar­ian, Channing Hall, 15)-by Woody Allen Drawings by Holbein from Windsor (MFA, 17)-lecture, Freebies. ONO! The New Farrell Dyde Dance Theater brings contemporary dance to Hemen Theater this weekend, April 3 and 4 porary Painters and Sculptors (MFA, 3) Suburban Cowgirl and Teams of Idi­ocy (Houston House, 4)-The Panda Monium Players present the world pre­miere of a psychological comedy by Houstonian Christopher Woods. A Love Song for Miss Lydia (The Ensemble, 7)-comedy about love among the aging. Annual Pops Concert (HSPVA, 7&8) Hispanic Music Festival (MFA, 7, then every Thursday)-Freebies The Dark Bob (Diverse Works, 8)- Performance art. ONO' Cimmaron Wind Quintet (Heinen, 10) Andre Watts, pianist(Jones, 8)-HSO Chamber Music Concert (HSPVA, 12>-0NO! Evita (Music Hall, 12)-TUTS Music of America (First Presbytenan, 18)-Concert Chorale of Houston. ONO! HSPV A Symphony Orchestra (HSPV A, 19)-0NO! Byron: Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know (Alley, 19)-Dcrek Jacobi Brown and Hadlock (DuBose-Rein Galleries, 21) Spring Showcase of Short Plays (HSPVA, 21-24) Irwin, Pisarski, Scott (Diverse Works, 22 & 23) Delia Stewart's Junior Company (Heinen, 2:3)-tentative Marry Me a Little and Blue Window (Stages, 23)-a Sondheim revue and a one-act With a Bow to Ballet (Music Hall, 23, 10::30 a.m.)-Shimada conducts the APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 W"ith Cultural Excitenient is this weekend at the Albert Thomas Convention Center. HSO. ONO! They're Playing Our Song (UH, 24) The Birthday Party (Actors Work­shop, 24)-by Pinter Delia Stewart Dance Company (Tower 24 & 25) Houston Hispanic: New Talents, New Paths (Glassell, 28)-juried show Serenade, Dark Elegies and Etudes (Jones, 28)-Houston Ballet Hispanic Art Family Day (MFA, 30) o June Cats (Jones, 2-7) The Common Pursuit (Alley, 19)­directed by the playwright, Simon Gray Mother Goose (Stages, 4)-for child­ren Dames at Sea (Comedy Onstage, 5) Carmine Street (Theatre Southwest, 12)-See above Follies (Wortham Theater Center, 16)-Theater Under the Stars first show in the brand new Wortham! There will be a new park, named Our Park, at 2604 Alabama. It's being dedi­cated at noon tomorrow. Teipei has chosen 25 high school artists to send here in our Sister Cities Cultural Exchange. Houstonian Brian K. Busch won the Theater Southwest full-length comedy competition. His play, Carmine Street, will be performed there, opening May 12. Alex Finlayson's World of Beauty has been chosen as the world premiere pro­duction for Stages' Texas Playwrights Festival. Singing auditions at Astroworld are tomorrow, April 4. 794-3232 ext. 535. If you're interested in joining the Montrose Symphonic Band (or donat­ing instruments), call Andy Mills at527- 9454. The Alley has announced its audi­tions: Equity membership candidates on April 24, Equity members on May 6 and non-Equity actors on May 13. If interested, send photo and resume to the Heartbreak House (Chocolate Bayou, Alley and apply for an appointment. 25)-by Shaw The Feld Ballet comes to Jones Hall April 8 and 9 o Celebrate! Curt Alfrey (top), Sheryl Croix and Nanette Wilson, portraying members of the "Tribe" in the musical "Hair," now playing at Stages' The Quest for Eternity: Chinese Ceramic Sculpture from the People's Republic of China (MFA, 28) o Notes Several Dancers Core, which is based both in Houston and Atlanta, is per­forming here this weekend. Their dan­ces include a satire, a live guitar accompaniment and even a dance incor­porating trapeze artistry. The perfor­mance tonight includes a reception beginning at 7:00 before the show. Tickets are $25 for this opening, which beneifts the Houston Foundation for Immunological Disroders. Seating is limited, so call 874-4310 for reserva­tions. The Friends of Vlado Perlemuter are extremely excited this week. Vlado, the internationally known French pianist whose Romantic style has been called "a luminous touch," will give concerts at the Heinen Theater next Friday and Saturday. Mr. Perlemuter has not given a con­cert in America for quite a few years Al's Insurance Service 4108 Fannin Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 529-0140 AUTO LIABILITY SR-22 FILINGS YOUNG DRIVERS LOW DOWN PAYMENTS LIFE COMMERCIAL AUTO BONDS PROPERTY HOMEOWNERS NOTARY SERVICE now. He was in Texas only two years ago or so judging the Van Cliburn con­test. In all candor, this might be your last chance to hear him live. He is 82 years old. He played one of the first public per­formances of the complete piano works of Ravel in 1929. The composer himself attended. Next week's performances feature Ravel's music, as well as Chopin, Debussy and Faure. The pro­gram will be different each night. The Friends of the Library book sale April 7, 1940-The Booker T. Washing­ton stamp is issued. It's the first one to honor a black American. B'days: 3-Doris Day, Marsha Mason, Eddie Murphy. 4-Giorgio Bas­sani, Anthony Perkins, John Cameron Swayze. 5-Bette Davis, Frank Gor­shin, Arthur Hailey. 6-Susan Miller, Butch Cassidy, Merle Haggard. 7- Francis Ford Coppola, David Frost, Ravi Shankar. 8-C. Maurice Bowra, E.Y. Harburg, Sonja Henie. 9-Hugh Hefner, Michael Learned, Brandon de Wilde. Houston Symphony Orchestra Serglu Comlsslona. Music Director presents John Williams & The Houston symph~ny: A Classic :·:.:. ''~·. J Encoun~~-! ..... ·~·-·,.;;~ !.?:;' tjJ'1tfJ4~'.li;J,;f ~~~~~~~·.=!::"' ;if1t~::~April 4• 5•6 ~~~d:h~ ~a~~~r~~~~; Special guest. Burgess Meredith. narrates ··An Old Man Remembers"' from the Oscar­nom1nated music by Williams for the 1%9mov~of Wilham Faulkner's comic novel. The Retvers compositions: • Classical works: Violin Concerto, featuring Alexander Treger, and Essay for Strings. • Plus some of his greatest music for the movies. Saturday, April 4, 8:00 p.m. Sunday, April 5, 2:30 p.m. Monday, April 6, 8:00 p.m. Jones Hall For tickets call 227-ARTS 16 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 er the dof Monlrose! The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 ·-':~-­~-' ·----=·-----­':.~\.____. __ \ APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Life in the Fast Lane The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe I've been listening to Congress debate whether to raise the speed limit from 55 to 65. After carefully weighing the argu­ments, analyzing the consequences and deliberating the philosophical ques­tions involved, I've taken an irrevocable stand on this all-important issue. First, let's take a look at what's in­volved : S enator Steven Symms, chief sponsor of the 65 mph bill, said that the 55 mph lim­it cost one billion ad­ditional hours of passenger time each year. On the other hand, the National Safety Council, speaking in opposition, said the lower limit saved 3,000 lives a year. That comes out to 333,333 hours sit­ting in a car to save one life. This is a long time. Now let's say that the person whose life is saved has perhaps 43 years or so left to live. That's about 333,333 hours. So we see that for every extra hour we sit in a car we extend our lives an extra hour. That sounds like a pretty good deal, but not everyone agrees. Says Millicent M., "I'd rather be peacefully pushing up daisies than be jammed between two thundering semis on a fume-chocked freeway." I explained to her that was exactly the choice, but she stuck to her guns. The problem here is tha most Ameri­cans have not made the necessary effort to properly utilize those extra hours they've been spending in their cars. This could be qua lity time. Why not embark on a serious flirtation with the person in the window of the bus in front of you? Or you could turn on your cassette player and listen to Books on Tape or learn enough Chinese to say, "No, no! This is one-way the other way!" But after a hard day at the office, most people lack the energy to do more than steer, push the pedals, honk the horn and curse. Thus we must turn our atten­tion to what Americans will do with the extra hours they'll save at 65 mph. Fortunately, most Americans who drove at 55 mph when the patriotic limit was imposed to save oil in 1974 are already driving 65, so we have their well of experience to draw on. For example, Dr. Huntley L., an amateur veterinar­ian, arrived home an hour early on May 24, 1981, and discovered a cure for coreopsis. Dr. L. is, however, the exception. More typical is Heironymous B., a piano mover. When he was driving 55, Mr. B. would arrive home at 7:00 p.m., and have a drink before dinner while watch­ing Wheel of Fortune with his wife, Mary, who had intellectual pretensions. She didn't mind, though, because she had already watched the MacNeil­Lehrer Report at 6:00. But when Mr. B. sped up to 65 mph he arrived home at 6:00 and wanted to watch Magnum P.I. while having three drinks before dinner. So they had an extra hour to tell each other that (1) she was not a fun person, (2) he was a mush­brain, (3) she was a common nag, and (4) he drank too much. Needless to say, after less than 20 extra hours of marital togetherness over a period of only a month, Mrs. B. packed up and went home to her mother, who not only loved the McNeil-Lehrer Report but Wall Street Week in Review. As for Mr. B., he became a querulous drunk and is today without family, friends or a job- all because he drove 65 mph. True, there are a few arguments in favor of the 65 mph limit, all of them specious. Swaggo G., a 16-year-old drop­out, got home an hour earlier from the Senior Prom by driving 65, and, as his father, Mr. G., says, "Anything that gets that kid off the streets sooner will improve traffic safety." But there's nothing inherently safer about arriving home an hour earlier. Branghilda M. did just that by driving 65. She was thus in time to answer the door when a secular humanist evange­list called. Converted by his literature, she is now selling her favors in a Pago Pago dance hall. So by every rational argument, it behooves us all to drive no faster than 55, enriching our lives with those extra hours that sane conduct will provide. I am, however, vehemently in favor of raising the speed limit to 65. I have a very good reason for this. I want to drive 70 again. 1987 (S F.) Chronicle Publishing Co. ~ ~ It's Springtime again and time to do those projects you've been putting off. !. Call .I I ,, HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor • Roofing (All Types) • Tree & Trash Remoua/ • Remodeling • Insulation • Sheetrock/ Painting • Tile/ Masonry • Plumbing/ B ectrical • Cabinets • Foundations Repaired • Decks/ Hot Tubs No Job Too B;g or Too Small 520-9064 Or Emergency Pager 891-4053 Fortunes Taurus and Mate Should Now Work Together By Mark Orlon Your Horoscope from the Voice For Fflday evening. April 3, through Friday morning. Apnl 9. 1987 ARIES-You'll meet someone soon who seems to be a soul mate but let time and understanding take their course before you make this person a larger part of your life. The danger of illusion is all around, but at least it provides relief from all the work you've got to do. TAURUS-You and your lover or close one may play together well, but this time it's an opportunity to work together, also. The dreamer of you two could inspire the more practical one in the process, and find stimulation in concrete plans. It does both of you a lot of good. GEMINI-A good time for getting mar­ried. Well, if not in the legal sense, it's still the time to make that firm and strong committment, if you believe that this is it, this is the one. Heart and head are united. CANCER- A short jaunt, a quick trip, something that allows you time off from the everyday world is in the picture this time. Could be you don't even plan it. Could be some mystery and suspense involved. Sounds like a good way to set off into spring. LEO-Finishing with one thing means it's time to start another. A bright idea may come your way, so keep your mind open and seize the moment when it comes. Your lover or close one may talk you out of it, but stick to your guns. Get started. VIRGO-Don't be so nasty. All your nervous energy could be used for some­thing better than a personal attack. It's going to be a long, hot, spring and summer, and you're feeling edgy already? Pay some attention to what relaxes you. Cool it down, hot stuff! LIBRA-Too much talk and too little action could keep you from holding on to that vision of ecstacy you had last time. Stop yakking1 Some things are better enjoyed in silence Autie Mame said life is a banquet; it's a concert, too, and most people are too damned dumb to shut up and listen SCORPIO- The indecisiveness that was driving you crazy is now over, but the decision that you've made brings changes in your life that were totally unexpected. Don't let that discourage you. Don't get lost in the haze again. Take one day at a time. SAGITTARIUS-Relationships work on so many different levels. You and your lover could discover even deeper under­standing of one another just by staying close and offering some extra support. CAPRICORN- That love affair that got you going last time should be the focus of your life right now. It's allowing you to appreciate and see yourself in a new and better way. You like what you're seeing in the mirror, and so does your lover. AQUARIUS- What happened to the­upfront, direct approach that Aquarious is so well known for? Your personal con­fusion has you hiding behind a mask; and those close to you aren't fooled by it for an instant. Open up, and let them help. PISCES- Who do you think you are, a Gemini? Taking things apart to analyze them is good and necessary in many situations, but know when to stop and smell the roses. Your brain's working overtime at the expense of your heart. So relax 19' 7 MONTf'OSE VOICE 18 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Drug Abuse, fEIFFER® Medical Costs Top America's Problem List NEW YORK !UPl)-Drug abuse, the rising cost of medical care and the fed­eral budget deficit are America's three most serious social and economic prob­lems, according to a Conference Board survey of 5,000 families. In contrast, the threat of nuclear war and pornography were considered by those polled to be the least serious, said the report, released Wednesday. The survey, which included 18 differ­ent problem areas, was conducted for the business research group by National Family Opinion, Inc., of Toledo, Ohio. People in virtually all age and income groups were most concerned about drug abuse, medical costs and the federal deficit. The survey also suggested that the public's major concerns were not always the same as those expressed by public officials, a board spokesman said. Following the top three issues were unemployment, crime and job losses in manufacturing. Those surveyed were also concerned about alcoholism, the plight of American farmers, AIDS, pov­erty, the foreign trade deficit and the homeless, in that order. Rounding out the list of worries were pollution, the cost of housing, white­collar crime and smoking. Last on the list were pornography and the threat of nuclear war, the survey showed. The survey underscored both major differences and similarities among this country's different age and income groups, the board said. Some key find­ings included: -The rising cost of medical care topped the lists of worries for Ameri­cans over 55, and also ranked as the leading concern of younger people. -Concern about the federal deficit rose sharply with age and income. It was the No. 1 worry among those earn­ing $50,000 and up. -Unemployment was a critical worry of people under 45 but diminished as a major concern among older age groups. In terms of geography, unem­ployment was the major concern of peo­ple living in the nation's oil-dominated areas but was only a minor concern of those living in New England. -Families in the farm-dominated North Central states showed more con­cern for the plight of the American farmers than the rest of the nation. But even in those agricultural states, the deficit was considered a more serious problem. !< 10 SEATING PLENTY PARKING PATIO SEATING PLENTY PARKING PATIO SEATING ;!! ~ $~ "UNGR)' 2 for 1 MEAL ~ ~ £, ~· Buy one or our main items at ~ a: tl - : regular price and get the )> ~ c:,-.:.J.. -.. • • ~ second item of equal or less ~ > 'r · ··-- CJ• value free. Dine·in only. z !z • IUI V'tHl • P_resent coupon when ordering. C> ~ INTERNATIONAL CUISINE SAVE UPTO $7.95 e,, •Gyros •Pasta •Grilled Chicken Breast EXPIRES MA y 1 1987 z •Chicken Fried Steak • Hoagie and Pita • ~ • Sandwiches • Salads • Soups • Burgers 0 "" ...... 0 ,.. 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Alcoholism is a disease. This film knows that. At one point, Nadia, played by Kim Basinger, explains that her drinking problem has something to do with an allergy. Most of the humor in the show comes from the way that champagne affects the lady. Therefore, the audience is put into the position of making fun of a sick person for being sick. Walter (Bruce Willis) has gotten him­self into a bind. His boss is having an important dinner party. Walter's date bowed out at the last minute. He must have one. His boss thinks of him as too studious and not flashy enough as it is. None of his other female friends are available on such short notice. So he allows his brother, a shady car sales­man, to set him up with a blind date. Bruce Willis? Bruce Willis can't find a date? I know that sounds like miscast­ing, but it's very believable in context. However, though this character has the arch humor that his character in "Moonlighting" does, it has next to none of the quick-witted inventiveness. In fact, in this movie Willis becomes the "straight man" off whom a small collec­tion of zanies bounce their jokes. In con­cept, and occasionally in execution, this role might remind some of a younger George Bums, but Willis has none of Burns' depth, hence little of his underly­ing warmth. I know many are awaiting Waiting for the Moon, which features and Llnda Hunt and Llnda Bassett as Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas. I am assured that it will be shown at least once during the Houston International Film Festi­val, April 17-26. Then it will probably open for a regular run at the Greenway III on May 1. o Openings Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol Man Facing Southeast (Belair}-A different mystery from Argentina, is the man an alien or simply crazy? A Shot in the Dark; The Wrong Box (Rice Media Center, 3)-the second Clouseau film and one of the best dark farces ever made. ONO! La Terrazza (MFA, 3)-The Terrace. ONO! The Go-Between; Lola Montes (Rice MC,4)-0NO! Amore Mio Aiutami (MFA, 4)- Help Me, My Love! ONO! II La Conoscevo Bene (MFA, 5)-1 Know Her Well. ONO! Monty Pytho's The Meaning of Life (Rice MC, 5)-0NO! Der Prozess (Rice MC, 6)-The Trial. War crimes trial of concentration camp guards. ONO! Panel Discussion about Der Prozess (Goethe Institute, 7)-Freebies. ONO! Swimming to Cambodia (Belair, 8)­benefit for Alley Theatre Back to the plot, a lthough the dinner is to introduce staff members to an important client, it is not held in a gra­cious home, nor even in a small banquet room. Everyone is seated at separate lit­tle tables in a French restaurant. It looks like they intend to pretend to bump into each other. Is that believa­ble? I'm not sure. Dauid Bedford (John Larroquette), Nadia's insanely jealous ex-boyfriend, wages a war of extermination against Walter Comedian Harmonists (Goethe Insti­tute, 9)-documentary about a late 1920's Berlin carbaret act similar to the King's Singers. Freebies. ONO! The Pawnshop; The Rink; The Kid (Rice MC, 9)-Charlie Chaplin! ONO! Walter's brother has told him that when Nadia drinks she loses control and becomes a wild woman. Interpret­ing that sexually, Walter makes sure she arrives at the party soused. In an innocent, unihibited way, Nadia com­pletely trashes the evening. Basinger is very, very funny in this role. Later, to get even, Walter trashes a party SO!llC of Nadia's friends are hav­ing. As he does so, he is guilty, vulgar and offensive. Not funny. Meanwhile, they have attracted the attention of Nadia's super-jealous ex­boyfriend. David (John Larroquette) will stop at nothing to get Nadia back and to protect her from other suitors. This is pure slapstick, character­comedy at its best. Later, Nadia becomes engaged to David to save Walter's hide. The ques­tion becomes "Can Walter win Nadia away from David and marry her him­self?" That leads to a night of preambula­tions which reminded me of Victor! Vic­toria (by the same director) and a wedding scene that reminded my com­panion of The Graduate. One of this movie's problems is that it keeps reminding us of movies that are much better than it is itself. Walter's (Bruce WiUis) hoP_es for promotio.n explode like champgane bubbles when he brings his blind date (Kim Basinger) to an important client dinner with his boss {George Coe) Mahoney {Steue .Guttenberg, left) and Harris (G. W. Baile\', right) go at each other in "mouth-to-mouth" combat as Jones {Michael Winslou·) looks on in "Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol" It is definitely one of the minor works in the ouvre of director Black Edwards. Still, Edwards was the director of the "Pink Panther" series. He hasn't com­pletely lost his touch for inventive funny business. Blind Date is not a horrible movie. On the contrary, it's very entertaining. It has a few good belly-laughs in it. But I cannot wholeheartedly recommend that you pay full price for it. o Notes My informant was in error last week. The ticket price for the Alley benefit at Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice 20 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Reagan Speaks on AIDS-Finally ing in the military. "For the president to take credit for this is like going in front of the Ameri­can Heart Association and claiming credit for paying hospitalization costs for coronary heart disease," Dunne said. By Norman D. Sandler PHILADELPHIA (UPl)- President Reagan called Wednesday for a con­certed AIDS education program, but only with a strong dose of moral instruc­tion to discourage sexual activity among young people and recognize that "prevention is better than cure." Branding the disease "public health enemy No. l" in a speech to a medical group, Reagan punctuated his most sub­stantive statement yet on AIDS with a call for schools to discourage sexual freedom blamed by many for its spread. "Let's be honest with ourselves," he said. "AIDS information cannot be what some call 'value neutral.' After all, when it comes to preventing AIDS, don't medicine and morality teach the same lessons." Reagan, in remarks to the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, described the AIDS epidemic, which has killed about 19,000 Americans, as "the most obvious and disturbing exception" to recent strides that show "the pulse of American medicine is strong." However, he hailed "unprecedented progress" since the virus was disco­vered just years ago and said the government is doing everything possi­ble to battle AIDS. As an example, he lauded the Food and Drug Admini3tration's expedited approval two weeks ago of the drug AZT as an effective-if expensive and, for some victims, inaccessible-treatment for symptoms of the disease. "The limit on AIDS research today is not money or will," he said, "but the physical limits ofresearch facilities and the number of people trained in the necessary techniques." •MONTROSE KROGER STORE OPEN 24 HOURS "But all the vaccines and medications in the world won't change one basic truth: that prevention is better than cure," he said, "and that's particularly true of AIDS, for which right now there is no cure. This is where education comes in." On the question of education and prevention, Reagan walked a tightrope that reflected a clash of views within his administration on how to promote greater awareness of AIDS and steps to prevent its spread. Reagan appeared to embrace the course championed by Education Secre­tary William Bennett and other conser­vative activists in charting a limited role for the federal government and sidestepping questions raised by Sur­geon General Everett Koop's crusade for condom use and other "safe sex" techniques. "The federal role must be to give edu­cators accurate information about the disease," Reagan said. "How that infor­mation is used must be up to schools and parents." Koop has surprised some onetime crit­ics and angered some former loyalists on the political right by waging an aggressive crusade for better education and "safe sex" prevention. His out­spokeness has run into a wall of opposi­tion from Bennett and other leaders of the conservative movement, which fears public alarm over AIDS-shown by polls to be second only to cancer as a dominant health concern-will lead to more sex education and encourage greater promiscuity. A recent AIDS education initiative issued by the Department of Health and Human Services was toned down under •4 EXPRESS LANES DAILY pressure from conservatives to emphas­ize abstinence and monogamous rela­tionships for avoiding AIDS. By concentrating on those options, how­ever, the report flew in the face of a warning by Koop that a prevention pro­gram rooted in abstinence "is totally unrealistic." Reagan, prodded by Congress, has consented to sharp increases in federal support for AIDS research in the last few years. The Department of Health and Human Services has requested $534 million for AIDS-related functions in its 1988 budget request, a 28.5 percent increase over the 1987 appropriation of $415.6 million. Some critics from both parties in Con­gress have criticized even this appropri­ation as too low. In a report last October, scientists convened by the National Academy of Sciences recommended the government spend $1 billion annually on AIDS education and $1 billion a year on research by 1990. The panel of scientists also recom­mended the White House take a leader­ship role in the fight against AIDS, as it has in the battle against illegal drug use. Until recently, the president has lar­gely stayed away from the issue. Gay Men's Health Crisis, a non-profit education and support organization in New York, said "no one could be more pleased" that Reagan "has finally spoken on the issue of AIDS." However, executive director Richard Dunne said that of the $1.75 billion ear­marked for AIDS in fiscal 1987 and 1988, $700 million covers mandated Medicare and Medicaid costs and test- Never comfortable with the issues raised by a disease whose chief victims have been homosexual men and drug addicts, Reagan has commented on AIDS only on rare occasions in the last few years, usually framing his com­ments in terms of the federal commit­ment. Thai Prisoners Undergo AIDS Testing BANGKOK, Thailand (UPI)- Prison inmates are undergoing tests for AIDS, and initial blood samples indicate no signs of the virus in the prisoners, health officials said Thursday. Analysis of 153 blood samples showed no sign of the AIDS virus, and another 520 samples must be examined, a Health Ministry official said. Among those tested were 44 foreigners. There are 186 foreigners in prisons in Bang­kok, including 42 Americans. Health officials say six confirmed cases of AIDS-including three Ameri­cans have been discovered in Thailand since late 1984. Acquired immune deficiency syn­drome breaks down the body's immune system, making its victim suseptible to other diseases. High risk groups include homosexuals and drug addicts. A U.S. Embassy spokesman said the tests would become part of routine health care for Thai and foreign inmates in the prisons. Sail into Kroger ... for Fresh Lenten Specials KROGER SEAFOOD SHOPPE Where else but Kroger can you find such a catch? Honestly fresh/ Some of it flown in from the Gulf, Atlantic, Pacific and the Great Lakes. It's all mouth watering & delicious. Stop by and see what's biting today! APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 AKE THE RIGHT ECTION • • on Houston's outrageous New conference call our exciting phone service has become the rage In california, Phlladelphla, Washington, D.C. and Baltlmore, Now we have made It available to gay men right here In Texas! we are the first and biggest company In the fleld-our conferences are HOT!! When you dial you Will be connected to an ongoing, UNINHIBITED CONFERENCE CALL, with up to nine men from all over Houston. NOT PROFESSIONALS! Just nine Interesting men, like yourself, anxious to make new acquain­tances. LIVE! NOT A RECORDING. Top or bottom, short or tall, young or old, they're all here! It's only $2 *-cheap by any standards, and billed discreetly to your phone bill. No credit cards are required. Your anonymity Is guaranteed. call 713-976-9696 now and see what you have been missing. • HOUSt~~: 713·976·9696 *This call is only $2 in most of the 713 area codes. Matching is random and you may not hear another caller ar.ld yet still be charged. call at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi­tional toll charges may apply in some areas. 22 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Group Seeks Accurate Portrayals of Honiosexuals By Catherine Gewertz LOS ANGELES (UPl)- Chris Uszler and his band of beneficent spie$ are out to change the world and they have started by infiltrating Hollywood. The Mission accepted by Uszler and his organization, the Alliance for Gay and Lesbian Artists, is deceptively sim­ple: change the world's perception of homosexuals by making certain they are represented realistically in movies, television and theater. "Prejudice and hatred comes from unfamiliarity and uncertainty," said Uszler, AGLA's executive director. "The more people know, the less likely they are to act in a bigoted or prejudiced manner when in their lives they meet someone gay or lesbian." One of the methods the 8-year-old organization employs in its makeover of the gay media image is to reward posi­tive portrayals with its annual media awards, held this year in March. AGL.A's Media Watch Committee monitors and reacts to the images of gays and lesbians projected in film and television and intervenes in gay-related issues concerning working actors in Hollywood. After Rock Hudson died of complica­tions from AIDS in October 1985, Media Watch publicly attacked news media reports that AIDS hysteria was sweep­ing Hollywood. In t~e wake of Hudson's death, the committee worked to educate actors and directors concerned about open­mouthed kissing scenes, telling them that medical experts did not believe kissing put them at high risk for the deadly virus. But one of AGL.A's most important missions is in the hands of sleuths AGLA members working in dozens of Hollywood niches, from secretaries to big-name producers, Uszler said. While on the job, they keep an eye out for signs that gays are being badly por­trayed in upcoming projects and then pass the word to AGL.A's Clearinghouse Committee. Sometimes tips come in the night, anonymously and unsolicited. "Someone will mail us a script or leave a message on the phone machine that this thing is going on, or this story is being drafted and we should know about it," Uszler said. "Sometimes they leave us names so we know who to approach." And approach they do. Clearinghouse Committee members meet with screenwriters, producers, network pro­~ ammers whoever is shaping a pro­iect, to try to have some impact on the final result, Uszler said. gays and lesbians are; that we're not a threat to them or to this society," Uszler said. "Because the AIDS crisis has inflamed homophobia, what goes out now is more important than ever in terms of telling the truth about the gay and lesbian community." For Uszler, the issue is not just an abstract cause, a social challenge to be met. It is a personal mission with sting­ing memories attached. He recalls how he felt as a 15-year-old in Milwaukee in 1968, keeping the secret that he was gay and watching a seg­ment of the police series, "N.Y.P.D.", one of the first shows to portray gays on episodic television. "There was a lot of negativity in it," Uszler said. "The whole message was that gays' lives are not worth living. I remember how awful I felt and how deeply it impacted me. That fuels my involvement with AGLA. "Young people are struggling with their sexuality and the media can reach them and teach them to have pride in themselves." Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose Miss Vacant Lot Finals Saturday, April 4 Booths! Games! Prizes! Vacancies! Lot Opens-1pm Final Judging-9:30pm BETTER LAWilS & qARDEilS Total lawn maintenance Commercial~ Residential • Lclndscclpe · • Trclsh Removcll • Chimne4 Sweep • Tree Se rvice • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN An example of AGL.A's success in such discussions is "The Cartier Affair," a recent made-for-TV movie starring Joan Collins and David Has­selhoff. Tipped to the script by an actor who read for the role and was offended by what he felt was anti-gay humor, AGLA met with NBC officials and the script was revised, Uszler said. Sooner or later, everyone's vacant at Producers and writers also initiate consultations with AGLA on their own when they are working on shows with gay themes. Uszler said that at CBS's request, AGLA reviewed an upcoming afternoon special aimed at teens, "What If I'm Gay." Uszler said AGL.A's role in educating the public is especially important now that AIDS has gripped the attention of heterosexuals and homosexuals alike. "The media can work to change atti­tudes and help people understand who c ....... ~---·-·· .. - .... c:u ..... lll.l.t.: 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 >, Q_ (J) Q_ ~ co :J I 0 0 s6 '\:::;} ~ Morning Afternoon. Evening 7am·Noor 6pm 8plT' 11 10pm 12 30am Mondc:y- :-;a11irday M ~ 1y ~r a ''/ Every N1 int Home of Eagle Leathers Can OC'{"r S 1 25 Or,111 Bttr 75C Well Or l"k~ S1 ShOIS SI 2$ , Lary Thompson, D.J. .t~ °'""""-'-'"""'" N "Well, Frank's hoping for a male and I'd like a little female .... But, really, we'll both be content If ii just has six eyes and eight legs." "For crying out loud, Patrick - sit down . . . . And enough With the 'give me the potatoes or give me death' nonsense." . . .'.• .. I i I ~ I j APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Voice Comics IN1 Cowin SJ"dc8", N W• • Posed before his "wall of meaningful things," we come face to face with Aar­on's simplistic nature. \~EN PAL~VERIN' \NIT\-\ \\.\AT LOWDOWN fbLECAI OVT Blf THE MES A! Tl-IAT MA~Gl/ S\DE~INDER Gl\5 ME 50 l-~Tf.\Efa:D UP I COVLt> ... 1 ~ 9 ~ Spot was confident of getting his walk, right up until his walker got the short end of another domestic squabble. 24 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 Gay and lesbian reading ==============from============= A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS LOVE SEX "'" ..................... -. _... LOVESEX: The horny relat ionsh ip chronicles of Max Exander, by Max Ex­ander, $7 00 Exander gives a vivid dcscript10n of his personal six-month odyssey toward establishing a lasting gay relationship which incorporates safer sex. SECRET DANGERS, by John Preston, $5.00. In this latest installment of the Alex Kane series, ex-marine Kane and his young partner, Danny Fortelli, battle a world-wide terrorist ring that is using violence against gays to promote its own ends. BELDON'S CRIMES, by Robert Rein­hart, $7.00 A grisly sex murder and a homophobic job dismissal suddenly turn Dave Beldon's life upside-down. When he decides to fight for his rights, he becomes the country's most recognized gay man. But soon the question arises: Will Dave Beldon ultimately be the vic­tor - or victim of the three-ring media circus that surrounds him? A new and original novel from the author of A History of Shadows. "Now for my next trick ... " r NOW FOR MY NEXT TRICK , by Michael Willhoite, $5 00. Michael Will­hoite's cartoons have been entertammg readers of The Washington Blade for many years. Now, some 80 of his best cartoons have been collected into this book. EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 .00. Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engrossing - and funniest - you'll ever read. MEOJTERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $12.50. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. I Oversize paperback) THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Fnedel, $7.00. Burton Raider's problems begin in high school when he realizes he's in love with his friend Roman. As he gets older, the problems increase - and so does the humor of his situation, in what Chris­topher Street calls "the funniest gay novel of the year " QUATREFOIL, by James Barr, $8.00. The year is 1946, and Philip Froelich faces a court martial for acting insubor­dinate to a lazy officer during the closing days of World War II. Then he meets Tim Danelaw, and soon the court mar­ual is among the least of Phill ip's con­cerns ...• This classic novel, first published in 1950, remams a romantic and suspense­ful read, an intelligently·written love story that gives a vivid picture of our re­cent but often-forgotten past. SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7 .00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely? Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet instead he finds himself pursu­ing the handsome and unpredictable Mark. Long Time Passing: Lives 01 014kr LeSl>lans ..... Vt' .wdMI. PU LONG TIME PASSING: Lives of Older Lesbians, edited by Marcy Adelman, $8.00. In their own words, women talk about age-related concerns: the fear of losing a lover; the experiences of being a lesbian in the 1940s and 1950s; and issues of loneliness and community. ACT WELL YOUR PART, by Don Sakers, $5.00. When Keith Graff moves with his mother to a new town, he feels like the new kid who doesn't fit in. Then he joins his high school's drama club and meets the boyishly cute Bran Daven­port .. REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $5.00. The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he took a gay date to his high school prom. SEX POSITIVE, by Larry Uhrig, $7 00 Many religious leaders have distorted Biblical passages to condemn homosex­uality. Here Uhng fights back, discuss­mg positive Biblical views of same-sex relationships, and arguing that sexuality and spirituality are closely linked. THE SPARTAN, by Don Harrison, $6.00 In the days of the fi rst Olympics, gay relationships were a common and valued part of life. The Spartan tells the story of a young athlete and his adven­tures in love and war, providing a vivid picture of classical Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our history r A BLACK GAY ANTHOLOGY I IN THE LIFE tNTAODUCTION 8Y SYLVESTUI IN THE LIFE: A black gay anthology, edited by Joseph Beam, $8.00. When Joseph Beam became frustrated that so little gay male literature spoke to him as a black gay man, he decided to do some­thing about it. The result is this an­thology, in which 29 contributors, through stories, essays, verse and art­work, have made heard the voice of a too-often silent minority. THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE, by Heinz Heger, $6.00. Thousands of gays were thrown into Nazi concentration camps for the crime of homosexuality. Heinz Heger is the only one ever to have told his story. Here is a chilling recollection of one of the most frightening chapters of our gay past. WORLDS APART, edited by Camilla Decamin, Eric Garber and Lyn Paleo, $8.00. These collected science fiction stories present a wide array of imagina­tive characters, from a black lesbian vampire to a gay psychodroid. Here is adventure, romance, and excitement - and perhaps some genuine alternatives for our future. ,-----TO ORDER-----j I Enclosed is $ __ . Please send I I the books I've !is ted below. I I (Add $1.00 postage when order- 1 ing just one book; if you order I more than one we'll pay postage.) I I I I Visa and Mastercard accepted; enclose acct. no., exp. date, and signature. Send me these books: name----------- address city ___________ _ state zip ______ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St. Boston, MA 02118 L--------------- CHUTES Come and See Chutes' Dunking Booth at Mary's Vacant Lot Party, April 4 Watch the dunking of Chutes Bar staff, Marion Coleman, Bar Wilson and any other victims we can find! APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 1732 WESTHEIMER Houston, Texas 77098 (713) 523-2213 Mr. Almost Butch Contest (Postponed until April 12) 1st Place-$100 2nd Place-$75 3rd Place-$25 Anyone May Compete! Just be registered by 1:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 11 \ str\p 11pm fr\davs Mae . \ p\ace $"\00 f ,rs d p\ace $25 secon Sundays Lube Wrestling 4pm Coming Soon: A Chutes Original-Male Dancing Company Home of Eagle Leather and Home of S.P.O.T. 26 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 3, 1987 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep it listed here in the Voice where liter­ally thousands turn each week TARGET YOlJR MARKET A brochure, newsletter, promotion can help our business target your goals and '.!ach your market Call 524-0409 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Vo1ceClass1f1ed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 1t on your Ameri­can Express. Diner's Club. MasterCard, Vrsa or Carte Blanche Layout Design, Production Copy Specializing in Retail, Medical and Scientific Areas 523-5606 ANNOUNCEMENTS Join with the Greater Montrose Business Guild and network your business to suc­cess• Call 528-1111 or come by 2412 Taft - KE LLY BRADLEY, M.B.S., R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN lnd1v1dua1, family and group practice limited to coping-stress. role relation­ships and self-concept intervention Office 623-6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voice a general CJrCulat1on news­paper having pubhsheo continuously for over 5 years. is quahf1ed to accept legal notices ANSWERING SERVICES PAGE ME' COMMUNICATIONS SYS­TEMS. 622-4240 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MISSJNGI CALLS? Answering Service One Month Free Computerized Service for your Personal Use. •No T•lephone S• n lce Required •Page Me AHlgns Telephone Nos. • 24 Hour/ 7 D• y Senlce • Your Messages are Private • No Live Operators - No Mittakea- OnJy tl2 monthly (or)~ b) monttw and .-tft 4th month 1'1111. Ask About Free Tria l O ffer Call Jim at 622- 4240 Page Me! Electronic Mets9Q• Center Omce Hours: 10am-4pm Mon.-Fri. ANTIQUES ODEON GALLERY 2117 Dunlavy 521-111 I SEE OUR DISPLAY AC FINDINGS. 2037 "lorfolk. 522-3662 'SEE OUR DfSPLAY AC YESTEAOAY"S WORLD ANTIQUES. 1715 wes1he1rner 526-2646 SEE OUR OISPLA Al r~~~.~~g~ Anllques • Estate Sales conslgnment'S 2037 Norfolk ._, • ..,. •urd and 9'•pl'MnU 5U-S662 T~ Pj~§1 ! 1 "' L1111._ . wm. to SAT. 11-s SUN to TUES. 12-4 ATTORNEY JAMES 0 HESS. 3407 Montrose •205. 521·9216 PHYLLIS FAYE. 723-8368 General prac­tice of law ELAINE SHAW 222-7772. 645-3159 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD To advertise. ca ll 529-8490 during business hours. ELAINE SHAW : g£r~e~:.L,~~:O • Possession • Family Law • Accident 222-7772 or 645-3159 Nol cert by T x Bd ol Spec1ahzat1on AUTO REPAIR MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR. 2516 Genesee (100 Pac1f1c), 526-3723 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD SALVIN AUTOMOTIVE. 5:14-8219 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD STERLING PAINT & BODY CENTERS. 1107-0 Upland Or, 932-9401 SE--E -O-UR- D-ISP-LAY A-D TAFT AUTOMOTIVE. 1411 Taft, 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 Carburetor Spe<. 101 st flectnca1 Repairs All Brake Wark WORRIED ABOUT YOUR CAR? Let Bruce , '' John ch.-.ck it out Experienced. Dependabl· Mechanic. Reasonab1 .. Rates SALVIN AUTOMOTIVE 524-8219 720 w. 11th 861-2846 BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Haircuts, etc. by Mike SPE< IAI. Fnrinls S IO Shampoo Cut & llli-w Dry Si·I by Mike ( wnphn11 nl.1n Ht-. r ,\ \\1111 \llllh Appo11U11H nt Mon-Fri().(, S.11urd,I\~ 11-:1 D1no·s Barber Shop.302W 11th Haircuts $6 up. 863-1520 tor appointment Tommy's Barber Shop. haircuts S 10 and up 2154 Portsmouth Appointments 528- 8216 HAIRCUTS BY MIKE. 522-3003 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD JON BARTON, 1515'h Dunlavy. 522-7866 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ~~ SALON 1515!.4 Dunlavy 522-7866 BARS Knew Mood Nu-bar Second dnnk com­plimentary with mention of this ad. 1336 Westheimer 529-3332 GAY BARS The following list are only lhe gay bars which have placed a recent advertisement in the Voice For information on these bars. please see their ads. For 1nformat1on on other bars (such as type of cllentele). call the Gay Switchboard at 529-3211 or see their ads in other publications CAMP CLOSET, 109 Tuam, 528-9814 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CHUTES.-ii32 Westhe1mer, 523-2213 ~E_ OUR El¥~~ y AD DIRTY SALL Y'S, 2W Avondale, 529-7525 SEE OUR DISPlAY AD E/J'S. 2517 Ralph at Westheimer, 527-9071 SEE OIJR DISPLAY AD K"J's. 11830 Airline. 445-5849 S_EE OUR DISPlA Y AD MARY"S. 1022 Westhe1mer 528-8851 SEE OUR DISPLAY A[,, MEN-EAGY. 911 W Drew 522-7524 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MICHAELS. 428 Westhe1mer, 529-2506 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RENDEZVOUS. 1100 Westhe1mer. 527-8619 S-EE -O-UR DISP-LAY AD - THE 611. 611 Hyde. 528-9079 S-EE -OUR DIS-P-LAY AD - VENTURE-N. 2923 Main. 522-0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BONDSMAN A-QUICK BAIL BONDS Fast. courteous. discreet. all type of bonds made Michael E Standage. agenl Mention the Voice for $25 off all quallf1ed bonds. 678-4488, 621-8452 BOOKKEEPING BOOKKEEPING SERVICE Personal. commercial. taxes 467-3871 BOOTS Oh Boy1 Oua1,1y Boots. 912 Westhe1mer 524-7859 CARS AND BIKES 1976 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham de Elegance Runs great Just bought new car_ Don't need two $800 firm to good family Call 526-6413 Rick Swainston SELL YOUR CAR through a Montrose Voice class1f1ed ad Call 529-8490 STERLING Chauffer driven Rolls Royces avallable fo r all occasions or just for the fun of It Call Ken at 932- 9401 CHURCHES KINGDOM COMMUNITY CHURCH. 614 E 19th, 88(}-3527. 351-4217 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CENTER FOR A POSIT IVE LIFESTYLE. 531-6600 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Center for a Positive Lifestyle A Lo\.tng. MAt.aphy.'1\cal, SplrltU&l Celebr aLlon meets UOwn\.Own l:ollday Inn, 801 Ca.lhouri every Monday 8pm <or more Info. DIAi 497- PRAY Kingdom Community Church "'Jom Our Family m 1987 614 E. 19th Sundays 11am 880·3527 or 3514217 CLEANING SVCS Hate housework? Let Lavelle (713) 529- 0228 SERVICE PLUS A Quality Cleaning Service Resldenllal • Commercial e BONDED e Jell Cunningham 522-3451 COFFEE COFFEE & TEA WORLD. 3939-R Montrose. 524-8536 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Coffee & Tea World Gourmet Coffee • Fine Teas Accessories 3939-R Montrose Blvd_ 713-524-8536 CONSIGNMENTS FINDINGS. 2037 Norfolk. 522-3662 SEE OUR DfSPLAY AD CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING ALL AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION. 827-1422 or 497-5228 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD HSK CONTRACTING. 520-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD COUNSELING DR NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 Welch. 527-8680 "'iEE OUR DISPLAY AD DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. ODS 427 Westhe,mer 524-0538 E CUR OfSPLAY AD RONALD A PETERS. DOS 620 W Ala bama 523-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Wes1he1mer Hou~ton . 1 X 7 /OOh f\.11,nci<ly 1hru S.11lnd,11 Hours by App111n1mc11r (713) 524 0538 DWELLINGS. ROOMMATES. HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT. LEASE MontrosP roommate. share two bedroom house S 190 plus bills 528-3214 HEIGHTS HOUSE Newly renovated 2-1. beautiful trees on large private lot. Sunny rooms with hard­woods Formals. high ceilings_ New energy efficient centrals. Kitchen with great stove and breakfast area $550 per mQllth plus references 88(}-8141, 869- 3261 days Ask for Neil. ------ FREE APT. & HOME LOCATING Houston/ Galveston area Let me help Call Rob (713) 981-5560 Montrose one bedroom apt. in small quiet complex with pool. security gates. laundry fac1ht1es. cable available. Adults No pets $1CJO dep. $265 plus electric. 713- 529-8178 GREENWAY PLACE APARTMENTS. 3333 Cummins. 623-2034 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD VOICE AOVERTISfNG WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Voice Class1f1ed. Call 529-8490 And ~~:r8fu1~~C~~~r :i~n°~~~~nMEaxit~;C~r~i~; Visa EMPLOYMENT. JOBSWANTEO Sales representatives needed for expand­ing company Quick advancements now for many pos1t1ons. Commission Mr Manning 529-9990 Now acceptinQapplications for barbacks. door, general maintenance {part hme) and clean up personnel. Contact Dick or Pickles at Mary's 527-9669. Houston M1dtowne Spa 1s accepting applications, cashier experience pre­ferred Recent photo required. 522-2379. 3100 Fannin INSIDE ADVERTISING SALES Wanted. Bright. very articulate individu­als with a good business sense to work with established performing arts publica­tions Call Mr Schwartz 526-5323. 11am- 3pm Female keyboard player needed for accompanying singer Please call Gerry at 661 3873 PERFORMING ARTS Box office seeks qualified personnel, excellent verbal skills reqU1red After­noon. evening or both. Call Mr. Schwartz 526-5323 ESTA TE SALES FlNOINGS. 2037 Norfolk, 522-3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO FENCES NORTH STAR FENCE CO .. 694-9113 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD FLOWERS CLASSIC DESIGNS OF- HOUSTON. 1811 Indiana. 523-3791 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD (MISC.) FOR SALE BALDWIN PIANOS At factory direct d1sco~nt prices For 1nformat1on call 8111 Shirley 713-528· 3333 FOR YARD SALES Sec ads under "Yard Sales· at the end of the Voice Classifieds FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 1218 Welch. 528-3851 Sff OUR DISPlAY AD CREMATION SERVICE INTERNATIONAL. 692-5555. 363-9999 SU OUR DISPLAY AD GENEDLOGY Genealogy research in US & U K Expe· nenced and accredited. Mr Craig Alb1s· ton 622-3216 GIFTS CHRISTMAS CRITTERS. 1318 Nance Sf f OUR DISPLAY AD HAULING HAULING, ETC. Pick up and delivery. hauling. bonded Jeff Cunningham. 522-3451. INSTRUCTION CAREER INSTITUTE, 3015 Richmond, 529-2778 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PARALEGAL ·CLASSES • TEA Approved • Tuition Financing • Placement Assistance CAREER INSTITUTE 529-2778 3015 Richmond Ave. INSURANCE Don't have health insurance? "Uninsura­ble" for any reason? Call Frank Turner (713) 522-6558 AL'S INSURANCE SERVICE. 4108 Fan­nin. 529-0140 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CYNTHIA H M_A_N_S_K_E _R- IN_S_URA_N_C_E_, • 3311 W. Alabama #100, 522-2792 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Are your tired of struggling with the high cost of Insurance? Call today for a free competitive quote. Cynthia H. Mansker Insurance Agency 522-2792 Auto e HCNMOWMl'I e "entWI e LHt Hotllh. C-rdal LAWN CARE BETTER LAWNS & GARDENS. 523-LAWN SfE OUR DISPLAY AD STIXX AND CHIPS INC., 665-62-94,-- 332-4443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Stixx and Chips, Inc. 665-6294 or 332-4443 We do yards, repair and build wood fences, light hauling, lawn care, light mov­ing, house cleaning, painting, gutters, small house repairs. Free Estimates MEDICAL CARE STEVE D MARTINEZ, MD .. 12 Oaks Tower. 4126 SW Fwy #1000. 621-7771 MILITARY CLOTHES KILROYS, 1723 Waugh, 528-2S18 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MODELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS Massage. young masseuse, full one hour session City he. Rick 680-9750 MICHAEL & FRIENDS Personalized body rubs. quality compan­ionship. Also models & dancers. 522- 3714. REGISTERED MASSEUSE Relaxation or remedial, convenient loca­llon, one hour $30. 988-2910 A PREMIUM SERVICE Body Rub 24 hrs. 526-3711 Needing a hot black male escort for a hot. physica l and daily workout? Just call and ask for Adam 663-6269 Call 24 hrs. a day Bodyrub by Dan Muscular. hairy. hand· some. healthy. (713) 278-7380 Deep muscle, sensuous body rub, even­ings and weekends Leave message Steve 640-8690 Rubdowns by Robb. 528-1881 THE CADILLAC OF MASSAGE by David D of EI (713) 520-8232 STOP getting rubbed the wrong way Call Carl 622-3942 late night For exciting. tun-filled body rub Call Peter al 464-8781 Body rubs by Bill. after 6pm weekdays. 24 hours weekends 529-3970 St1mulal1ng bOdy rubs Out calls 529- 3970 MOVERS MOVEMASTERS Boxes. too!' Visa. MC, Amex welcome 1925 Weslhe1mer 630-6555. NURSE CARE ATTENTION Life partners/ families of PWA's Team of two nurses will provide total care in your home. Reasonable rates 520-7636. PAPER HANGING ALL AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION-. - 827-1422 or 497-5228 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Paper Hanging and Vinyl Resigentlal and Commercial All Types Remodeling All AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228 PERSONALS HOT MEN 24 HOURS Thousands of horny men waiting to get it on and oet 1t off with you now' Don·t do 1t alone' Join the original Low Cost Sex Link. Private. confidential (415) 346-8747 33 year old GWM boy looking for GWM daddy for lasting relationship 680-8009. MICHAEL H. t need you. Come back KEVIN W GWM, 22. looking for hot men. 25-35 for friendship, fun times and maybe more. Robert 529-6330. Passionate. affectionate, GWM. °24: s·9··- 130, seeks masculine. dominant. Leo male. Must appreciate laughter. honesty. excitement and messing around Reply Blind Box 336-M c/o Voice. Sexy blonde stud looking for fun and games with a man and woman. Photo and phone no. requested Reply Blind Box 335-J c/o Voice. 21 yr old G/HJMSeeks a Sincere:tionest. 20-30 yr. old who en1oys all performing and visual arts for a fulfilling relationship Reply Blind Box 335-M c/o Voice. 20 yr. old, GWM boy, looking for GWM leather daddy who's into hght S&M. Reply Blind Box 334-R c/o Voice THE RIGHT CONNECTION, 976-9696 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD LIVE ACrfON NETWORK. 976-SSOO­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD THE MEN"S CONNECTION. 976-2MEN SEE OUR DISPLAY AD - PLAY ... - --­•. safely al J 0 E. Meetings 5 nights a week And 11's fun (See our other ads.) RULES-FOATHE PER~;"ONALS: Person­als (and other advertising) should not describe or imply a description of sexual organs or acts. No Personals should be directed to minors. Advertising must be '"positive.'" not ""negative.'" (If you have certain preferences 1~ other people. fist the qualities you desire Please don"t be negative by listing the kinds of people or qualities you don't desire.) Thank you. and happy hunting AN EROTIC ADVENTURE The Society of J 0 E. a private organiza­t ion for reasonably attractive adult QaY men, meets 5 nights weekly. Adm1ss1on t imes are 8-9pm Tues & Thurs .• 11 pm- 1 :45am Fri. & Sal, 6-9pm Sun. at the Cot­tage Playhouse. 611 Pacific (Rear of house. Look for PlaySafe flag.) CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Henry's One-Hour Photo has moved to 408 Avondale. in the same building as the Montrose Voice. Open Monday-Friday 9am-6pm SAFE SEX? For your mental health. have sex . For your physical health. make 1t safe sex. Safe sex 1s where there are no bodily fluids exchanged. The virus which leads to an AIDS cond1t1on 1s believed usually trans­mitted from one person to another from blood or semen Those who are "recep­t ive" are especially at risk. Do condoms protect? They certainly help But con­doms MUST be used with a water-based lubricant (the new product Lubrasept1c is especially recommended). Petroleum or vegetable-based lubricants will actually dissolve the condom and eliminate the protection Please ""Play Safe ... A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads. In their book, '"Classified Affairs."" they"ll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all those funny little abbreviations mean Send $8 to ··c1ass1f1ed Affairs." Alyson Pub .. Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. St. Boston. MA 02118 (Also included W•ll be a coupon for $5 off on your next Personals in your choice of 25 pubhcat1ons, including the Voice.) APRIL 3, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 e Chronicle Features, 1987 The stock market is like whether or not to ask you to marry me. Every day seems too late again. LISA'S RECORDED LOVE STORIES ** SHE WILL WHISPER * SWEET NOTHINGS IN * * YOUR EAR. * : 0 cA 1 RLELCT 1-900-410-3600 : 1-900-410-3700 * NOW! 1-900-410-3800 * * NO MEMBERSHIP NECESSARY * 50• •011 •• , •• """loll• * JS• HCl'I .IOOthO,,al * * * * * * * * * ~ PEST CONTROL TEXAS TERM 0 PEST. 526-1111 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL. 25131> Elmen. 524-9415. 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD 1--------1 TERMITES MUNCHING? I ~fr5111 TERMITES 25'11 off I I • -RO-ACH-ES •3-2'" I 1 IW--. ..~....".. °"""" C--'lft "6 I ,_ - -T~SJ!R~ ~T- I PETS TOM'S PRETTY FISH. 224 Westhe1mer. 520-6443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO PET CARE PET PLEASEAS. 8787 S Gessner. 776-3383 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALLI Printing and developing. enlargements, jumbo pnnts, film. Kodak paper, 2615 Waugh Dr. 520-1010. HENRY'S 1 HOUR PHOTO. 408 Avon­dale. 529-8490 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PRINTING SPEEDY PAINTING, 5400 B~ellaire Blvd. 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PSYCHOLOGISTS JEFFi3i:AcKWELL. AN. MA 3131 East­s1de Suite 340. 523-8357 6Fi. NICHOLAS ED-D, 2128 Welch. 527- 8680 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RESTAURANTS Chicken • Fish • Pasta 2 for 1 Anytime with this Coupon per Party of Two Orders to Go, Call 520-5221 -w-. Ala-bam-a a-t Sh-eph-erd - I I I HUNGRY INTERNATIONAL, 2356 Rice Blvd .• 523-8650 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CHARLIE"S. 1102 Westhe1mer. 522-3332 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CAFE EDI. W. Alabama at Shephard. 520-5221 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD POT PIE. 15_2_5_W_e_s-th- e-,m-er- .-528-4350 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VIET NAM RESTAURANT. 3215 Main at ~~~'8u~2g,s~J~ AD 'tHE J>O't VIE Open 24 Hours a Day 1525 wes1heimer 528-4350 SUPERMARKETS KROGER. 3300 Montrose SEE OUR DISPLAY AD TAX PREPARATION INCOME TAX PREPARATION Tax returns. IRS Tax problems. audits Taxes are our business-Our only busi­ness Tax Consultants of Houston 468- 6199 TIRES THE TIRE PLACE, 1307 Fairview. 529- 1414 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ·~~ 529-1414 1 THE 111\£ PLACE /-\LL BRAND!::i 1307 Fairview - 3 blks West of Montrose TRAVEL For all your travel needs, one call does it all. Free ticket delivery in Montrose area Exciting gay destinations, a complete FREE service to you anytime. Robert 529- 6330 FRANKLIN HOUSE DENVER 303 331-9106 520-8108 in Houston for info A Guest House at 1620 Franklin Denver, CO 80218 Ratf>-. ~'.: -$1R Sim From $;. Oouhle SPLASH DAY "87 . For tickets and information Robert 529- 6330 NEW ORLtANS GUEST HOUSE. 1118 Ursulines. (504) 566-1177 SEE DUR OISPLA Y AD ---.--- - - FRANKLIN GUEST HOUSE, 1620 Franklin. Denver. Co .. (303) 331-9106 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD TYPESETTING SAME DAY TYPESETTERS. 408 Avondale. 529-08490 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VIDEO LOBO VIDEO. 1424-C Westhe1mer. 522-5156 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VIDEOTAPEC~O~P~Y~l~N~C~.•- 3 0::-::--:173--~ Fountamview. 781-0033 SEE OVR DISPLAY AD VIDEO TAPE COPV .. c OON"T LOSE OR ERASE THAT PRECIOUS VIDEO "HAVE A COPY MADE" or COPY/EOIT YOUR HOME VIOEO IN THE PRIVACY O
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