Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 80, May 7, 1982
File 001
File size: 13.62 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 80, May 7, 1982 - File 001. 1982-05-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10469/show/10444.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-07). Montrose Voice, No. 80, May 7, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10469/show/10444

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 80, May 7, 1982 - File 001, 1982-05-07, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10469/show/10444.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 80, May 7, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 7, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript v Mickey Leland chosen GPW. Grand Marshal. Club Owner Marion Coleman and club manager Andy Mills picked as Parade Marshals Montrose News, page 3 0 I c .. The Newspaper of Montrose ,.---___,....,. ished Weekly E .. I'\\: l ~' 1day May 7 1982 Good Evening Montrose weather tonight: Fair and mild with a low of 56". Saturday: Sunrise 6:33AM. Fair and warm with a high of 82". Sunset 8:03PM. MSA Softball season enters 5th week; Dirty Sa lly's sti unbeaten; Barn wins first game. Montrose Sports, ·page6 Finding a good house to fix up in Montrose not easy Neighborhood, page 11 The Ritchies Family: real live energy Montrose Live, page 13 Around the live theaters Montrose Live, page 14 2 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 May 11-15: Donna Corley with Charlene Wright iJ'Iay 18-2~ & 25-29: Sally Mayes with Billy Stritch . . . Upon hearing the first song, you'll know why she's been ____ J dubbed "Super Singer" Terry Meason May9&10 Accompanied by Charlene Wright Montrose News MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Mills and Coleman picked as Parade Marshals Leland chosen Grand Marshal for Pride Week With more than 200 people attending, local community figures Marion Coleman and Andy Mills were selected parade mar­shals for the 1982 Gay Pride Parade at the Gay Pride Week '82 Committee meeting while U.S. Congressman Mickey Leland was chosen Grand Marshal. Coleman and Mills had been expected to be chosen; the surprise was the rauccus and rollicking nature of the selection pro· cess. Larry Bagneris Jr. presided over the meeting which crowded Kindred Spirts, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, to near capacity with groups of supporters for the major candidates: Andy Mills, Walter Strick· Jury deadlocks in 'Men's Room' obscenity case A five-woman, one-man jury May 5 said they were unable to reach a verdict in the obscenity trial of the movie The Men's Room, shown recently at the French Quar­ter Theater, 3201 Louisiana. County Court-at-Law Judge Jimmie Duncan then declared a mistrial. The women on the jury said they found the film personally offensive, but none­the- less thought it was not offensive if judged by "standards of the gay community"-standards which Judge Duncan instructed them to use in trying to reach a verdict. The one man on the jury was the holdout for a guilty verdict. Rauscher and Co., operator of the French Quarter, was the defendant. The film had been confiscated and a clerk arrested Jan. 26. The case of the clerk remained pending. The trial lasted three days. Testifying for the defense were political activist Ray Hill, gay businessmen Jim Flock and Warren Duncanson, and activist Kent Naasz. land, Danny Villa, Marion Coleman and Charlotte Archer. Before the election began, Bagneris had moved that the selection of parade mar­shals be done by the committee heads for Gay Pride Week. His motion was clearly rejected by the crowd, anxious to get on with the voting. Earlier in the afternoon, Bagneris intro· duced a motion, which passed, to prohibit similar at-large community participation in future Gay Pride Week Committee activities. Next year's selections will be on the basis of attendance at planning meet· ings rather than by community Also taking the stand for the defense was a communications expert from the University of Houston. Political activist Gary Van Ooteghem testified for the prosecution-a fact that greatly angered other Montrose political activists. Montrose Ventures, operator of adult bookstores in Montrose, is also charged with obscenity in possessing the same film, but their trial had been delayed pend­ing the outcome of the French Quarter case. Cowboy mania perils the anteater Pacific New• Service Wildlife protectionists are complaining that the rage for cowboy footwear may be stamping out a rare variety of anteater. The diamond-patterned scaly hide of the Pangolin is much sought after for the fancy boots, which retail for up to $1000 a pair. More than 30,000 Pagolin skins were imported into the country in 1980, but! participation. Andy Mills was selected over Walter Strickland and Danny Villa as the male parade marshal. The selection of the female parade marshal was the final item of business, with Ms. Coleman defeating Miss Charlotte in a show of hands voting procedure. Voting for the various candidates was primarily block voting. When hands were raised, they were clustered together in groups around the club rather than ran­dom patterns of raised hands throughout. The tone of the meeting was lively and competitive. since the Pangolin is listed as a protected species, each had to be accompanied by a special permit. . "A lot of the permits list the skins of 'Japanese Pangolins'," says Phoebe Wray of the Center for Action on Endangered Species. "And the 'Japanese Pangolin' isn't protected because there's no such animal." Her group has been trying to convince bootmakers to lay off the Pangolin, so far with little result. The case of the missing cases While cattle-rustling is on the rise nation­wide, dairies are beefing about a different problem, reports the Philadelphis Inquirer. Thousands of milk cases, costing nearly $6 apiece, are being stolen from dairies each year, to wind up in dens and bed­rooms, holding record albums, books and assorted junk. In California a lone last year, $10 million worth of cases were swiped, prompting 19 major dairies to establish "the coalition for milk case recovery." Says coalition leader Jack Miller, "We may not get 'em today, but we'll get 'em tomorrow or next week." Montrose Mouth Rosa dela Maria "Rosa dela Maria" was the name chosen for the "Name the Burro" contest at Mary's last Wednesday, a name sug­gested by Todd. There were several sugges­tions for it be named Andy B. DeMills, but they were passed over. Now to the big rumor of the week: the new condos going up at 1022 Westheimer. Totally false, says Andy Mills. Mary's lease still has years to run. Say, did you hear the one about Mary's buying the Drum, which bought the Loading Dock, which bought the Parade. Musical bars. But not true. -·- The Montrose Clinic can always use help but currently has special needs for volun­teer nurses. Got a few extra hours? Give 'em a call. -·- Earl Gregory, who puts out the news letter of Episcopal Integrity, has this little item in his May edition: The "Q" in English (and in most Scrab­ble words) is always followed by "U" because, after the Nor­man conquest in 1066, French scribes substituted the French "Qu" for the Anglo­Saxon "Cw," which began many words. That's why we're "Queer," not "Cweer." Oh well. (Earl admits he st.ole the item from The Integer, new­sletter of the Chicago chapter of gay Escopallans. -·- Dirty Sally's continues as the hottest team in the MSA Soft­ball League, now with 4 wins, no losses. Other major items from last week are: The Barn won their first game, Mary's shut-out the Briar Patch­and, oh woe is us, the VOICE lost its third straight-and it's second straight loss by one point. Well, this weekend at Levy Field there are eight games­but the VOICE gets the wee­kend off. -·- Do you believe that 7-Eleven has the gaul to construct a store right next door to the U­Totum on Alabama, next to Stu dz? They must figure this is a good neighborhood to make money in. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 The place to be for the best in LIVE entertainment SUNDAY MAY9 Customer appreciation night with ANGELA CLEMMONS. Special door cover and special drink prices, plus other surpr1• ses. This is our way of thanking you for your support. Doors open 9pm Coming Monday, May 10 Ex-Sex Pistols The Professionals General admission at door. Doors open 9pm Coming Sunday, May 16 -"" __ _._ Pete Shelley Homosapien Advance tickets available at Real Records, Record Rack and Numbers 2 Coming Saturday, May22 May Theme Party "Celestial Fantasy" 's 'P 300 Westheimer Houston 526-655 l OPEN WEDNESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY GPW exciting, GPC meeting routine By William Marberry Montrose Voice The Gay Political Caucus meeting of May 5 was not very exciting; it was the usual, expected post-election crowing about how one-third of the endorsed candidates won and another third were now in runoffs. There was lots of praise for the power of bloc-voting. The most important revelation was that 40 Democrats and 9 Republicans would be attending the May 15 senatorial distict caucuses as pro-gay delegates. Otherwise, This item contains opinions of the writer the adgenda was a post-election cntique of a low tum-out, low interest election. Still, GPC considered the election to be a success for them. And that was the topic of discussion, including "a round of applause in appreciation of the good job we all did this election." If you were going to miss a meeting, this would have been a good one to miss. Besides, all the real political action had already taken place earlier in the week, on Sunday, at the Gay Pride Week meetings held at Kindred Spirits. It was real action, and real political. Just before 2:00 p.m., Charlotte Archer ("Miss Charlotte") arrived at the Kindred Spirits, accompanied by approximately 40 cowboys, for the voting for Gay Pride Week parade marshal. The vote for parade marshal was not scheduled until 4:00 p.m., so she and her cow-pokes left to return at 4:00. Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright'· 1982 Office hours: 10am-6pm Henry McCiurg publisher/editor Billie Duncan entertainment/sports editor Ed Martinez reporter-at-large Acel Clark graphics William Marberry advertising director Randy Brown advertising David Petluck advertising Lyt Harris advertising Member Gay Press Association Texas Gay News Association News Services International Gay News Agency Pacific News Service Syndicated Feature Services & Writers (San Francisco) Chronicle Features United Feature Syndicate Jeffrey Wilson Randy Alfred Stonewall Feature Syndicate Brian McNaught Kurt Erichsen POSTMASTf;R: Send address corrections to 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Subscription rate in US: $49 per year (52 issues), $29 per six months (26 ieeues), or $L25 per week Oess than 26 issues). Notional advertising representative: Joe DiSabato, Rivendell Marketing, 666 6th Avenue, New York 10011, (212) 242-6863 Advertising deadline: Each Tueeday, 6:()()pm, for iuue reJeased each Friday evening MAY 7.1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 By the time Miss Charlotte and her cow­boys returned at 4:00, the word had appar­ently spread around Montrose that the vote was going to be done by packing the house. And it was a packed club before the vote was finally taken near 5:00 p.m. All five major candidates had groups of sup­porters at Kindred Spirits. When Larry Bagneris Jr. called the meeting to order at 4:00 p.m., there were approximately 250 people in attendance, and most were anxious to get on with the vote. Except that Bagneris did not seem anx­ious to get on with the voting. Earlier in the afternoon, at a regular business meet­ing of the Gay Pride Week committee heads, Bagneris introduced a motion to insure such a packed-house situation would never occur again. Next year's vot­ing will be done by those who attend the GPW meetings rather than by community­at- large participation. Bagneris specu­lated that cards would be passed out at the first GPW meeting and then punched at each meeting so that only the meeting-attenders May 11, 1981: NBC said it would keep King The NBC network said it would be keeping tennis pro Billie Jean King as a commentator. The network said that "unless there are additional developments, Billie will be at the microphones for us at Wimbledon." May 12, 1981: GPC president filed suit against city Gay Political Caucus president Lee Harring­ton said on the steps of City Hall that he had filed earlier a personal lawsuit in Federal District Court against the City of Houston for his loss of a city job when he was elected president of the GPC in 1980. Harrington had worked as an official for the Greater Houston Convention and Vis· itors Council. May 12, 1981: Proposed new law would have let police, at their option, issue tickets for "homosexual conduct" The Texas House tentatively passed a bill that would have let law enforcement officers have an option on whether to arrest certain misdemeanor law violators, or just to issue a ticket. May 12, 1981: Robbery attempt made on firemen Th~ee Houston firemen who had just helped extinguish a car fire in Montrose were then held at gunpoint by two men trying to rob them. would be able to vote. Bagneris also made an attempt to defer this year's selection to the committee-heads but the 250 anxious participants prompt!; voted the motion down. When the vote was finally taken the odds­on favorites came out the clear win'ners with Marion Coleman and Andy Mills ch~sen. However, the in-between was an absolute politiC?I circus. The show-of-hands voting, when 1t came, was by clumps of committed "delegates." There seemed to be little devia­tion from the bloc voting. . There were some unusual political coali­tions assembled on the floor that will be talked about for years. In reality, the entire afternoon will be talked about for years, long after Saturday's low-interest primary is for­gotten, the show-down at Kindred Spirits will be talked about. And probably never to be duplicated in Montrose. It was the meeting to have been at for local politics this week. Certainly more so that Wednesday'~ GPC meeting, which will mos.t certamly be repeated again and agam. One Year Ago No one was injured in the early morning robbery at the comer of West Main and Hazard, according to reports attributed to Capt. J.J. Esterak, one of the three victims. May 12, 1981: Art Fest representative presented specific proposal for closing Westheimer A leader of the Westheimer Colony Art Association presented City Council with a specific proposed ordinance which would have allowed Westheimer Street to be closed off during the twice-a-year Westheimer Arts Festival. John Green of 412 Westheimer also told the council that he had a petition signed by 18,000 people that would have put the issue of the closure of the street on a referendum if the city failed this time to act. May 13, 1981: Montrose man pied innocent to Caribbean overthrow plot Michael Eugene Perdue, 32, of the 1600 block of Marshall in Montrose, and eight other alleged mercenaries pleaded innocent to fed· eral charges of conspiring to overthrow the Caribbean government of Dominica. The charges claimed Perdue and the others were wanting to restore to power the small island's deposed prime minister. May 13, 1981: Harvard said it would apologize The students who put out Harvard's year­book were preparing an apology to the uni­versity's gay community for calling an undergraduate house a "haven for homosexuals." Got an opinion about a subject raised in the Voice? Write us. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose,' #306, Houston, TX 17006. Advertisers in the Montrose Voice: Clubs Bacchus, 523 Lovett, 523-3396 Baja's, 402 Lovett, 527-9866 The Barn, 710 Pacific, 528-9427 Briar Patch, 2294 W. Holcombe, 665-9678 The Deep, Grant at Jackson, 528-8234 E/ J's, 1213 Richmond, 527-9071 The Galleon, 2303 Richmond, 522-7616 Grant Street Station, 911 Fairview, 528-8342 Happy Trails Membership Club, 715 Fairview, 521-2792 Hole, 109 Tuam, 528-9066, Keyboard, 3012 Milam, 528-6988 Lampost, 2417 Times Blvd, 52&8921 Mary's, 1022 Westheimer, 528-8851 Miss Charlotte's Dance Hall & Saloon, 911 W. Drew, 528-8840 Numbers 2, 300 Westheimer, 526-6551 Pink Elephant, 1218 Leland, 659-0040 Rascals, 2702 Kirby, 524-6272 Venture-N, 2923 Main-522-0000 Eateries Gyro Gyros Sandwich Shoppe, 1536 Westheimer, 528-4655 Harrar's, 428 Westheimer, 526-2895 Star Pizza, 2111 Norfolk, 523-0800 Travel agents Houston Travel Consultants, Greenspoint Travel Center, 820-4227 Montrose Travel, 2506 Ralph, 522-8747 TravelTech, 5719 Kirby Drive, Suite 20, 522-8227 Flowers Blue Iris, 3618 S. Shepherd, 523-1827 Jardin de St. Francis, 1016 Peden, 529-7576 The Plant House, 812 Westheimer, 529-6050 Richard Allen Florist, 1848 Westheimer, 526-7795 Banks/Savings & Loans Mainland Savings, 3401 Allen Parkway, 527-8446 General services ATCO Pest Control, 988-1331 Bed House, 2115 Norfolk, 523-8278 Ding a Ling Monkeyshines, 521-0565 Moppeta Cleaning Service, 493-6341 Reed's Keys, 1620 Commonwealth, 523-2927 Business services Speedy Printing Service of Bellaire, 5400 Bellaire Blvd, 667-7417 3317 Montrose Building (Office Leasing), 3317 Montrose Blvd, 626-8880 Art gallery The Clemmons Gallery, 803 Marshall, 520-5353 Professional services James D. Kristian, PhD (Hypnologist), 977-2485 M. Robert Schwab, attorney, 526-9139 Clothing Company B, 5366 Westheimer, 965-9753 Shoe Warehouse, 2024 Westheimer 524.S606 • Private clubs/baths (gay) Box Office, 1625 Richmond, 522-1625 Midtowne Spa, 3100 Fannin, 522-2379 6 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 Sports Mary's shuts out Briar Patch, Barn wins first game Dirty Sally's continues to dominate the diamond By Billie Duncan A good-looking Galleon team, fortified by the return of Don Kessler, could not put a stop to the awesome hitting power of Dirty Sally's. After four games, Dirty Sally's has already become not only a force but the force with which to reckon. And most peo­ple reckon that they will keep on winning. Five of the top 11 hitters reported by MSA statistics are on the Dirty Sally's team, including the number one and two hitters, shortstop Jesse Young (.769) and pitcher Don Davidson (.692). In last Sunday's game, Mario Marchena carved a niche in the top hitter standings with a 4 for 5 day that left his average at a healthy .563. Jerry DeSale further heaped on the hit­ting coals with two 3-run scorchers that required the use of searching parties behind the chain-link fence. Don Kessler did what he could for the Galleon by stepping up to the plate and immediately splitting the air with a 3-run homer. But even with the power and talent of the Galleon, the final score was definately in Dirty Sally's favor to the tune of20 to 8. • Other games Mary's (who have lost only to Dirty Sal­ly's) shut out the Briar Patch, 13-0. John Pallia and Mario Blanco led the team in their second win of the season. So now, Mary's is tied with Brazos River Bottom and Montrose Mining Company for the second place honors in the North Division. Last Week, the VOICE warned readers not to count the Barn team out just because they had lost their first three games. The article went on to say, "They just might surprise their next opponent." Apparently the friendly encouragement from the press helped. On Sunday, they defeated the Montrose Voice team 13-12. Mark Hall and Andy Uriega led the Barn to victory with 2 for 2 and 2 for 3 respectively. This is the second game in a row that the Montrose Voice has lost by 1 run. Perhaps their next opponent should watch out. The last game of the day was Jim's Gym against the Mining Company. At the end of four innings, Jim's Gym was leading the Mining Companv at a comfortable 8-3. MSA Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Sunday, May 2 Mary's 13 Briar Patch 0 Barn 13 Montrose Voice 12 Dirty Sally's 20 Galleon 8 Montrose Mine 9 Jim's Gym 8 STANDINGS Won Lost Pct GB South Division Galleon 2 2 .500 A&KJewelry 1 1 .500 Jim's Gym 1 2 .333 Briar Patch 1 3 .250 Montrose Voice 1 3 .250 North Division Dirty Sally' 8 4 0 1.000 Brazos Riv Bottom 2 1 .667 Mary's 2 1 .667 Montrose Mining 2 1 .667 Barn 1 3 .250 THIS WEEK'S GAMES (All aam• at Levy Field. Frum Montrooe, ro out Richmond. put Kirby, left on Euwide.) Saturday, Ma.y 8 Galleon vs. Barn, 5pm 'h 1 1 1 1 1 3 Dirty Sally's vs. Jim's Gym, 6pm Montrose Mining vs. A&K Jewelry, 7pm Brazoa Riv Bottom vs. Briar Patch, 8pm Sunday, May 9 Montrose Mining vs. Mary's, 6pm Dirty Sally's vs. Barn, 7pm Galleon vs. Briar Patch, 8pm A&K Jewelry vs. Jim's Gym, 9pm Then in the 5th, the Mining Company came alive after Wayne Romero knocked a 1-out single that drove in 2 runs. The high­energy rally netted a total of 6 runs, put­ting the Mining Company ahead of Jim's Gym. For the rest of the game, the Mining Company's defense shutdown any further action from Jim's Gym. The final score was 9-8 in an exciting tum-around win for the Mining Company. • MSA tennis champs Montrose sunshine must be part of the breakfast of champions. The reigning Texas Cup champs are none other than the top ball swatters of MSA Tennis. This year's Texas Cup will take place June 26 at the Memorial Tennis Center in Houston. Bobby Hopkins and Fred Lopez are sure to be there. Scenes from last week's Mary's vs. Briar Patch Game, which Mary's won, 13-0. LEADING Hl'ITERS (Based on 9 or more at-bats through May 2) Player ITeam) AB R H A VG. 1. J. Young (Sally'•) 13 7 10 .769 2. D. Davidson (Sally'a) 13 8 9 .692 3. G. Mantle (Mary'•) 9 3 6 .667 4. R. Gore (Galleon) 11 6 7 .636 R. Martin (Voice) 11 2 7 .636 6. V. Harris (Voice) 12 10 8 .583 7. M. Morrison (Sally'a) 14 9 8 .571 8. M. Marchena (Sally'a: 16 10 9 .563 9. D. Hoke (Jim'• Gym) 9 4 5 .556 K. Bailey <Sally'•) 9 7 5 .556 R. Kennison (A&K) 9 5 5 .556 MSA Women's Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Sunday, May 2 Renegades 15 Ducks Kindred Spirits Hell Raisers Twins 17 Royal A's 19 Chuck's Angels 11 Special Blend STANDINGS 3 0 0 5 Won Loat Pct GB Renegades 2 - 1.000 Hell Raisers 2 1.000 Armadillos 1 - 1.000 Chuck's Angels 1 1 .500 Ducks 1 1 .500 Kindred Spirits 1 1 .500 Twins 1 2 .333 Royal A's 2 .000 Special Blend 2 .000 THIS WEEK'S GAMES 'h 1 1 1 l'h 2 2 (All •am• at Fonde Park. Take 1'""58outh to Telephone exit. Tab feeder to Mwtam'. risht on Munaer, 10 1 block, tum left.) Sunday, May 9 Renegades vs. Kindred Spirits, 2pm Chuck's Angele vs. Ducks, 3pm Special Blend vs. Hell Raisers, 4pm Armadillos vs. Royal A's, 5pm MSABowling LAST WEEK GAMES Monday, May 3 HIGH GAMES HIGH SERIES Steve McConaughy Don Housen 585 223 Harvey Baade 582 Butch Irish 221 Steve McConaughy Harvey Baade 218 582 STANDINGS Division A 1. Daddy's 2. Eurotan Int'l 3. Barnyard Hoers 4. 69era Division B 1. Buehwackers 2. Splitz Endz 3. Five Easy Pieces 4. E.G.S. Protein Supplements Division C Division D 1. Slow Hand 1. Galleon One 2. Cherry Pickers 2. Gator-Aid 3. Citizen Pain 3. Happy Trails 4. Strikers 4. Untouchables THIS WEEK'S GAMES (All ram• at Stedium Bowl. 8200 Bnoeomain) Monday, May JO Regular competition, 9pm Thursday, May 13 Regular competition, 9pm Pool Tournaments Monday, May JO Kindred Spirits (5245 Buffalo Speedway, Actually, Bobby and Fred play a never­ending game of king-of-the-mountain, with each one gaining top seed over the other with great frequency. However, with 7 singles and 4 doubles matches planned, there will be plenty of room for new players in the league to have an opportunity to play. Three or four reps may be heading out to San Francisco for Memorial Day weekend to participate in the "U. S. Openly Gay" National Tennis Tournament. Last year Fred Lopez was injured in the semi-finals of the National Tournament. According to MSA Tennis League presi­dent Rich Corder, Fred just might be one of the favorites to win it all this year. Said Corder, "He may very well bring it back to Houston." Travel expenses for tournaments can be a problem, so an altruistic supporter of Montrose tennis donated a ticket to San Francisco for one of the players. Most of the top players competed to win the ticket. Said Corder with a smile, "Fred beat everybody." Out of approximately 24 players, sev­eral participate in at least one other sport. Bobby Hopkins and Rich Corder both bowl on the top-ranked Galleon bowling team, and Fred Lopez is a catcher on the Montrose Mining Company softball team. Eddie Chavez also plays softball. Hopkins does not know too much about Fred Lopez' power on the softball field, but he has nothing but praise for the Lopez style on a tennis court. "When it comes to tennis, he (Fred) is a great athelete." Fred and Bobby both played tennis in college with Bobby playing on the Univer­sity of Houston team for four years. For three of those years, he was the number four player on the team. In 1975, the team was fourth in the NCAA. He is very glad to have the opportunity to continue to play tennis. Said Bobby, "After you get out of school and have to work for a living, there's no time to play tennis. It makes a big diffrence." • Volleyball action MSA Volleyball will be holding a tourna­ment August 14 at the Fonde Recreational Center, according to Marcus Lee. Texas teams and tri-state teams will be invited. Two of the top Montrose teams also play in USVBA sanctioned tournaments, the West End Stars and the Houston Hit. 665-9756) at 8pm, single elimination, $2 entry, winner take all. Mary' a (1022Westhe1mer, 528-8851) at9pm Ranch (6620'h Main, 529-9730) at9 pm, sin­gle elimination, $2 entry, winner take all ($50 guarantee) Tuesday, May 11 Lampost (2417 Times Blvd. 528-8921) at 8pm, single elimination, $2 ~ntry, winner take all Wednesday, May 12 Briar Patch (2294 W. Holcombe, 665-9678) at 9pm, single elimination, $2 entry, $50 prize Thursday, May 13 Barn (710 Pacific, 528-9427) at 9pm, double elimination, $2 entry, $25 first round prize, $15 second round prize Just Marion and Lynn's (817 Fairview, 528-9110) at 8pm. E/ J's (1213 Richmond, 527-9071) at 9:30pm, double elimination, $2 entry, winner take all. MSA Tennis (Couru located on the north 1ide of Memorial Drive in Memorial Park.) STANDINGS 1. Fred Lopez 9. Rick DuPont 2. Bobby Hopkins 10. Eddie Chavez 3. John Ryan 11. David Garza 4. Lester Vela 12. Randy J. 6. Jon Colbert 13. David 6. Rich Corder Robicheaux 7. Victor Godine 14. Daniel 8. Terry Rich Casillas The Stars won the A Division tourney Feb. 27 in Texas City while the Hit was successful in the B Division, placing third in their very first tournament over a pool of 18. There is still room for more people to play volleyball. Volleyball action is on Tuesday nights from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. at the corner of Dallas and Taft streets. Dues can be paid individually or by teams. • Tennis opportunities Rich Corder of MSA Tennis is making a special plea to women to join the league. "We wish women would join," said Corder. "We've had a few gay women play in the past and we wish more would come." Any new members who join can get on the ladder of seeded players. All the person has to do is challenge at any point of the ladder. If he/ she wins, the challenger takes over that spot and the challenged moves down a notch. .•..-.•.... If the challenger loses, he/ she starts out at the bottom. More information is availa­ble from Rich Corder at 524-2151. • Colorful Monday night bowling There is something about the game that brings out the off-beat in people during the Monday night MSA Bowling at Stadium Bowl. Perhaps it is the constant rumbling of the balls as they make their constant jour­neys to the pins, perhaps it is the adequate ventilation system that might confuse the minds of people more used to smokey rooms, perhaps it is the brightly lit build­ing that allows a person to see clearly the person with which he might be going home, perhaps it is the well-stocked bar. Of course, it may be that off-beat, witty people like to get together with other off­beat! witty people, and bowling offers a . .... HaPfL'+L~its Now playing Wed., Fri., Sat. &. Sun. BOB WILLIAMS & THE TRAIL RIDERS and every Thurs. &. Sun. THE DIXIE KINGS OPEN Noon-2am 7 days a week 715 FAIRVIEW 521-2792 Entertainment at the Top of the Hole with the Kampy Kapers of KEOKI KONA, Wednesday thru Sunday, 5pm-1 am. THE HOLE HOUSE 528-9066 109 Tuam MAY 7, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 good opportunity to be active and socialize at the same time. There are two nights of bowling and lots of teams and players, so an entire run­down of all the fun will probably take sev­eral months or at least be a life-time job. But to make a dent, here are some items. The B Division of MSA Monday Night Bowling includes teams named Damnifi­know, Lois Lanes, Five Easy Pieces, Split Endz, Holee Rollers, Pecker Power, and Bushwackers. The two top teams are currently the Bushwackers and the Split Endz. One week one will be on top, the next the other will-a friendly rivalry, if there ever was one. "That's the way it's been since it started," said Bruce Herling of the Split Endz. "Flip-flop. Back and forth." Paul Beunger (pronounced " Binger") of the Bushwackers loves the competition. "They're super. We enjoy bowling them." When asked what was going to happen when the two teams meet head on, John Marshall of the Bushwackers replied, "We're gonna win all four." John bowls under the name Diamond Lil and is know to some as "Di." "As in 'fall out and die, honey," according to John. John proceeded to roll off many humorous, colorful and unprintable bits of wit. In the final frame of the second game on last Monday, Paul looked at the scoresheet of a fairly close game and informed listen­ers, "We're gonna win this one." Then flashing a super-charming smile, he added, "I know. I'm up last." With a 195 average, Paul has reason for confidence. When the final frame was over, the Bushwackers had taken over first place in B Division and the Split Endz had moved to second. Stay tuned for more on this see­saw bowling battle. New in Town? Open a N.O.W . ACCOUNT The checking account that pays 51/4% Interest. No service Charge on SSOO balance.A Insured to $100,000 ov the FSLIC ~ Call or come by today. ~ - Mainland SavPfJJ SET SAIL FOR SAFETY WE'LL SHOW YOU THE WAY HOUSTON :5401 Allen PJ!'Xway 527 8446 FRIENDSWOOD 102 N FnendswOOCI Or 482-7553 HITCHCOCK 8500 H1gtlw1v 6 986-5547 BAYTOWN 1308 w Saker at Cartll 420 S69l Open a tax deductible speclallzlng In 18 month certificates Please call fOr current rates. A current rate \Ubltct to CNnQe ~ Subst int1a1 ~Nlf'YfOr Htly w•tt'°ni1111a· ~ ~urf'O uO tO SG:>OCICIOy~FSllC Mainland Sav~J SET SAIL FOR SAFETY WE'LL SHOW YOU THE WAY HOUSTON S401 Allen Parkway 527 -8446 FRIENDSWOOD 102N Fnendswooa Or 482·755] HITCHCOCK 8300 H19hw>v 6 986 5547 BAYTOWN 1508 w Baker at Gartn 420·5693 8 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 Happy Hour 7am-7pm Open Everyday at 7am Grant at Jackson 528-8234 OUR SPECIAL SALE FOR YOU OFFERS • 15% DISCOUNT off our everyday, low competitive prices. • THE QUALITY WORK that earned us the reputation as the community's quality printer and stationer. • FREE PICKUP AND DELIVERY Sale discount good for all our services, including stationery, envelopes, business cards, general printing, typesetting, carbonless business forms, color printing, Xerox 9400 processing. When you are getting price quotes, give us a call: 667-7417 Quality is the difference at SPEEDY PRINTING SERVICE BELLAmE STORE "The Community's Quality Printer & Stationer" MONTROSE TRAVEL WHERE ALL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS RENO RODEO All inclusive tour-$399 (Hurry! Only a Few Seats Left!) San Antonio Weekend May 15-$66 Memorial Day in Dalla s-$140 · Luxury Private Island in Gulf of Mexico-$359 2506 RALPH-522-8747 Watering Hole j Tuesday: Steak n_ight '\: Wednesd~: Country & Western Night, LIVE BAND~ ¥ Thursday: Pool Tournament 9:30pn Morning Happy Hour 7am-noon Evening Happy Hour 4-7:30pm 1213 RICHMOND• 527-9071 Extra parking on the comer Mt. Vernon & Richmond The Blue Iris a complete flower shop Remember Mother's Day Singapore Orchids Lilies Plants Gifts Total City Delivery We wire flowers worldwide 523-1827 3618 S. Shepherd Dr. Houston, Texas 77098 MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Montrose Art Robert Gordy at the Contemporary Arts Museum mouths. There is, to paraphrase Ms. Tok­las, no there, there. By Ed Martinez From now through June 6 the Houston Contemporary Arts Museum is hosting a show featuring approximately 90 draw­ings and paintings of noted New Orleans artist Robert Gordy. A fairly well-known artist just recently starting to gain national recognition, Gordy was born in New Iberia, Louisiana, and has worked in New Orleans for many years, with a few interruptions for work and study in New York in the 50s. Gordy has gathered numerous awards and last year won the Beaubourg Founda­tion Award, given to an American for study in Paris, sponsored by the Centre Pompidou. Robert Gordy is one of those unfortu­nate examples of modern art that seem to partake of several schools of art and prove conclusively that the whole is pitifully smaller than the sum of its parts. Not really abstract, not surely impressionist, Gordy sets out to define his canvasses with repeated motifs of designs that seem like step-and-repeat patterns on a bolt of cloth, all too often. Gordy has stated quite boldly that pat­terning is one way to get from one side of the canvas to the other. What a great pity that the thrillingly creative urge that results in some of the wonderful art of our time is reduced, for Gordy, to a process of getting from one side of the canvas to the other. While usually true that one should not listen to what an artist says about his own work, but rather consider the work itself, it BEDS BEDS BEDS Simmons Beauty Rest floor samples $600.00 King Set- 175.00 $400.00 Queen Set- 125.00 while supply lasts All sizes & frames available 2115 Norfolk 523-8278 is nevertheless often quite valuable to hear an artist describe his work to give some insight to how he sees it. Still, the works of Gordy speak of rather bland com­mercial art, useful in fabric design, but Ii ttle else. Neither sweeping landscapes, nor tor­tured abstracts, or even portaiture show us something, however allegorically, about the human condition appears in these canvases. One is drawn to a painting of a face, and what one sees is a Vogue-like mannequin with a wide slash of red for a mouth, and a vapid, empty expression on a femal~ face. I cannot help but be reminded of the faces on the stained glass windows in Chagall's chapel, merely curved lines with dots and dashes to indicate eyes and Basically what I am saying is that Gor­dy's work lacks substance. The great pity of our age may well be that it lacks fibre, guts, substance, moral integrity- call it what you will. The art of our time cannot but reflect that great truth. One becomes so inured to admiring and saying polite nothings about the great sea of nothing that mirrors this Jack until finally an artist comes along about whom so many strive so hard to find something to say that it is glaringly evident that nothing can be said because there is nothing there about which to speak. Enough! This is simply mediocre art, and since Gordy has a well-established reputation he will obviously hardly note nor long remember what I may say here, so I say it with impunity. GRAND OPENING SALE MAY 14-24 25% OFF ON ENTIRE ASSORTMENT OF MERCHANDISE EXOTIC PLANTS ROSES CUT FLOWERS BOUQUETS FANCY PLANTS G IFTS T ELEPHONE ORDERS: 529-6050 812 WEST HEIMER THE C LEMONS GALLERY IS PLEASED TO BRING TO HOUSTON FOR THE FIRST TIME AN EXHIBITION OF THE COLOR WORKS OF ONE O F AMERICA'S MOST HONORED AND DISTING U ISHED PHOTO­GRAPHERS, H ARRY C ALLAHAN THE EXHIBITION CONTINUES THROUGH JUNE 5 THE CLEMONS GALLERY 803 MARSHALL, HOUSTON 77006 520.5353 GALLERY HOURS 10AM-5 PM T UESDAY· S ATURDAY ATCO Pest Control • Roaches • Beetles • Ants • Moths • Fleas • Rats •Ticks •Mice SAFE, EFFECTIVE, INEXPENSIVE INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL CUAN OUT AND FOG $30.00 988-1331 10 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 TBI BARN ,A.._ , \, I.. ,! Q;ll ' 1 \ l ' 4 . . Houston's Friendliest Country & Western Bar SUNDAY: Buffet for the MDA*. KON-SAT: Open 7am. lCO:NDAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. Also SPECIAL MDA * POOL TOURNEY. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDlraSDAY: White Light'n Night. TmmSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. , 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Sunday Night: Bartenders' Show at the Lazy '\ J with Ron Sioux, M.C. Tuesday Night: Ron Sioux performs at the ' Brazos River Bottom •Mueeular Dystrophy Association TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN INCHES? Star Pizza will deliver hot and iuicy to your door Come Dlay in our new upstairs -J A *v ideo game room a::~j_.1~-- OVEN HOT DELIVERY .r * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOMS 4, ii: *New York-Style hand-thrown ~ <;l pizza we * Chicago-style deep-dish pizza ~ * Also available with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian pizza 2111 NORFOLK * Starburst deluxe pizza (the worksl) HOURS: * Super sandwiches & salads Mon: 11:30am-11pm d Tue: sorry, closed * Fantastic e1erts Wed: 11:30am-11pm * Imported & domestic beer Thu: 11:30am-11pm CALL 523-0SOO Fri: 11:30am-mldnlght Sat: •pm-midnight PLEASE ALLOW ONE HOUR FOR Sun: •pm·10:30pm DELIVERY cc reservations neceHary 2702 Kirby 524-6272 MONTGOMERY, MAYES & STRITCH TRIO appearing May 11-15 (Linda Petty & Pavillion through May 8) serving Lunch Monday-Friday 11:30-2:00 Dinner Monday-Thursday 6:30-11:00, Friday 8r Saturday 6:30-12:00 Harrer Ethiopian Cuisinr A touch of Elegance, Intimacy and Fine Ethiopian Food 428 Westheimer 526-2895 Featuring Harrar's Club Dancing 10 to 2, Mixed Music ~~I~~ There's never a dull moment Neighborhood MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Small house brimming with big possibilities P hotostory by Ed Martinez Montrose is filled with homes and apartments that were once obviously quite humble abodes but are now gracious and charming residences. One cannot but wonder what some of them must have looked like before the work was done that rendered them such interesting dwellings. An opportunity to see for oneself is readily available at 2021 Elmen in Montrose, a few blocks north of Fariview and just east of Shepherd. With homes and properties in Montrose going for outrageous prices, the chance to find a steal and remodel it to provide a home worth many times the purchase price is practically nil these days. The next best opportunity is to find a house like our candidate on Elmen and use imagination and good taste rather than lots of money to achieve the same end. The property at 2021 Elmen is chock ful of possibilities as it stands. The house is painted what can only charitably be called an unfortunate color. It has shade trees front and back, and features a nearly-new board fence enclosing the back yard. Spacious wooden decks fore and aft provide limitless vistas for creative use of this open space that enhances and enlarges the area within the house. An unusual solarium greets the visitor as he leaves the front deck of the house, serving as a foyer. The house has three bedrooms and one bath, and the floors, ceilings and walls are all in good condition. The judicious use of paint on the exterior to emphasize the window and door frames would immediately give the home greater distinction and individuality. From there, artful touches within the home would soon offer an outstanding living space that would provide all the obvious advantages of intown, Montrose SPECIAL FRIDAY RUSH HOUR 5-6PM 504 BAR DRINKS 2303 Richmond 522-7616 living. The asking price is $113,000 for the property, listed with Clardy & Co. This property is a vivid example of a soundly constructed home that has survived all the vagaries of time and fashion and is just waiting to be recycled into stylish, affordable living quarters for the 80s. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 \. ... - 11 11 SUPERB OFFICE SPACE At 3317 MONTROSE at Hawthorne Small offices & large suites available, short term and long term leases, remodeled to suit tenant Call Tim Crockett 626-8880 - • • • • __ -~------"~-~~-~~-----rliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii__ ~ Briar Patch · 1194 W. Holcome 665-9678 HAPPY HOUR: 12-8 every day Spahgetti-Tuesday, 7pm Pool Tournament-Wednesday, 9pm Buffet-Sunday. 4pm SPECIAL DRAWING $1 per ticket Register at the club Prize: 1 days in Galveston at Hotel Galvez, Free Champagne, Brunch both days. plus $100 Cash Re01e01ber Mom Sunday with Richard Allen Florist • Open 7 days a week • Flora Fax wire service • All major credit cards 1848 Westheimer 526-7795 MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Ritchie Family: High energy entertainers By Nick Fede The striking trio of songtresses who are the Ritchie Family offered an hour filled with well-executed choreography, searing sensuality and exciting vocals in their pre­mier Texas appearance at Numbers 2 on May2. Following a brief introduction, the group burst onto the Numbers stage and launched into their first number, "It's a Man's World." The performers were lit throughout the show in hot pink and ripe cherry colored spotlights. The audience reacted with some whis­tles of approval as the group sang their next song, "Where Are the Men?" while dancing dervishly and offering their hands outstretched in frustrated supplica­tion to the crowd. Some moments of comic releif came when the group sang "Give Me a Break." The song's lyrics deal with the frustration of an educated woman who cannot seem to land a job. Lead singer Vera Brown fluffed the opening lyrics, and Jacqui Smith-Lee looked as if she literally could have used a break from the strenuous movement required in the number. During the song, the group had a spoken interlude in which all three women listed their many educational achievements which were not being utilized by employ­ers because of sexual discrimination. "What are we?" they asked themselves and the crowd. The hilarious simultane­ous reply from both the performers and the audience was "Women!" The crowd registered some surprise when the group performed the song "Be My One and Only." The song is not disco, but rather a blend of soul with an upbeat pop flavor. The reception after the intial shock wore off was one of enthusiasm, however. "The group is not performing strictly disco music anymore,'' said Jacqui Smith­Lee in an interview backstage. The group has accomplished their expansion into soul and pop with the release of their sixth album, I'll Do My Best on the RCA label. Their performance featured four selec­tions from the new album in addition to some of their old disco hits. "We would now like to be known as an all-around female entertainment group," explained Vera Brown during the post-show interview. The Ritchie Family has changed. But this is not the first time that such a change as occured. Three former members of t~e group departed in 1977. The present Rit­chie Family features the ~ead v~ls of Vera Brown, with Theodosia (Dodie) Dra­her and Jacqui Smith-Lee. The name of the group was created by a collaboration between Ritchie Rome and Jacques Morali when both produced the Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose (fo~riday, May7, throuah Thur.day, May 13) •PIANO Linda Petty and Pavillion 9pm nightly (except Sunday and Monday) at RallCllla, 2702 Kirby, 524- 6272. Tom Williama 6pm Friday and 8:30pm Sunday and Tuesday-Thursday; Bill Hudson 8:30pm Fri­day and Saturday; Mr. Roxie Starr and Mickey Rankin !pm Saturday and Sunday and 8:30pm Monday; Jim Cater 4:30pm Saturday and Sunday; ar.d Marquerite 5pm Monday-Thursday at Key­board, 3012 Milam, 528-6988. Donna Corley 9pm nightly (except Sunday and Monday); Terry Meason 9pm Sunday and Mon­day at Baja' a, 402 Lovett, 527-9866. Theresa Mauney 5pm daily (except Saturday and Sunday), and Lee LaForire 8:30pm nioghtly (except Sunday) at Arno's, 4002 Montrose, 528- 2993. Marquerite 8:30pm Monday through Saturday and I lam Sunday atBacchus,523Lovett, 523-3396. •DISCO song "Brazil." The song was recorded by a group of independent studio musicians. Upon completion, the first name of co­producer Rome was chosen as the group banner for the release of the hit single. Just how did these three talented women become the present Ritchie Family? "Jacques (Morali) sent for me with the help of some musicians who knew me," said Brown, who was working then as a medical secretary. Draher was singing with a Canadian group called Rich Jensen and the Music Corporation. Smith-Lee had graduated from the New York High School of Performing Arts and •GUITAR "L" 9pm Friday and Irish Folk 9pm Wednesday at the Parlour, 2402 Mandell, 529-8069. Angela Clemmons Sunday evening at Numbers 2, 300 Westheimer, 526-6551. •ORGAN Keokl Kona 5pm Friday and Satunlay, 3pm Sun­day and 5pm Wednettday and Thursday at the Hole, 109 Tuam, 528-9066. •COUNTRY & COUNTRY/ROCK Band-to-be-announced Wednesday evening at E/ J's, 1213 Richmond, 527-9071. Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9:30pm Friday and Sat­urday and 8:30pm Thursday at the ExHe, JOI! Bell, 659-0463; and 8:30pm Sunday at Brazos River Bot­tom, 2400 Brazos, 528-9192; Flyln& Blind Band nightly (except Monday and Tuesday) at Miss Charlotte's, 911 Drew, 528-8840. Terry Ann Melton & the Te:icas Home Grown Band 7pm Sund&y at Gay Boy International (G.B.I.), 1419 Richmond, 528-8903. Mustan& Band 9:30pm Friday, Satunlay, Wednes­day and Thursday at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazoe, 528-9192; and Sunday e.ftemoon at The Deep, 2212 Converse, 521-3751 had danced with the Dance Theater of Harlem and the Alvin Ailey Dance Ensemble. "I read about the auditions in Back­street (a music industry publication)" Smith-Lee said. "I also had been given a jump on the others applying before the auditions by Village People member Bran­don Jones. He had heard that the members of the Ritchie Family were plan­ning to leave." When Draher was asked how she ener­getically performs the deft movements involved in the choreography of the group's shows, she replied jokingly, "With lots of prayers." She also admitted, "I talk Austin Mann 7:30pm Friday and Saturday at Ban­nister Restaurant, 1322 Weatheimer,. 526-0355. Nancy Ford 5pm Friday; Lyra/Kat Graham & Linda Aum Rhyme 5pm Monday, Tuesday and Thursday; and Rawelyn Ruffin 5pm Wednesday at Kindred Spirits, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 665- 9756. • SHOW GROUPS Dixie Kings 4pm Saturday and 2pm Sunday at Happy Trails, 716 Fairview, 521-2792. Mata Hari 9pm Friday and Saturday at Lampo6t, 2417 Times Blvd., 628-8921. John Day & Co. 8pm Sunday at E/ J's, 1213 Rich­mond, 527-9071. • ROCK&ROLL Automatic 2pm Sunday at Grant Street Station, 9ll Fairview, 528-8342. •NEW WAVE The ProfeHlonals Monday night at Numbers 2, 300 Westheimer, 526-6551. •JAZZ Robert Ceballos Group 9pm Sunday and with Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday, Satunlay, Wednesday and Thursday at Laa Brisaa, 614 W. Gray, 528-9959. Montrose Live to my legs." Explaining about her excellent rapport with crowds, she said, "I feel like I'm actu­ally theirs, and that I belong to them for that period of time." The group has just finished a benefit for Karposi's Sarcoma research at Noew York's Paradise Garage. An estimated crowd of 3000 gay men and women were in attendance. The group's next appearance will be in New York at Studio 54, which will be fol­lowed by a European and a United States tour. "We are looking forward to being out on a tour," said Brown. "We haven't had a hit song in a while." Kirk Whalum nightly (except Sunday) at Cody's, 3400 Montrooe, 522-9747. Rumore 9:30pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon­day); and Mickey Mosley Band 9:30pu:i Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchers, 907Weetheimer, 527- 0595. • IMPRESSIONISTS Tiffany Jones Donna Day, Naomi Sims & Hot Chocolate Sunday evening atthe Copa, 2631 Rich­mond, 528-2259. Little Bobby, Jerry Harper, Tracey and guest Sunday evening at Exile, !Oll Bell, 659-0453. ''Playgirl Follies" with Laura Lee Love, Lana Kane, Eydie Mae and guest 10:30pm Saturday at Pink Elephant, 1218 Leeland, 659-0040. • MISCELLANEOUS Ron Soui.x and bartenders show Sunday night at La2y J, 312 Tuam, 528-9343; Ron Sioux Tuesday night at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos, 528- 9192. Talent showo Tuesday evening at the Copa, 2631 Richmond, 528-2259; Wednesday evening at Mid­nite Sun, 534 Westheimar, 526-7519; and Thursday evening at Twine, 635 w .. theimer, 520-0244. 14 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 Texas Playwrights Festival offers 'The Gin Game' and 'Windmills' By Billie Duncan Stages, 709 Franklin has taken on the presentation of an entire slate of plays written by Texans, some the offerings being written expressly for the current Stages Texas Playwrights Festival. The first two provide a wide range in both style and quality of production. The Gin Game is a known quantity, having already established itself with a Pulitzer Prize and a successful Broadway presen­tation starring Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn. Windmills in its world premiere is not likely to distinguish itself in any way in its present state. In The Gin Game by D. L. Coburn, two old people in a nursing home meet and learn the truth about themselves as they try to manipulate one another for one rea­son or another over a couple of weeks, with . the playing of gin as a pivot for confron­taion and revelation. Weller Martin, the crusty, foul-mouthed, cigar-smoking would-be philosopher of the sundown set sees the newcomer to the home, Fonsia Dorsey, as an easy mark to get to play gin with him. He cares little for the social implications of the match, want­ing instead to taste the sweetness of suc­cess, a flavor that has eluded him in his life. Fonsia, supposedly a neophyte at gin, turns out to be more of a game player than he bargined for. They present themselves, as humans tend to do, in the best possible light when they first meet. Weller presents himself as the secure retired businessman who has a handle on the truth about life. Fonsia pres­ents herself as the lovable self­relient, gently-spoken woman who would not want to burden her children with her care. As the play progresses, the veneers are stripped away, leaving pictures of very flawed human beings. 'Dorian' opens at Chocolate Bayou By Billie Duncan Chocolate Bayou Theater is currently pre­senting an experimental musical piece for a month-long run. The play is.Dorian,and it is a fascinating theatrical idea. The music by Errol Perlman is haunt­ingly beautiful in most parts with explo­sions of musical emotion at others. The lyrics run the gamut from philosophy to satire. And together, they provide some of the best reasons to see the show. Occasionally, however, certain songs do not fit the context of the scene. But, then, many scenes do not fit with their neigh­boring scenes either. MoSt people know the basic story of Dorian Grey-how he stays young while his portrait ages-so the plot is not as important in this play as the presentation of the plot. The one thing from which the show suffers the most is the inconsistency of the style. Director Tim Tavcar (who adapted the script from a work previously done in Chicago at Center Stage) has framed the show with the idea that the actors are really other actors who are presenting the story of Dorian Gray-a nice touch that might be used to re-structure the play into a more cohesive vehicle. As it is, the play is a somewhat jarring combination of broad strokes and draw­ing room tedium. The play is based on Oscar Wilde'sThe Picture of Dorian Gray, and Tavcar's adaptation goes back and uses much of the Wilde ideas that were in the novel for the new work. Oscar Wilde was a social commentator who shocked his contempraries at times with his off-the-wall approaches to life, love, and thought. So he is a perfect start­ing point for a take-off into the outrageous. Tavcar takes him too seriously. Jean Proctor and Charlie Trotter in scene from "The Gin Game." Photo by Greg Roach. In the Stages production, director Claire Hart-Palumbo has done two things well. She cast people capable of playing the roles and she paid attention to the rhythms of the action. A great deal of the play takes place with both actors sitting at a card table. Hart­Palumbo mercifully avoided trying to find excuses to get them up and moving around the stage. The movement that does occur Paul Polk in scene from "Dorian". Photo by Roger Gentry. Fortunately, there are parts of the play that embody the philosophy of Wilde with­out unnessesary reverence. And fortu­nately for the people who will go to see Dorian, the production is blessed with good staging and excellent singing and acting. The main structural problem of the play is that the elements of the play do not occur in the correct places. This is true both in the seperate episodes and in the overall story. Also, some characters who are vitally important to the action are underdeveloped, in particular Sibyl Vane and James Vane. The intermissions are in the wrong places, because, after the comedy efforts of Mrs. Vane, the moments of relief and repose are pretty well provided by the actual break or breaks in the presentation. The ten-member cast is wonderful both in their ensemble work and in their indi­vidual characters. Mark Albright as the diabolical Lord Henry provides an arrest­ing stage presence and a rich speaking is organic and motivated. The major problem for enjoying the pro­duction was a heavy railing that marked the perimeters of the room in which the two old people played their game. The set by J. B. Freemont looked good, but one whole section of the audience was rele­gated to straining to see the actors from chin up as they sat at the card table. Another set problem was the unatt-voice. He has a problem with a lack of specificity in his speeches made to the audience, however. Paul Polk in the title role is very good, but could present a stronger character if he allowed himself to age internally as the play progresses. He has a marvelous sing­ing voice. Gail Williams as the overbearing, gutter-minded Mrs. Vane and Roger Gen­try as a gimme-five, do-wa-diddy preist are kamp personified-and they do it so well. Kayce Glasse is an outstanding talent who plays Hetty Merton with style and grace and voice that does not quit. Marcy Mozola is delightful as Lady Henry and Ginny Lang is lovely in the role of the hauntingly beautiful Sibyl Vane. Floyd Nash plays the unfortunate por­trait painter with honesty, while Philip Hafer makes the most of a poorly written part as Sibyl Vane's revengeful brother. Richard Laub does what he can as Alan Campbell, the friend who must sacrifice his integrity because of the wretched, seeming blackmail of Dorian, in a scene that is too long and too late. After having sat through the show the audience was not given the opportunity to show appreciation for the performance of the actors. No-curtain-call endings may be appropriate for some plays, but in this case, it was for the birds. But with all its flaws, Dorian is still a fascinating piece of theatre. It will be interesting to see where the play goes from here. •Duncan's Quick Notes A Message to Real Women: Andy Mills 1s desperate for real women. He needs baton twirlers for the Montrose Symphonic Band and he thinks that females would be the right choice. Face it, most of the personel of the band and accompanying flag people and assorted marchers are male. If you have been griping about the lack of opportuni­ties for the female twirler in Montrose (or if ached doorway up center. Laughs should come from the acting and the ideas of the script, not from the inadequacies of the set construction. The acting, however, was very good. Charlie Trotter as Weller Martin gives an exciting performance that shows incredi­ble variety within the boundaries of his character. From being bombastic to appearing contrite, he is an absolute charm. J ean Procter does a lovely job as Fonsia, except that she seems to want her charac­ter to be nicer that she really is. The end­ing is not completely satisfying unless Fonsia grasps the truth about herself, and that truth is not terribly pleasant. The interaction between the two players is suberb. There is a magic going on that sparkles on that stage when they confront one another. That kind of magic is sadly lacking in Windmills by Jude Benton. The three related one-acts that are presented under the one title may not be perfect, but they would at least be acceptable if the produc­tion were not so poor. Director Rebecca Johansson has taken talented people and put them in roles for which they are unsuited, which makes them look bad and makes the audience uncomfortable. She further clouds the plays by con­stantly shifting the actors all over the stage for no reason whatsoever. And to top it off, she apparently has no sense of pac­ing or timing. It is difficult under the circumstances to fairly review the script itself, but one safe observation would be that the third play needs desperate re-writes. One saving point in the production is the wonderful hit-and-run performance of Pam Donahue as Conchita, the slow, silent, bad-tempered cook in the cafe segment. The Gin Game and Windmills will play at Stages through late June. you simply are a good twirler who would like to share your talents with the rest of the community), call Andy at 527-9669. Food for Musical Thought: Austin Mann has started to play for dinners at Bannister, and he can really aid a person's appitite. He not only looks good, but sounds wonderful. He plays guitar and sings a wide range of musical material. Last week, he started early because the VOICE had come by to hear him. Since there were no other custo­mers at that time (later the place filed to the brim), the entire kitchen staff came out to hear Austin. That really says something for a per­former when the owner, manager, waiters, busboys, and cooks stand around spell­bound to hear him play. Fete for Saudi Returnee: Jim Hil­drith just came back from four and a half years in Saudi Arabia, so the Keyboard threw a party with not only live entertain­ment, but a sit-down dinner that included prime rib, cold crab, boiled shrimp, assorted salads and deserts. The invited guests were served first, then the entire rest of the audience was asked to help themselves. They did. It was an incredible spread and a very gracious gesture on the part of the Keyboard. Hildrith was very pleased to be back. He said, "You have no idea how great it is to be in the U.S. So many Americans take so much for granted." He went on to say, "I've been all over the world and there's nothing that can com­pare to Houston." The Models: There are several groups that are causing new waves in Montrose. The Models are one of them and they play tonight at Omni on Westheimer. There is as much action on the musical fringe as on the fringe of one of Donna Day's best costumes, and you do not have to dye your hair bright blue to enjoy some of the most original music springing up in Montrose. MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 ------------------------, ·--------------------· SAVE YOUR MONEY BY USING THIS $10.00 COUPON* AT THE SHOE WAREHOUSE 523-6606 • 2024 WESTHEIMER (at Shepherd)I *Dingo, Levi, Con vene, Puma, Pony, Texas Boot. I Minimum purchase $50. I , _______________________ _ SAVE $2 ON A MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED After writing out your Classified Ad, compute the rate normally, then deduct $2 from the final cost and enclose this coupon with the difference. MERCHANTS: MONEY SAVING COUPONS IN THE VOICE ARE A WAY TO ATTRACT NEW CUSTOMERS. CALL YOUR VOICE ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE OR ADVERTISING DIRECTOR BILL MARBERRY TODAY AT 529-8490. Ul~t7-4·Ll~t7 M()!'lllill\1:1: ilill'lliill:i ilnalna Telear-ams? They'll never forget the gift or who sent it!!! Male and Female Bikini-Grams _ f-.. The Hulk • Dr. Feelgood Mad Momma Male and Female Bellygrams Playboy Bunnie Singing Bee Many More 521-0565 (THIS AD IS A $5.00 COUPON) Montrose Voice Clip 8 Use COUPONS Each week in the Voice, Montrose merchants provide valuable savings through coupons. Look for this page each week. Note: some coupons are valid this week only. Others can be saved for future use. I· -----------------------~ I I I I I I I I I I I MAY SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85-with this ad GYRO GYROS SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 : Open 11am-10prn everyday (till midnight Friday &: Saturday) I Imported Beer and Wines ~-----------------------· 16 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 Announcing ... Our next special booklet ... Mental Health in the Ga)' Comm unit)' Gay health officials from around the country, including those specialize in mental health, will convene in Houston June 5, hosted by the Montrose Counseling Center. The Montrose Voice, in conjunction with the convention, will publish a supplement that week on "Mental Health in the Gay Community." In addition to articles on mental health, the booklet will be used at the convention as a program. And we're going to also include a map in the booklet to help the expected hundreds of delegates with their social activities while in Houston. Advertising deadline is May 21. There will be 8000 copies of the booklet printed (7000 to be distributed along with the Montrose Voice and 1000 to be distributed to convention delegates.) The booklet will be released Thursday night, June 3. Reserve space now for your advertising message in this important publication. Call your Montrose Voice advertising representative, or advertis­ing director William Marberry, at 529-8490 today. The Montrose Voice-We're involved in the community Back by Popular Demand DEBBIE & THE FL YING BLIND BAND 5 Nights a Week Wed-Sat 9:30-1 :30 Sunday &pm-midnight • Sunday, May 9, 4-Bpm FREE BEER FREE BUFFET Live DJ direct from Belle Starr's in Kansas City 911 W. Drew Ask Yourself Where can you find over 18,000 discriminating shoppers whose unparalleled tastes drive them to nothing but the best? the readers of the Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE To advertise your business in the Montrose Voice, call 529-8490. Ask for William Marberry. Fisuree are u utimated by Montroee Voice reeearch. Come see what 5 Bucks will Buy!! Wednesday, May 12 7-9pm 1. 16 oz. T-bone steak (u cook), bake tater, salad, baked beans, bread 2. Two free well drinks 3. All the beer you can drink 4. "Kick-a-Boot" tp the Flying Blind Band On our all new Patio 528-8840 MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 GPC influence felt again at the voting booth From Larry Bagneris Jr. Preoident, Gay Political Caucuo Election returns indicate another highly successful political season for the Houston Gay Political Caucus. While voter tum-out was low throughout Harris County, the Montrose precincts had the third highest turnout in the county. This is especially meaningful in light of both the State Rep­resentative and State Senate race for the Montrose Area being unopposed within the primary. GPC endorsed candidates who have won their primary race include Mickey Leland (U.S. Rep. Dist. 18), Jim Hightower (Agri­culture Commissioner), Al Edwards (State Rep. Dist. 146), Volly Bastine (State Board of Education, Dist. 18), Murray Cohen (1st Court of Appeals), Geraldine Tennant (Judge 113th Judicial Dist.), Richard Moore (Judge, 228th Judicial Dist.), Sha­rolyn Wood (Judge 295th Judicial Dist.), Don Hendrix (Judge, County Criminal Court 2), and John Odam (Harris County Democratic Party Chair). All of these can­didates carried the Montrose precincts by large margins. In a surprise move, indicted incumbent Warren Harding, who trailed in a run-off situation with Ann Richards, recently held a press conference withdrawing from the race making Ann Richards the winner of the Democratic primary. GPC endorsed candidates who face fun­offs in the June 5th election include Mike Andrews, candidate for Congress in Dist. 25; John Hannah, candidate for State Attorney General; Gary Mauro, candidate for Land Commissioner; Larry Evans, candidate for State Rep. Dist. 147; Fru­mencio Reyes, candidate for State Rep. Dist. 148; Michael O'Brien, candidate for Judge 125th Judicial Dist.; and Steve Hen­ley, candidate for Democratic Executive Committee in Precinct 139. Those candidates endorsed by GPC who lost their primary election bid include Bob Armstrong, candidate for Governor; Wil­liam Kilgarlin, candidate for the State Supreme Court; Richard Cross, candidate for State Senate in Dist. 15; Steve Scha­fersman, candidate for State Board of Education in Dist. 25; Elinor Walters can­didate for Judge, 295th Dist. Court; Hugh Echols, candidate for Judge, 308th Family Court; and Gary Van Ooteghem, candi­date for County Treasurer. The GPC will be working hard for its endorsed candidates facing a run-off. A key factor in the caucus' strategy will be to increase the voter tum-out in the Montrose precincts. Any voter who voted on May 1 and any registered voter who did not vote May 1 is entitled to vote in the run-off. However, an individual who voted in the primary may not switch parties when returning to the polls on June 5. Volunteers wishing to assist GPC in the run-off election may get involved by call­ing 521-1000. The following percentages are based on returns from eleven Montrose precincts: Leland, 79%; Armstrong, 52%; Mauro, 57%; Hannah, 45%; Richards, 77%; Hightower, 84%; Kilgarlin, 76%; Bastine, 59%; Cohen, 71%; Tennant, 82%; O'Brien, 69%; Moore, 73%; Walters, 74%; Echols, 60%; Hendrix, 65%; Odam, 62%, Wood, 66% and Van Oote­ghem, 37%. Hill on Van Ooteghem From Ray Hill Houoton Human Right& League The Houston Police Department vice squad and the Harris County Prosecutor's Presenting L A M ( MATA HARi featuring MARYANNE MAHONEY (!V!!f Y Friday and Saturday , 9pm-1am. Unl1m1tcd Engag<!ment Sundays-Screwdrivers, Bloody Marys, $1 , 2-6pm Mondays-Free Buffet, Bpm Tuesdays-All-Women Pool Tournament, Bpm POST 2417 Times Blvd. 528-8921 Letters & Comments Office have been looking for prostitutes in Montrose again. Not to arrest, this time, but to testify against gay male porno flicks, so that some poor clerk can go to jail and the company can have less money to contribute to the cause. Only one prostitute could be found: Gary Van Ooteghem. I trust he can get enough money to pay off his considerable cam­paign debt from his new found friends and allies. They are more likely to do that than we are under the circumstances. Van Ooteghem on Van Ooteghem Next week, we hope, Mr. Van Ooteghem and friends of Gary, or both, will take this space to explain their side of the story. Stay tuned to the VOICE. Barnhart on Van Ooteghem From George F. Barnhart Manager, French Quarter Theater In a typically bold, daring and totally incomprehensible move, Gary Van Oote­ghem, former Gay Political Caucus presi­dent and former assistant County Treasurer has proven his outstanding and invincible courage in carrying out his commitment of dedicated and outstand­ing service to the gay community. As a part of his apparent newly created campaign to "upgrade" (?) the gay life­style, clean-up, sanctify and purify Mon- ** *GRANT STREET* * STATION * * 2377 Grant at Fairvie * A People Place 528-8342 * * * ** ********* PROFESSIONAL Hypnosis & Counseling Service Personal • Confidential James D. Kristian, Ph.D. REGISTERED HYPNOLOGIST IMPROVE: Sleep. confidence. self-worth. shyness. memory. concentra­tion. self-esteem . relaxation. habits. love emotion. OVERCOME: Fear. anxiety. guilt . depres­sion. nervousness. drug abuse.· alcohol abuse. anger. loneli­ness. weight. STUDENT AND SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977-2485 DISCOUNT FIRST VISIT DISCOUNT WITH AD 18 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 -"--' i:!l&\Vi:L IN THE MONTROSE 1620 COMMONWEALTH MON-FRI, 9AM-6PM, 523-2927 AT THE 5719 Kirby/Suite 20 Houston, TX 77005 522-8227 Windjammer Cruises Special Group Departures From $469 Call Rick for Details TOWER THEATRE IN CONCERT FEATURING SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1982/8:00 P.M. TICKETS $6.00 & $7.50 AVAILABLE AT THE TOWER THEATRE AND TICKETMASTER ANDY MILLS. CONDUCTOR r1 n1 -.I.\. trose, and to vigorously protect the citizens of the gay community agains the dreaded evils of the rights of free expres­sion, freedom of choice, and personal civil liberties in choosing their own lifestyle, Van Ooteghem has now achieved another victory in his attempt to destroy gay life­style businesses in Montrose and made great strides in cementing stronger and more abusive relations between the gay community and the Houston vice-squad. Van Ooteghem took the stand FOR the prosecution this Tuesday in a surprise move to refute the testimony of a twelve­member blue-ribbon panel of expert wit­nesses, which included prominent educators, journalists, business people, mental health professionals and public service leaders who were there to testify FOR the rights and lifestyles of gay indivi­duals!, and AGAINST the action of the vice-squad against the members of the French Quarter private club. In his testimony against the gay com­munity on Tuesday, Van Ooteghem expressed his personal repugnance of var­ious sexually related aspects of the gay lifestyle, particularly, it would seem, the right of the French Quarter private club to exist. The French Quarter is nationally noted for its private showings of full­length gay all-male cinema. In attacking the rights of gay citizens' self-determination as to their viewing hab­its, Gary made great strides in joining hands with Geneva Kirk Brooks, HPD Vice Department's Tommy Shane, HPD Sergenat Bill Brown, and the by-now fam­ous "Officer Jett" (who engineered and personally led the wave of bookstore and club arrests in February of this year, char­acterized by some as the "Siege of Mon­trose" because of the ferocity and large n umber of its selective enforcement actions in the area.) Celebrating our 1st anniversary of the fPfa!:l_~L'tf '3offie1'­hosted by Laura Lee Love, with Lana Kane & Eydie Mae Special Guests this week Jill Jordan, Jerisa & enter.t ainers from previous year' s Happy Hour Saturday midnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-8pm Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant Saturday & Sunday May8-9 & 15-16 1-5pm Mr. Roxie Starr Mickey Rankin COCKTAILS WITH ENTERTAINMENT, NO COVER Company ''8'' ARMY/NAVY SURPLUS FROM AROUND THE WORLD Maid and Janitorial Service Why pay good money for poor service when you can have quality at a reasonable cost. Including professional carpet cleaning. A $5 discount on 1st time cleanings. Free estimates given over the phone. Call 493-6341 and let us Mop it for \ You! ) The Moppets Cleaning Service MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 DINNER e BRUNCH 523 LOVETT 523-3396 lnvltadon to the . 198Z World's Fair From $175 per person, twin occupancy, May 1-0ct. 31 2 Nights/3 Days 3 Nights/4 Days FEATURES INCLUDE: • 2 or 3 nights accommodations including tax at The Palisades Condomini­ums. All units are fully furnished and include use of the complex's swimming pool, tennis courts, sauna and exercise room. • Economy size car rental for three 24-hour periods, unlimited mileage. (Tax and insurance are not included and are payable at the rental counter.) • Two days admission to the World's Fair For more information on this tour, and for airline tickets worldwide, call Bob Houston Travel Consultants Associated with Greenspoint Travel Center Phonfe a~c~~~~! J~ c?!:urs) All-Around Handyman Home Repairs Light Construction Mechanical Automotive Call Steve for Free Estimate 524-1947 20 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat MAY MAY 7 8 MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 9 10 11 12 13 For ad~tional in~ormation about events listed below, 10ok for the epc>ntoring orranization under "Organizations" m the Montroee Classified. Selected Events through 7 Days •FRIDAY: Full Moon, 6:46am •FRIDAY: Interact/Hous­ton's Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm-midnight, 3405 Mul­berry •FRIDAY: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin •SATURDAY: MSA's Soft­ball League games, Levy Field, off Richmond at East­side • SUNDAY: Mother's Day • SUNDAY: Family & Friends of Gays meets at MCCR, 1919 Decatur •SUNDAY: MSA's Softball League games, 6pm Levy Field, off Richmond at East­side •MONDAY: Montrose Sports Bowling League games 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Citizens for Human Equality board meet­ing •TUESDAY: Data Profes­sionals meeting •TUESDAY: Montrose Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory­Lincoln School, 1101 Taft •THURSDAY: Texas Gay Conference planning meeting, 7:30pm, 106 Avondale • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm­midnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks U N 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus meeting 7:30pm, 4600 Main, May 19 • IN 1 WEEK: Interact edu­cational forum 7:30pm, 3405 Mulberry, May 20 • IN 2 WEEKS: Montrose Symphonic Band concert at Tower Theater, 1201 West­heimer, May 22 UN 3 WEEKS: Gay Press Association convention in Denver, May 28-31 UN 3 WEEKS: 4th National Gay Invitational Volleyball Tournament in Denver, May 29-30 •IN 3 WEEKS: Memorial Day weekend "U.S. Openly Gay" National Tennis Tour­nament in San Francisco UN 3 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 31 • IN 4 WEEKS: National gay health workers conven­tion in Houston June 4-6 •IN 4 WEEKS: Democratic and Republican runoff elec­tions, June 5 •IN 4 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week 82 Committee meets at Kindred Spirits, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 2:30pm, June 6 •IN 5 WEEKS: Houston Gay Pride Week begins June 17, lasting through June 27 • IN 6 WEEKS: Father's Day, June 20 • IN 6 WEEKS: Summer begins, June 21 • IN 6 WEEKS: 6th annual San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festi­val opens June 21, lasting through June 26 • IN 7 WEEKS: Texas Cup June 26 at Memorial Tennis Center • IN 7 WEEKS: Houston Gay Pride Week parade and rally, June 27 • IN 8 WEEKS: Independ­ence Day, July 4 •IN 12 WEEKS: 7th Annual Reno Gay Rodeo, July 30- Aug. 1 • IN 14 WEEKS: MSA Vol­leyball tournament Aug. 14 at Fonde Recreational Center MUR PHY'S MANOR Montrose Classified BUSINESS OWNERS, Cl) W• !Uot f,.. each week in this directory (a) business eetabli•h· menta aerving aa di•tribution poinu for the newspaper, (b) current di1play advertiaen, (c) aJI HoU8t.on gay ban & private clubl (for th~ benefit of out-of·town Vlliton) and (d) non· profit community organization•. •lnd.icatee Montrose Voice dJetributlon point.a CARS & BIKES VESPA MOTOR SCOOTERS Low mileage, luggage racks. Two 1980s, $1100 each. 524-1248 (PM), 520-3408 (day). DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES For personal attention when buy­ing or selling a home, call Robert Burlin, agent. Hanks & Hinton Inc., Realtors. 2901 West Loop South. Phone 871-8880. EMPLOYMENT PART-TIME POSITION available in men's clothing shop. BASIC BROTHERS, 1625 Richmond, 522-1626 POLICE OFFICERS WANTED Women and men. Good salary and benefits. Ages 19 to 35. Be a part of Houston's future. Cell (713) 222-5201 HPD for details, today. Attend MSA Softball games, each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 0 10¢ per regular word or 15t PER ALL CAP· ITAL WORD in 6-point type, ae ehown here. (If U8ing few words in thW size or if centering on a line, compute at 80c a line, usin1 maxi· mum 8 regular words or 5 AU.. CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) D 25¢ per regular word or 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 8-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, using maximum 6 regular words or 4 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) D 30e per regular word or 45e PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 8-point bold type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if cen tering on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) D 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if cen­tering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maxi­mum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) D 50~ per regular word or 75~ PER ALL CAPI­TAL WORD in 10-point bold type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, com­pute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regu-lar words or 3 ALL CAP­ITAL WORDS to a line.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 10 point). Simply compute each word individually. BUT you may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per classified ad, BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 weeks in a row and deduct 15%. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of paper. Include your name, address and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not bill. by Kurt Erichsen There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice GAY BARS (A) Houston Tavern Guild member indication, placed in this directory at their request •BAJA'S-402 Lovett-627-9866: with res­taurant, live entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue "Neighborhood," a new fea­ture in the Voice-the newspaper of Montrose ;rsARN-710 Paclfic-~28-9427: country See our ad elsewhere this issue •BRAZOS RIVER BOTI'OM-2400 Brazoa- 628-9192: country •BRIAR PATCH-2294 W. Holcombe- 666-967S See our ad elsewhere this issue •CHASES-1416 Richmond-52()..1646: dieco • CHICKEN COOP-535 Weetheimer-526- 2240 •COPA-2631 Richmond-528·2259: disco with 1how1 COVE-2912 S. Shepherd-524-0170 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice •THE OEEP-2212 Converse-621-3761 See our ad elsewhere this issue •DIFFERENT DRUM-1732 Weetheimer- 528-8528: leather •>DIRTY SALLY'S-220 Avondale-529·7525 •E/J'e-1213 Rtcbmond-627-9<t71 See our ad elsewhere this issue •>EXILE-1011 Bell-659-0453' country The Voice has more Mon­trose readers, more Mon­trose news, more Montrose advertising oGALLEON-2303 Rkhmond-622-7616 See our ad elsewhere this issue •GAY BOY INTERNATIONAL(G.BJ.)-1419 Richmond-528-8903 •GRANT STREET STATION-91 I Fairview-~28-8342 See our ad elsewhere this issue •HOLE HOUSE-!09 Tuam-628-9066 See our ad elsewhere this issue •.i. Ii:'i-sos Paclnc-621-2619 See our ad elsewhere this issue •JUST MARION & LYNN'S-817 Fairview 6~9110: l•bian 0KEYBOA°"R'"'o=---s~o~1~2~M~1~·1-am---6~2'"s'~-6~9~8~S: with piano entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue Gary Larson's cartoons­exclusively in Houston in the Voice • KINDRED SPIRITS-5245 Buffalo Speedway---665-9756: predominantly 1eebian • LAMPOST-2417 Times Blvd.-62S- 8921 • lesbian See our ad elsewhere this issue • LAZY J-312 Tuam-528·9343 •LOADING DOCK-1735 Westheimer-520· 1818: leather disco •>MARY'S-1022 Weothelmer-62S-8861 See our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-each week in the Montrose Voice •>.MIONITE SUN-534 We.thefmer-526· 7519: dieco, 1how1 •MISS CHARUYM'E'S-911 W. Orew­lS28~ 8840 : country See our ad elsewhere this issue •MONTROSE MINING CO.-ll05 Pacific- 529-74118 •NUMiiERS2=°300Weethelmer-~2e-: 66lSJ: di8CO See our ad elsewhere this issue •PINK ELEPHANT-I21S Leeland-669- 0040. with 1how1 See our ad elsewhere this issue • RANCH-662o11l Main-528-8730 eRASCALS-2702 Kirby-624-6272 with re.taurant, live entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice •ROCKY"S-3416 w. -Dallae--ifai89F:IN. bi an •TWTNS--5..15 Weetheimer-52().()244: letbian dieco • VENTURE:N-2923 Maln-622-0000 ORGANIZATIONS A CAPEILA Chorua: part of (Montrooe) Chun:h of Chri1t ACLU-1236 W. Gray-524-6925 AMERlCAN LEATHERMEN (eocial club)-­meetl at Different Orum, 1732 Westheimer- 5:is.8528: club night Wed. Attend MSA Softball games, each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside ASTRO Rainbow Alliance-5244793 (voice & ITY) BERING Memorial Methodi1t Church-1440 Hawthom~26-1017: United Methodiatwor· 1hip eervice 10:50am Sun. BETWEEN TWO Worlda--029-1913: meeta every other Thun. BLACK & WHITE MEN Together (BWMT)-- 529-5006, 747·9812 (Montrooe) CHURCH OF CHRIST--020-K Wettheimer-777-9286: wonhip eervicea 12:30pm Sun. CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FAITH-413 Weatheimer-529-8005: worship eervicea Sun. :~d;i"?Jo~ lv~~~ !e~:S;'~h~~~;ra~~~ Wed. evenin1 "Neighborhood," a new fea­ture in the Voice-the newspaper of Montrose filJ~~ l.~~n 1J,V~1~~~~Jrl meetin1 second Tue&days COLT 45'S (aocial club)--meeta at Brazoo River Bottom, 2400 Brazoo-528-9192 COMMUNITY COFFEEHOUSE-project of Interact CONG. BETH CHAIM-meeta at MCCR, 1919 Decatur-5294876, 524-5180: eervice & aocial 8pm eecond & fourth Fridays CONROE AREA Gay Women-756-0354 COURT OF THE SINGLE STAR-meeta at Pink Elephant, 1218 Leeland-659-0040 CRISIS HOTLINE-228-1505 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice DATA PROFESSIONALS-meet• at La Quinta Motor Inn, 4015 Southwest Fwy.-522- 7H09, 523-6922: meeting leCOnd Tul!lllday• DIANA FOUNDATION-2700 Maoon-524· 5791 DIGNITY-meet.I at Catholic Student Center, 1703 &l.over-628·7644: meeting• 7pm Satur· day1 EPISCOPAL INTEGRITY /Houston-meeta at Autry Houae, 6265 Main-526-0555: meeting 7:30pm 1econd Tueeday1 The Voice has more Mon­trose readers, more Mon­trose news, more Montrose advertising - FAMILY & FRIENDS of Gay1-meeta at MCCR, 1919 Decatur-664-6339: meeta a«ond Sunday• FIRST UNITARIAN Chun:h-5210 Fannin 526-1571: worahio .ervi~ 11 ·lful"' q11n GREENSPOINT/FM1960 Ar .. Far-Away Frienda-821·9681 GAY & ALIVE Sbarin1 Experience (GASE)- 528-1311, 528-0891 Gary Larson's cartoons­exclusively in Houston in the Voice GAY ARCHIVESofTexae: project of Interact ~ ATHEISTS League of America-524· GAY HISPANIC CAUCUS-2722 Newman #12-621-0037: meet. 3rd Thunclay1. GAY ITALIAN Group-626-9844 GAY NURSES & PHYSICIANS of Houaton­c/ o GPC, 4600 Main #217-777·2287 GAY PEOPLE in Medicine--022·7360 GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPC)--4600 Main #217-521-1000: general butineu meet.­in& 7:30pm firat WednNdaya; educational forum 7:30pm third Wedneaday1 Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-each week in the Montrose Voice GAY PRIDE WEEK 82 Committee-meeta at Kindred S~irita, 5245 Buffalo Speedway-784- 8699: meetmg 2:30pm June 6 GA¥ SWITCHBOARD-529-3211 HEPATITUS HOTLINE-.Jim or David at 777-2287: a project of GPC'1 Medical Commit­tee HOME COALITION-1409 Oakdale-521- 0196 HOMOPHILE INTERFAITH Alliance-729 Manor-523-0969 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice Houaton Area GAY & LESBIAN ENGi· NEE RS & Scientiata-526-7386: meei. 7pm 4th Wedneeday1 HOUSTON COMMUNITY CLOWNS-&>2- 8314 HOUSTON HUMAN RlGHTS LEAGUE- 523-0969 HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB-c/o Mary'•, 1022 Weetheimer-528-8851 HOUSTON TA VERN---,G"'U"'l"'L"'D,-: -m-e-m""b_e_ra kt~~~:. ~i~~~~d~u~~~~rc,:Slly'•, Exile, •INTERACT/Hou1ton (l/H lnc.)-3405 Mulberry-529·7014, 694·1732: Community ~~:r~:~:et?~,=Jo;:n!!~h~~a~:c:~~~ ied location1); e1'ucational forum 7:30pm third Thuredaye •KPFT Radio, FM·90-419 Lovett Blvd.-526- 4000: Wilde 'n Sttfo gay radio 1how IOpm­midniaht Thurtr. LAMBDA ALANON-meeta at let Unitarian Chun:h, 5210 Fannin--021·9772: meeting Fri. evenine "He's being kept ... but at a distance." LESBIANS & GAY PEOPLE in Medicine- 665476<r. meeting 7:30pm finot Saturday• LUTHERANS CONCERNED-meet• at Grace Lutheran Chun:h, 2515 Waugh--021· 0863, 453-1143: meeting eecond & fourth Tuee. evenings METROPOLITAN Community Chun:h of the Resurrection (MCCR)-1919 Oecatur-861- e!!; ~;;15:! ~07:~5~~~n~t·~:i5~.!iw:r membership inquirera clue 7:30pm Mon.; AJanon meeting 8pm Mon.; Alcoholics Ano­nymoue meetine 8pm Mon. & Thure. "Neighborhood," a new fea­ture in the Voice-the newspaper of Montrose MONTROSE CIVIC Club (Neartown)--meei. ::!ti:~~~~~~!:t4i? ~e~~i:e-522-1000: MONTROSE CLINIC-104 Weotheimer--028- 5531: open 6-lOpm Fri., l..Spm Sun., 6-lOpm Tuea.&Thun. MONTROSE COUNSELING Center-900 Lovett # 102-5~7: National eay health worken convention in Hou.tton June 4-6 MONTROSE PATROL--021> Weatheimer- 528-2273 MONTROSE SINGERS-moeta at MCCR, 1919 Decatur--028-0550 MONTROSE SPORTS ASSOCIATION (MSA)--622-3304 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice Montroae Sports SOFTBALL--023-8802 day1, 523-0413 evee: season play April 17.July 18; playoffs July 24-Aug. 1 Montrose Sports WOMEN'S SOFTBALL- 728-9371 Montrooe Sports TENNIS-524·2151: Texao Cup June 26 at Memorial Tennia Center; "U.S. ~n~~d.:,NM=~a'fe8:~• J:ekr;1:dment in Montrooe Sports VOLLEYBALL--aso.2930: games 7:30pm Tuee., Greaory-Li.ncoln echool, 1101 Taft; tournament Aug. 14 at Fonde Recreational Center MONTROSE SYMPHONIC band-meei. at Bering Church, 1440 Hawthome-527-9669: TC:~~~7~r~l~leevje~th=e~pm May 22 ' MUSfANGS (aocial club)--meeta at the Barn, 710 Pacific--028-9427; club night Thuno. OPERATION DOCUMENTATION: project of GPC RICE Univ. Gay/Leebian Support Group-524-0724 TEXAS BAY AREA Gay•-332-3737· meeting Thura. evening The Voice has more Mon­trose readers, m ore Mon· trose news, more Montrose advertising MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 A Disturbed Peace To flaunt or not to flaunt ©1982 Brian McNaught How many times has it happened? The young office worker finally gets tired of lying to his fellow employees. For four years he has avoided talking about his social life. He has changed the pronouns from masculine to feminine when discussing his weekend friends. He has either faked illness at the time of the holiday staff party or brought his friend Marie. You know, the one with the great personal­ity who laughs a lot. "I'm gay!" he decides to confide. "Well, you needn't {la.un.t it," he is scolded. "Your mother and I don't talk about what we do in bed," admon­ishes the father. "Why do you need to flaunt what you do?" "I am a liberal and I believe you people ought to have your civil rights," one radio listener recently called in to tell me, "but there is going to be a major backlash in this country if you homosexuals don't quit flaunting your lifestyle." I flaunt. You flaunt. He, she, it flaunts. We flaunt. You flaunt. They flaunt. It is a verb which means "to wave or flutter showily; to display or obtrude one8elf to public notice; to display ostentatiously or impu­dently" (Webster's Collegiate Dictionary). Is that what the young man in the office who finally decided to tell the truth was doing? Was he fluttering showily? How about the per­son who appears on a radio talk show? Is he or she displaying impudently? When I was a youngster, my friends and I had our way of blocking out people. We would cover our ears, close our eyes and say over and over again in a loud voice, "I ca-n-n-n't hear you. I can-n·n-n't hear you." Usually, the other person would soon give up, shut up land move on. Generally, that is what I see happening when I hear some non-gay people accuse us of flaunting. I see the hands going up over the ears, the eyes squeezing shut and the mouth moving rapidly, "I can-n-n't hear you homosexuals. Give up. Shut up. Move on." It is not that we are "obtruding" ourselves to public notice. It is merely that we are talking honestly about our feelings and our expe­riences. Perhaps because we have kept our secret for so long, some of us might tend to talk a lot about being gay. It's like seeing an old friend and trying to make up for lost time. Also, because we now feel positively about something we used to be ashamed of, many of us feel the need to sing about our new self-image. However, we live in a sex-negative society. That means, "Sex is dirty. Save it for someone you love." It means that sex should only be talked about with your confessor and written about with magic markers on bathroom walls. Because "sexual" is part of the name we are proclaiming as good; because we feel positively about sex in general, we are told to shut up or risk backlash. Also, we live in an era during which a multitude of social issue confront us for opinions and a.nswers. Nuclear war, abortion, drugs, divorce, hunger, women's ng~ts, black rights, balanced budget. "Enough, enough, enough," as Anita Bryant declared in Dade County. In other words, "Please, please, please don't now start talking about the homosexuals!" The word flaunt is a pretty powerful tool and generally effective in intimidating people. When gay people are accused of flaunting, we, like uppity blacks, are being warned to watch our boundaries. "Step back." More than once, I have allowed myself to feel guilty for talking too much about homosexuality. More than once, in hearing a non-gay person complain about the chatter being made by all of the people leaving the closet, I have self-consciously stepped back into place. The "Catch 22" which these non-gay people throw at us is that we are oppressed today because no one in the past talked about homosex­uality in a knowledgeable way. Ignorance has always been our enemy. Yet, now that we have the facts and the nerve to proclaim our good news, we are threatened with a withdrawal of support if we don't keep quiet. "Don't flaunt your lifestyle if you want our vote." There are two major ways of educating the public. The first is by disseminating the facts about homosexuality, such as-it is a natural sexual variation found in every species of mammal, every culture and at every time in history. These facts need to make their way into school textbooks and libraries, media presentations and sermons. There is no definition of flaunt which can be used to discourage the sharing of accurate information. The other means of educating the public is through our story telling. The most precious gift gay women and men have to offer the world is our story of growing up gay, fighting for survival and blooming into self-affirmed persons. Statistically, we know that non-gay people who have come to know gay people are much more likely to support gay civil rights. It needs to be said that there are times when some gay people seem to be fluttering showily and displaying impudently. There are times when the loud, hostile, obnoxious behavior of some gay people prompts me to employ the word flaunt. In those instances, I remember the advice of my friend who suggested that there are two reasons for calling attention to yourself: politics and low self-esteem. For those of us who fortunately feel good about ourselves, I suggest our calling is to spread the good news whenever it is possible and appropriate. Undaunted by the accusation of flaunting, I think we ought to educate the public to the best of our ability, look for those persons whose ears are uncovered and reply to the others, "We are not flaunting. We are celebrating." 22 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 7, 1982 (/, "Army ants!" "Sorry to bother you, Sylvia , but your Henry's over here ... and he's got my cat treed again." 'Y3UJ M/(J Gary Larson Volca no god of the Nerdesians " What? ... You mean NO ONE brought the buns?" TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTS Foundation-1519 Maryland-526-9139 TEXAS RIDEl!S-<:/o Mary'a, 1022 We8thei· mer-528-8851 UNITARIAN!UNIVERSALIST Gay Cau· cu1-c/o lit Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin- 520-9767, 528-5&42: meeting third Sun. after­noont WESLA YAN FElLOWSHIP--864.a899 Gary Larson's cartoons­exclusively in Houston in the Voice WESTHEIMER COLONY ARTS Aaaocia· tion-908 Weatheimer-521-0133: fall festvial Oct 16-17 Wreetlere: Meet, grapple, make friends. All 50 etotet, all ei;tea. Information and hot ear.fele ~:r\~z~~ l~l~~~~·u~:Jl:!~ Ji'!1ri~:·8tud:i Attend MSA Softball games, each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ~M~=TJ~i~e~331~~:n°~:M~l.~ili~ noor, Hou1ton, TX 77006. Editor reserve• right to adju1t wording on all advertising. Rate variee from lOe to 75c per word. See explana tion at beginning of the Classifieds. CORNISH REX KITI'ENS Sh ow q u ality-$300. Blue, w hite, black-smoke. 520-5577. INVESTORS WANTED. Need financing to help deaf man open his own business. Legally incorporated. Call after hours for info. 524-3535 or write: DESIGN GRAPHICS INC., PO Box 66973, suite 182, Houston, TX 77006 rs~=n~;~:r~~1~ti:! .:!8:!>~o~~~~ ALONE? NO LONGER! Our beau­tiful people (men or women) will accompany you while you enjoy Houston more. TexEscort. 751- 9000. Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-each week in the Montrose Voice ~~~i~;1~:i~i!e~~~~ '8~:1; fa0ru~:t =~= Send phone number to: Occupe.nt, POD 42445, Houaton, TX 77242 Going on a trip soon? Is there gay life in Belleview, Nebraska? Walla Walla, Washington? The Gay Switchboard of Houston will be glad to tell you about all of the hots­pots in these and other wild vaca· tion resorts such as Kalispell, Mon­tana and Wilcox, Arizona. The Gay Switchboard is open daily from 6pm to midnight. 529-3211. The BodyWorks massage. New location, new hours. Call 526-2470 evenings and weekends. Gift certif­icates available. FOR AN ATM~O~PS~H~E-R_E_o_hOCl·-.1-v-an-.e-ty-a-nd ~:?ri~~a.~i~! F~~~!~:tio3n~!1fR'G~~ !~ 747-9812. BODY MASSAGE. Your place or mine. Afternoon or evenings, Bruce, 521-2009 ------ You've tried the BARS, BATHS, BOOKSTORES and BEACHES. What resulted? Meaningless encounters, venereal disease and possibly a BUSTED HEAD­namely YOURS! Let HOUSTON'S ORIGINAL MATCHMAKERS lead you out of this SOCIAL SWAMP. Join LAMBDACOMP NOW under our pre-summer 12% discount LAMBDACOMP A PHOTO-COMPUTER MATCHING SERVICE 5-10 p.m. Monday through Friday. 1-4 p.m. Ssturday. (713) 721-5583 HUNG OVER? If you want to drink, that'• ~: ~="Ar!~~n: A:~~i:n~~:(t\)t'• o~i:e are now ~eetinc. Monday•, .f{m, Bro~• A: ~~~ G~u::~ur:::~· di.:=~~· ~=· Alanon .rroup (for friend•, lover1J. relativee oi' the alcoholic) mef'tl Monday1 at opm. Where? MCCR. 1919 Decatur. Come on by. MAY 7, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Got an opinion about a subject raised in the Voice? Write us. Letters to the Editor, Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose, #306, Houston, TX 77006. PRIVATE GAY CLUBS •BOX OFFICE-1625 Rlchmond-522- 1626: male. See our ad elsewhere this issue. •CLUB HOUSTON-220.5 Fannin--669-4998: male. Attend MSA Softball games, each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside •MlDToWNE SPA-3100 Fannln-522· 2379: maJe. See our ad elsewhere this issue. •2306 CLUB-2306 Geneoooe-523-6235: male. RESTAURANTS •BAJA'S-402 Lovett-527-9866 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •BANNISTER-1322 Weotheimer-626-0366 •BRASSERIE-515 W. Alabama-528-8744 eCHAPULTAPEC-813 Richmond 522· 2~ our ad elsewhere this issue. •DECATUR CAFE-708 W. Alabama 5~~r ad elsewhere this issue. •GREEKISLAND~am-5~ "Neighborhood," a new fea· ture in the Voice-the newspaper of Montrose -GYRO GYROS Sandwich Shop-1536 WHtheimer-G28-4656 . • See our ad elsewhere this issue. •HOUSE OF PIES-3112 Kirby-628-38l6 •JADE DRAGON-224 WNtheimer-526-2683 •MARCELO'S Ice Cream-1521 Weatheimer- 522-6994 o&'ERS-1303 Weothelmer-5~23 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •OMAR>s:-so8 Lovett-528-3569 •RAsCALS:-:ino2 Klrby-524;62_72 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •RAUL'S BRASS RUBBING 914 W. AJabama-629-0627 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice •SPUDtJ.iiKE-_.16\Veatheimer-5~ •STAii-i>1w.:::ffi l -Norto11<-523-0800 See our ad elsewhere this issue. .$TEAK 'N' EGG--4231 Montroae-528-11135 <TIM'S CoffMShoP-:.,1525 W•theimer-529- 2289 SERVICES Attorney at Law John P. Bamich, 528-5566, general practice. •FITNESS EXCHA.NOE litn ... c.nt.r-SS07 Richmond-024-9932 •HAIRCRAFT ONE hair care-2110 Lexi~n-526-5472 •HAIRCRAFI' TWO hair care-2011 S. Shep­herd-- 628-2260 The Voice has more Mon­trose readers, more Mon­trose news, more Montrose advertising •HOUSTON GUEST HOUSE lodeinr-106 Avondal&--620-9767 •ICENHOWER Beauty School-327 Weotheimer-620-7972 •KWIK·KALL Mail Boxeo-3317 Montrooe- 522-1896 •LIONEL Hair Dea~-J220 Yoakum-526- 4494 •MONTROSE Hair Deaign-4317 Montroee- 522-2822 Gary Larson's cartoons­exclusively in Houston in the Voice MOVING, HAULING. Movemasters, 521-3155. •PRIVATE POSTAL SYSTEMS mail boxe•- 1713 We.theimner-629-3020 •SALONDANIEL hair car&-1626 Cherry· hurot-520-9327 Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-each week in the Montrose Voice SPEEDY PRINTING· 5400 Bellaire B~-=:-~:l~lsewhere this issue. There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice TRAVEL TECH travel asency-5719 Klrby-522-8227 See our ad elsewhere this issue. UNITED Cab-1103 Anita-654-4040 SHOPS & STORES 6~AR Adult Newo-1407 Richmond M~~~1ls~6L1TTERS r•ft• 4325 •RICHARD AU.EN Floriat-1848 Weatheim­er- 626-7795 Attend MSA Softball games, each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside •ASYLUM Adult Bookatore-1201 Richmond •BALL PARK Adult Bookstore-1830 W. Ala· bama •BASIC BROTHERS clothing 162fi Richmond-522-1626 •THE BED HOUSE-2115 Norfolk-523· 8278 See our ad elsewhere this issue. "Neighborhood," a new fea­ture in the Voice-the newspaper of Montrose •BOOM TOWN BLOOMS Oowera-3210 S. Shepherd--626-8110 •BYllAN"S Environmental De1lp1 A Fine Furniahinti-608 Weatheimer-529· 8002 See our ad elsewhere this i86ue. •CONE DANCEWEAR-4704 Montrooe-522- 1673 •COMPANY B military wear 5366 Weitheimer-966-9763 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •DINER'S Adult New1 240 Weatheimer 528-8950 ~i~S.~:!:t9llw. 'lz~~~nl8gg Manhole •DOWNBEAT Recorde-2117 Richmond 523-8348 •DRAMATIKA gifta-3224 Yoakum 528· 5457 •FACETS gifta-1412 Weetheimer 523-1412 The Voice has more Mon­trose readers, more Mon· trose news, more Montrose advertising •FRAME OF REFERENCE paint 1533 Weatheimer-520-0710 •FRENCH QUARTER Adult Theater- 3201 LoW.iana-527-0782 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •FRIDA Y'S FtorUt-1338 We.theimer 52"- 6518 •INFINITE RECORDS-528 Weathoimer 521-0187 •JARDIN DE ST. FRANCIS-1016 Peden 529-7576 •KIRBY NawitaDd..,lll5,KirbJl-52Qil246 •LE BAOUL African Art Gallery-4317 Montrooe-521-3348 Gary Larson's cartoons­exclusively in Houston in the Voice •OH BOY! Leather Gooda-912 Weatheimer- 524-7859 •OPTIONS flowero-1503 Yale at 15th-868- 3830 PALACE ADULT BOOKSTORE 76371h LONGPOINT OPEN24HRS. VIDEO, FILM, NOVELTIES, ETC. HOUSTON, TEXAS 682-9842 •Q·l LEATHER-408 Weotheimer-627-9044 Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-each week in the Montrose Voice •RECORD RACK muoic-3109 S. Shepherd- 524.J602 •SHEER FANTASY gifta-1401 Weathei· mer-523-3325 oSHOE WAREHOUSE-2024 Wutheimer-524-8806 •SPORTS LOCKER clothina-311 Weothei· mer-5~ •STUDZ Adult Ne,.._1132 W. Alabama •TEXAS CARAVAN & Armadillo Flowera 2115 Dunlavy~7019 •TOTALITY STORE-1121 W Gray-626- 8780 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice M~S CHIC eyewear-520 Weotheimer-626- •TREYMAN rifta-407 Weotheimer-523-0228 5~~ JACK clothinr-1212 Weatheimer •WESTHEIMER FLEA MARKET 1733 W•theimer Attend MSA Softball games, each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond ~t Eastside •WILDE & STEIN book ato....:.S20 Weothei· mer-529-7014: say. Fortunes by Tycho For Friday evening, May 7, through Friday evening, May 14, 1982: ARIES-Jn your sign all week: Venus. Spring is in full bloom. So are you. Let others be serious and profound, you are up for fun and good lovin'. You can have all you want if you're careful not to be a user or an abuser. TAURUS-Jn your sign all week: the Sun. How much do you want, and how much do you need? You are keenly aware of quantity vs. quality and how those concepts fit into your life. Sometimes you have to be too much in order to find out what is enough. GEMINI-Jn your sign all week: Mercury. Action speaks louder than words, and you're giving and getting a lot of action. While a lot of people couldn't handle it, for you it's merely natural. "Go" is the keyword. CANCER-Some problems in the romance department cause minor tensions that you take care of easily. It just takes the understanding and kindness you can give. You know how to get to the heart of the matter, sometimes by way of interesting detours. UO-No love problems for you this time. All of a sudden your heart sings, or paints, or writes, or goes creative. You've got the urge and the energy to tell the world all about it. Make it a masterpiece. VIRGO-Keep on working on the dream machine. Don't let a strange stranger upset your momentum. Keep on keeping on with the work you're working on to make it all come true. LIBRA-In your sign all week: Mars, Saturn and Pluto. Look who's the leader of the pack! Assertive, dominant, able to focus your atten­tion on the changes in others around you, you're being admired. You have a special place. Go ahead and feel good about it. SCORPIO-Jn your sign all week: Jupiter. Passing through this week: the Moon, leaving Saturday evening. A shift in your normal routine could lead to a dramatic discovery. Someone is just waiting to be explored. But there is so much going on in your life that if you don't pay attention, you could walk right past. SAG In ARIUS-Jn your sign all week: Uranus and Neptune. Passing through this week: the Moon, from Saturday evening through Tues· day mnrning. Share wanderlust with a friend. Make plans now for an exotic getaway and faraway adventure. This is the year to go some­place different. Take care of mundane money matters, and you can go creative. CAPRICORN-Passing through your sign thi& week: the Moon, from Tuesday mnrning through Thursday evening. What's all this crap about being so secretive, all those s<>-ealled enemies? What's all this backroom business and shady dealings? Let it all hang out and see what the daylight has to offer. "Come out, come out, wherever you are .... " AQUARIUS-Entering your sign later in the wed: tlu! Moon, on Thurscfay evening, May 13. Excitement, fun and fantasy join to create a hassle-free time with no disappointments. You could make a new lri-11d. Vou oould make oJd lriendehipe stronger. You could make Just about anything, come to think of it. You're flying. PISCES-Hard as it is to remember, silence can be golden. As much as you think you have to say, even a simple discussion could lead to a real argument and a nasty fight. Be more playful. Try a softer touch. ©1982 Stonewall Features Syndicate Last Word by Henry Mcclurg 'Better Bartending' by Henry I'll think I'll write a book: Better Bartending by Henry. I'm a short person, so when I go up to a bar counter I'm frequently not noticed. Tall guys always get waited on fast. Us shorties always get overlooked. Well, I've developed some tactics to get the b~r­tender's attention and I'd like to share them with you. 1. Try standing on the counter. 2. Try standing on your head (this doesn't work at Mary's). 3. Try holding your breath. That one won't do any good until after you've fainted. But then you'll get the bartender's attention-except at J.R.'s, where even if you faint, the crowd will keep you standing. 4. Take a whip out and give the old counter a couple of whaps. 5. Aim carefully and give the old bartender a couple of whaps (this one works especially well at the Drum). 6. Say very softly, as though talking to someone else, "I wonder if the bartender would like to meet my muscular and handsome roommate." There are many more tactics that will get the bartender's attention, including the most popular one: laying down a wad of money on the counter .. Perhaps I'll share others with you in a future issue. But I probably won't. You'll have to wait for the book. 24 Sunday: 4pm Beer Bust, plus 'The Fingermore,' a horn quartet Sunday: Full Moon Madness, with Mother Montrose, courtesy of the Texas Riders · Monday: Pool tourney & leather night Tuesday: Movie night, Mel Brooks' 'The Producers' 1022 Westheimer, naturally
File Name pdf_uhlib_22329406_n080_ac.pdf