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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
File 009
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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 009. 1990-02-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10375.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-09). Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10375

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 009, 1990-02-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10375.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 9, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript B MONTROSE VOICE / FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 9. 1990 Domestic 2126 Movers 2160 Postal Boxes 2184 CLEAN Relerences Carlos 524. MOVEMASTERS AMERICAN MOVERS Security 2191 Furniture Painting 2163 ^™„LS„_ Refinishmo "— 21229 i i NO CHARGE Ii t ca" Joel Storage 2191.3 Income Tax .X PREPARATION ■.I.... (.<;, ADVERTISE FREi Pest Control „_._■£*■!_ 2167 CES ST0RflGE ac - ai no i ■ Tanning 2191.5 s:«5____™S. Piano Tuning ' SPSS p=^— 2f76 _tr VSiS Lawn Care, — Lan.scapiri^D =„„._„, NO CHARGE lor ■ fietju- 8490 MONDAY ONI Taxi 2192 "Sjga.r;,'""- Plumbing 2182 MaSanp l _____*£___Ti_ ITIddSdyC Licensee plumber, res,- llicensed) 2145 V».' o-,m™ - SlSSsTa Psychics 2188 Telephone & =-S_il,n'i, --,„„.«_,,„_ Paging 2193 S«" "Si°"jop.'°™Ic° - - >Re you Gyms, Health CM; COMPATIBLE? Pf_. g|. THERAPEUTIC bllS. £1, ipg S30CallS26- 2131 Paper Hanging Ticket Sales Ticket Sales _1_5 2193.5 219; Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants 2189.7 2189.7 2189.7 gSay Cheese &-&/ The Deli & Catering Co. Coming Seen lb Montrose 3926 Westheimer • Houston, Texas 77027 Phone 621-1825 Travel 2194 Travel 2194 Travel 2194 DESTINA TIONS UNLIMITED SAM RYAN DAVID R. GARUCK Owner - Travel Consultant Travei consultant (713) 529-2218 1-10 Hyde Poik. Suite 3 • Houston. Texas 77006 Demonstrators again demand more AIDS money SAN FRANCISCO (AP)—Demonstrators with the same message as a year ago, that there .should be more government spending in the fight against AIDS, caused far leas trouble for Golden Gate Bridge commuters this time around. "We could block the bridge again if we wanted to" one speaker said Wednesday.,hui ;il. during a mid-span rally ofthe demonstrators organized by the Stop AIDS Now or Else (SANOE) group. Some 100 chanting, whistle- blowing marchers crossed the bridge, using the east sidewalk, behind a banner reading. "AIDS equals Genocide" On the same dale last year, demonstrators went onto the roadway d stopped traffic for 46 minutes during thf There were 27 a bound traffic w about 1(1 miles. There v mg commute, ests and south- i backed up for arrests Wednes day, Jan, 31, and the only evident disruption to bridge routine was suffered by bicyclists used to riding the span in the morning. Bridge police kept the bikers off the bridge during the protest to avoid complications. Motorists experienced delays of up to 20 minutes, mostly because drivers were slowing down to look at the demonstrators. They were on the bridge from 7:30 a.m. to8:30 "1 have AIDS and I'm fighting for my life," said demonstrator Jerry Allhoti, 47, of San Francisco. "I feel this is a way to heighten consciousness to a decade of America's apathy and racism." "The government is guilty of astoundingly inadequate medical commitment to this disease." "We have to wake people up," said another demonstrator, Chaya Gordon. "The government isn't mgh and people edy- As the crowd milled about at the center of the span, some in their midst spray-painted graffiti on the sidewalk in red and yellow. The favored phrase was, "light back." The demonstrators chanted as they walked under a clear blue sky: "Women loving women, men loving men, we blocked the bridge and we'll do it again," and "Fight back, fight AIDS, say no." SANOE takes the stand that more needs to be done for AIDS patients and to find a cure for the fatal illness, which damages the body's immune system. Regents reject proposal to kick ROTC off campus By JULIE AICHER MADISON, Wis. IAPI-University of Wisconsin regents today rejected a faculty-backed proposal to kick the Reserve Officers' Training Corps from campus lo proteel the military's ban on lesbians and cay The board voted 13-3 instead to accept the recommendation of UW System President Kenneth Shaw that the university strengthen its effort to lobby Congress to change the military's policy. In December, the Faculty Senate al UW-Madison, the system's largest campus, approved a resolution asking the university to expel ROTC from campus in 1993 if the military continued to prohibit gays and lesbians. Several other campus groups followed with similar resolu- But Shaw responded this week by saying he did not believe severing the university's ties lo the military would effectively encourage ihe military to change its policy. Furthermore, elimination of the military programs would hurt those students who benefit from them, he said. There are about 440 students in Army, Navy and Air Force ROTC programs at UW-Madison. which has an enrollmenl ol 42.01)0, and a total of about 1301) ROTC students in the entire UW System, which has 135,000 students at 13 major AP LASERFHOTO Cadet David Danholzer of the Air Force ROTC at the University of Wisconsin-Madison asks the regents to altau the military programs to stay on campus -ral s; _ill.-_- The regents listened to testimony from 15 people before voting for Shaw's resolution, which called on the university to step up efforts ilbe- can in 1 !i>7 lo lobby Congress and the military, "J ihink il was the appropriate resolution to pass," said Regent Erroll Davis Jr. of Madison. "1 think we have to work a little harder than in the past. This resolution keeps the issue in Ihe front line and will force us to deal wilh it.'' The resolution passed today differs from one approved by the regents in 1987 because it requires UW administrators lo report annually to the board on the progress oi its lob- hying efforts lo change the militar y's policy. The 1987 resolution, which staled the university would seek to lobby the military, was criticized recently for being too broad and ineffective. The majority of regents said they agreed with Shaw that kicking the military off campus would not effect the change sought in a national policy. "By opting out we will have nothing to say about this issue." Shaw- told the regents "It's an issue that must be changed legislatively." An official -it ihe Army's ROTC of- fir,' al ['W Madison, ..ho declined to give his name, said KO'JV officials would decline to comment until seeing a copy of the regents decision. Jordan Marsh, ofthe Wisconsin Student Association, said he was disappointed by the regents' vote but was encouraged by some of the members' comments. Some regents said they would wanl ROTC banned if the lobbying to change military policy fails. "It siiows they arc serious about this and -am th stopped." he said. Substance cripples AIDS virus growth in test tube By MALCOLM KITTER AP Science Writer NEW YORK (AP)—Scientists said Feb. 1 that a new class of chemicals can cripple the AIDS virus in the test tube at extremely low doses, hut other researchers said its potential for therapy is not yet known. The new substances appear to be the most potent yet studied for stopping ihe virus from reproducing, scientists said in the British journal Nature. Human tests for effectiveness were still being planned, hut six healthy men tolerated one ofthe substances without major side ef fects, according to researchers from the Rega Institute for Medical Research in Leuven. Belgium; the Janssen Research Foundation in Beerse, Belgium, and in Spring House. Penn. They conducted laboratory studies of compounds called TIBO derivatives. In their tests, the compounds inhibited reproduction of the AIDS vim that were 10,000 to 100,000 lower than what is needed That compares to cone tions of 100 times to 10,000 times lower than a cell-killing dose required for AZT, the only approved rit ug for treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and for the experimental drugs dideoxycyt i d i ne and dideoxyinosine, the researchers This test-lube potency of the new compounds may bode well for avoiding side effects, but nobody knows what would happen in humans, cautioned AIDS researcher Jay Levy of the University of California at San Francisco. Many drugs that look promising in the test tube turn out to have unpredicted side effects, hesaid in a telephone interview. And higher potency in the test tube does not necessarily mean greater effectiveness in people, he said. Jeffrey Laurence of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center said he was concerned that the compound highlighted in the study did not work against close relatives ofthe AIDS virus, inchid ing HIV-2 and a mon key-carried version of the AIDS virus. That suggests the AIDS virus might become resistant to it by- mutating only slightly, he said. Leaders of Mass. gay groups vow to fight Silber candidacy By DANIEL BEEGAN BOSTON (AP)—Leaders of several gay and lesbian groups have pledged to defeat Boston University President John Silber in his bid for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination. John Silber is one of the most uncaring, inhuman people 1 have ever had the displeasure of being associated with," said Jeff Nickel, president of the Boston University Lesbian and Gay Alliance. Nickel criticized Silber on Thursday, Feb. 1, for refusing to include sexual preference in Boston University's anti-discrimination statement and for saying he did not consider homosexuality to be "normative" David LaFontaine, lobbying director of the Coalition for Lesbian and Gay Civil Rights, said activists would work against Silber as seriously as they worked to pass a bill las) year outlawing discrimination against gay people in housing, employment and credit. Noting that Silber has criticized reporters and opponents for taking remarks out of context, LaFontaine said, "We are here to put his remarks into context, in the context of the tradition of bigotry and prejudice." Colin Riley, a spokesperson for the Silber campaign, said Silber would not comment on the news conference. In an interview Wednesday, Jan. 31, with the Boston Herald's editorial board, Silber said he resisted including sexual orientation in the BU anti-discrimination policy because the language was too imprecise. "1 equate the formula they want me to accept, namely no discrimination according to sexual preference, with such a broad concept that it would approve any kind of sexual relationship imaginable,' Silber said. Silber said his view of homosexuality is no different from that of the Legislature, which passed Ihe law prohibiting discrimination againal gays while at the same time including language disavowing any endorsement of the homosexual lifestyle. He said he would not work to repeal that law. But Jean McCray, co-chair of the Massachusetts Lesbian and Gay Bar Association, said, "If he had been governor last year, there would be no lesbian and gay civil rights bill." McCray also questioned wheth-. er Silber would be willing to provide the money in his budget, if elected governor, to enforce the Students protest ROTC ban on gay people EVANSTON, 111. (AP)-Several Northwestern University student groups that oppose an ROTC ban on homosexuals are asking the school to eliminate the training corps program from campus. The students allege that Pentagon rules excluding homosexuals from ROTC programs violate North wes tern's anti-discrimination policy. Their criticism is part of a nationwide movement to change the military's policy. "The issue is that fhe university has a policy and that it isn't enforcing its own policy." said Karin Norrington, student government The Associated Student Government at Northwestern has called for the withdrawal of university support for the ROTC program unless military rules are changed. The issue will be taken to the university's board of trustees next month, Ms. Norrington said. "Northwestern University has a very progressive policy when it comes to dealing with discrimination," said Sean Maher, a member of the Coalition for Equal Opportunity student group, "It's pretty hypocritical to not apply it to certain groups." "Gays and lesbians are perfect candidates for ROTC" said David Munar. a junior who is president of North western's Gay and Lesbian Alliance. The campus just north of Chicago has offered ROTC programs since 1926. Cmdr. Steve Turnbull. executive director of Northwestern's naval science department, said the programs must follow Department of Defense regulations, Turnbull declined to comment on the issue and a campus cadet said ROTC students have been told not to talk about it. Banning lesbians and gay men from all branches of the military dates back to the 1920s, said Pentagon spokesperson David Super. Defense Department policy says their presence "adversely affects the ability to maintain discipline, good order, morale ... and... deployment of members who must live and work under close conditions," The policy has prompted protests at several other schools, including the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where the faculty voted in December to ask regents to end the school's affiliation with ROTC programs.
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