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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
File 007
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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 007. 1990-02-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10373.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-09). Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10373

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 007, 1990-02-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10373.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 9, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 MONTROSE VOICE I FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 9. 1990 Montrose residents say they fear 'over-development' ibKIBOWEH We are concerned about changes to Montrose as it Is "revitalizeci-' f Totalization Is often a lother word for devel- 0 OTient, which Isn't nec- e isarlly a "good" thing. C ne doesn't hear much s lout over-development, ait for human beings and ivironjnent It la a v^ry real problem. Our neighborhood may 1 _ a victim ofthe "you always hurt urbs> . people to the Montrose area may be the very things that will be first lost or destroyed. For us, the charms of Montrose are firmly based in its small houses, sidewalks, green lawns and grassy strips, and Its trees. These are some of the reasons why we continue to live here even though we work at jobs that have been moved out to the sub- long com- t ie one you love" syndrome. What "Development" Is destroying these physical charms One very obvious example Is the site of the new shopping center going In at Dunlavy and West Gray. Any trees and green grass growing there have been bulldozed and leveled to the ground, replaced by concrete. And we're not particularly excited about the new movie complex that will be a part of this shopping center. We don't welcome this threat to the River Oaks Theater. Less obvious are the effects of condo-iaation ... a phenomenon Increasingly apparent in Montrose. Condos, built as they are to every square inch of their lots, do away with lawns and grassy strips and trees. Some have been built four stories high, dwarfing neighboring houses and changing the local Skyline or contour. Traffic is also Increasingly heav- y. Crossing Dunlavy on foot anywhere between the light at West Gray and south to the blinking light at Fairview is at present very difficult- The shopping center will make this situation much worse. The same Is true for Shepherd Square on Westheimer To these examples a few more may be easily added: Richmond Avenue (an ugly speedway through the area) and the recent off-street parking requirement for new businesses. More paving over. (One thing some of these "bad development" moves have in common Is the accommodation of automobiles needs over human needs. Why not close the "Museum District" to all vehicular traffic)? We woijld like to see Montrose come alive once again, but not in some of the wsya we see happening around us. We are sorry to see so many civic associations Jump—apparently with little hesitation and much gusto—on the '"growth" bandwagon. Tower Theater variety show raises $2820 "That's What Friends are Forf 3 community-wide benefit held rvjdnday, Jan. 29, at the Tower Theater, raised a total of $2820, organizers of the event said this week. Net profits, after remaining catering costs of $430, totaled $2390, which will be distributed to four Montrose charities. Pending final payment of credit card charges, the Montrose Clinic, Bering Community Services Foundation, Montrose Activity Center and the Omega House Building Fund each will $597.50, said Larry Garrett (Mr. TGRA 199(1), co-sponsor of the colorful fund raiser. Brucella De'Vall and Melanie Ashcroft (Miss and Ms. TGRA 1990, respectively, also co-hosted the event, which featured a long list of popular local entertainers and a silent auction of items donated by community businesses and individuals. The auction raised almost $f>00 e|f the evening's proceeds, Garrett s$id. A framed print of the Houston skyline, donated by Besselman Galleries, was purchased by attorney Frank Luccia lor $210; Caryn D'Angelo ofthe Oplt 45's paid $300 for the _0-ineh gold Herringbone necklace contributed hy Pete Martinez. Two six month memberships to Olympia Health and Raquetball Club went for $80 each. Performers who donated their time and talents lo appear in the show were Alicia, Alto (featuring Tranae Chardon), "Cher," Billie Duncan, Brucella De'Vall, Larry Garrett, K.C. Glasse, Wayne Grabein. Cassandra Landa, Sheila Lennon, Marcie, Dyan Michaels, Teresa Moaney, Bob Moon, Jerry Morin, Rikki O'Shea, Pickles and Wilhemina, Debe Powell, Kathy Riser. Dan Wibel and Bill Davidson, variety ;show, auction or pre-show reception include: Appearances Jeans and Sportswear, Lynn Richard; E/J's; Garden Properties; Ralph C. Lasher: David Lewis; Mary's; the Montrose Voice; Pace Management, David Anderson (use of theater, valued at $1800); Printex Plus, Randall's Flagship. Shepherd Square; Say Cheese!; Southwest Kwik Kopy Printing, Marv Ginxel and John Gajewski; Arthur Talk; This Week in Texas Magazine; The Tower Theater, Jim Vaughan; Vicki Vines (Auctioneer), Call a Lily Florist, Missouri Street Pottery, Jim Walker and Mary Douglas. Regulators approve drug that could help Qase of Texas judge helps prompt change in judicial code tight AIDS Instructor on Japanese campus alleges firing over AIDS test RENO, Nev. (AP.-A teach er on the University of Nevada, Reno's campus in Japan claims he was fired for refusing to take fln "AIDS" test, but an official in Reno said the teacher was fired because he lacked the proper credentials. Pedro Pastrano, who has laught reading and writing al UNR's international division in Japan since April, said he refused to be tested for the AIDS virus HIV because u encouraged discrimination against foreigners and represented an invasion of privacy. Pastrano also claims he W'as told of the testing poll- cyonDec. 14, one day helbre he completed his third three-month contract at the UNR campus in Tokyo: In Reno. Jane Bauman, ihe academic coordinator for the Japanese campus, said she sent International Programs and Services Director Lee Thomas a memo saying Pastrano's contract should not be renewed for She said he lacked the proper credentials fur the job, he had needed a cash advance between the two contracts and he refused to take the HIV test. Dallas Judge Jack Hampton, recently public!\ (insured by the Texas judicial commission on . th- kif, was a figure in ihe American Bar Association's decision to include a ban against anti-gay discrimination in its Model Code of Jiitiicial Conduct, according to the National Lesbian and Gay Law Association (NLG LA). Hampton's case was cited as an "outrageous example" of discrimination based or sexual orientation by lobbyists lilt the legal group, in asking the ABA for the inclusion. In 1988, Hampton told newspaper reporters in Dallas that he had given a lighter year-old convicted murderer because the killer's victims weregay. He went on to say that some victims were more "innocent" than others, and that ifthe victims had not been "cruising the streets to pick up teenage boys" and "spreading AIDS around" they would not have been killed. The censure came after a disciplinary complaint against Hampton by the Texas Human Rights Foundation (THRF). In May, 1989, the ABA Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility issued a draft of its re vised judicial code, which banned discrimination based on race, sex, religion and national origin. After receiving oral and written testimony from NLGIj., the draft was changed to state, "A judge shall not, in the performance of judicial duties, by words or conduct manliest bias or prejudice, including but not limited prejudice based upon race, sex, religion, national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status, and shall not permit staff court officials or others subject to the judge's direction or control to do The ABA House of Delegates is expected to give final approval of the revised code, which will be presented at its February meeting in Los Angeles, NLG1.A members said on Jan. 16. Suzanne Bryant, one of Washington's two regional board members for NLG LA who appeared before the ABA committee there, said, "Because lesbians and gay men have received unfair treatment in the court system, many have not availed themselves of existing legal protections. Finally, we can expect and demand equal treatment under the law." Ron Albers, NLGLA co-chair, who testified in San Francisco, said he was "thrilled (the group's) lobbying had convinced the ABA to take appropriate steps and correct an oversight in the original draft:' Albers and Bryant's testimonies were instrumental in convincing the ABA to change the draft. The judicial code applies to judges throughout the country, and subjects them to disciplinary actions if they violate its ethical can- Larry Bagneris in runoff for New Orleans City Council By SHERICOHEN DARBONNE 11 Monlrose Voiee Editor ii Former long time Houston ac- ' tivist Larry Bagneris was one of two candidates to win a . place in an expected runoff for New Orleans City Council _Diet. C. The seat, for which 18 j; candidates competed in the general election Saturday. Feb. . 3, will be decided on March 3 ' (also a Saturday). Bagneris j' faces Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarksun in that election. Because of the number of candidates in the open field elections, a runoff had been expected in several races, and by Monday (he date for the election had been set. A Bagneris campaign worker said the camp had fully expected to continue into the runoff and was working on strategies for the "crucial" coming month. Bagneris, a former president of Houston's Gay Political Caucus (now HGLPC), left his hometown of New Orleans in 1970 to move here. It was after the move that he became active in the gay rights movement on a local and national level, although he claims his involvement in civil rights activities goes back much farther, to the age of 15. He moved back to New Orleans in 1986, Bagneris, a Creole with a history of involvement in anti-racism campaigns in New Orleans, is claiming much of the minority support in ihe election, especially in the black community. The East Bank—Wesl Bank geographical boundaries said to divide every local election are not as clear among minority voters, Bagneris said. "I think my coalition is strong enough as it is...we just need to work oil building the numbers," said Bagneris. "We have (support from) the black community, the gay and lesbian community, the French Quarter preservationists, and the neighborhood groups." "I've also been fortunate within the (gay) community, as I've had the support of all ofthe groups, the bars and businesses and the community organizations," Bagneris added. "I'm hoping I'll be calling (Houston) while you al! are in ihe middle of Let Us Entertain You Weekend...to give you the good news, (hat (he south has elected (its) first openly gay cit- y council person." Bagneris said, adding that he would want his victory to send a positive message to lesbian and gay political hopefuls here, "The message 1 want to send is that if you can see it in your mind and believe it in your heart, no matter what it is, it can be achieved," he said. New group forms for women against violence By LISETTA LAW The Monlrose Voice Women Against Violence Everywhere (WAVE), a new organiza- tic* aimed at increasing public awareness of violence against women, held its first large group meetingJan. ITatFirstUnitarian Church. Approximately 85 people, mostly women, met to begin organizing a festival/rally to be held oi July 7,1990. The location ofthe e' ent has not yet been decided. Jacsun Shah, one of the group's founder, began the meeting by recounting the origins of the group. The original idea for a protest against violence against women was spurred on by the October shooting of Ida Delaney by an off duty police officer, Shah said. Shah read WAVE'sstatementof purpose, which consists of four points: to protest violence Inward right to Bafety and well-being, to educate women to resist private and public violence, and to change the prevailing attitude that tolerates violence toward women. WAVE's progress to date was recounted by Cindy Beeler. who identified other groups which have offered assistance including Houston Area Women's Center. Mo ot rose Counseling Center, Houston Area NOW and the Women's Group of First Unitarian Church.. Beeler emphasized there IS much work to be dune and encouraged those present to contact other interested groups. She said thai WAVE would like to attract a wide variety of groups and individuals concerned with the proh- lem of violence against women. Also speaking to the group was Cassandra Thomas, director of the rape crisis program of the Houston Area Women's Center, who provided some statistics on violence against women. She stated that one out of four women will be raped and that one out of two married women are abused. The answer to what to do with this information is "taking action," Thomas said. Women must reclaim their power and their right to be safe, she said. Some WAVE members said that personal experience of violence or rape bad led them to the decision to act, while others spoke of the more subtle consequences of fear of violence, such a3theinability to go out alone after dark. WAVE members expressed hope that the planned festival will be the first step to changing attitudes about violence against women. Meetings will be held each Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. in the Women's Room of the First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin at Southmore. To volunteer or to receive further information call Jacsun Shah, 529-7329 or the Houston Area Women's Center, 528-6798. GROTON, Conn. (APl-Federal regulators have approved a new anti-fungal agent that medical experts say has applications for pa tients with AIDS, cancer and other disorders and will also help wit h heart transplants. Fluconazole, or Diflucan, was developed by Pfizer Inc. in Groton and will be manufactured there. Doctors say it is different from other anti-fungal drugs because it can be taken orally, is non-toxic and has few side effects. "The experience of people who have failed in all other forms of therapy has been quite good" wilh Diflucan, said Dr. Frank Bia. an infectious disease specialist at Yale-New Haven Hospital who has been conducting clinical trials. "Several of our patients have been turned around by this drug." Acquired immune deficiency syndrome suppresses the immune system, making those who have it vulnerable to infections, including fungal infections. Many cancer therapies also compromise the immune system, and after an organ transplant, the immune system is suppressed with drugs so the body does nol reject Ihe organ. Amphoteracin-B, one of the main anti-fungal drugs now in use. has gained a nickname among those who must use it as "ampho-terrihle" because of its toxic effects. It also makes many patients sick, doctors said. Dr. Patrick A. Robinson, senior associate director at Pfizer Central Research, said Amphoteracin has been in use nearly two decades, but a substitute has long been sought. "When I was doing my training in infectious diseases I was administering Amphoteracin-B, and I said, 'There's got to be something better"' Robinson said. "Now, 15 years lateij I'm involved with bringing it along. It's a pretty good feeling." Amphoteracin must be taken intravenously, but Diflucan can be taken either intravenously or orally. One ofthe characteristics ofthe drug is that it can pass the blood- brain barrier and act even on central nervous system infections. Brian McGlynn, a spokesperson for Pfizer, said the company will not release cost data on the drug for at least a week,
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