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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 005. 1990-02-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10371.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-09). Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10371

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 005, 1990-02-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10371.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 9, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE/ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9. 1990 New treatment Study: Positive test doesn't increase suicide ideas "1 * "1 _ fHiPAnn <ac__ri . i ..._.._. designed to boost immune system PITTS!.-.UGH (API-Researchers at'.the Pittsburgh Cancer Institute said they are hopeful un experimental AIDS treatment will enable patients' own cells lo inhibit replication of the deadly HIV virus and fight other infections that plague AJDS victims. The University of Pittsburgh has begun clinical trials of u new therapy designed to boost the immune system of AIDS patients, research ers said Jan. 25. The treatment involves removing ihe virus-killing white blood cells from AIDS patients, then activating the cells and returning them to the patients. "This is a completely novel approach to the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS, and to that extent is scientifically very exciting," said Ur. Monto Ho, chairperson of infec- ,d microbiology at the University of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh is the only site for the trials, which will involve six patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex. They will receive six doses of their own activated cells over lit weeks, followed by 11 weeks ol tests. AIDS disarms the body's natural immune system by crippling helper T-cells, which normally direct the virus-killing Cells, known us killer T- cells, to multiply to disease-fighting levels. The new therapy selectively removes and amplifies killer T-cells through the use of inter leu kin-2. The six-month study, which began in December, is sponsored by Applied Immune Sciences Inc. of San Francisco and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Dis- CHICAGO (AP)-Doctors need not be overly concerned about doing AIDS-virus testing for fear that patients might commit suicide if'they learn they areint'ected, according to the author of a new study. "Given the improved early treat ments for HIV-rclated illnesses, neither physicians nor patients should avoid seeking the test for fear they won't be able to deal with the results," said Dr. Samuel Perry, professor of clinical psychiatry at Cornell University Medical College in New York. "It is not an imminent death sentence, as many people believe!' With proper counseling, people who learn they, are infected with the AIDS virus are no more likely to think about killing themselves than those who learn they are virus-free, Perry and other researchers reported in a study published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. But regardless of test results, the rate of suicidal thoughts among people who have traits that put them at higher risk of get- ling the infection is significantly higher than the rate in the general population, the study found. Suicidal ideas persisted in about 15 percent of subjects at high risk for AIDS, whether they were found to be infected or not, re- seanhers said. The study reported on 244 men and 57 women who completed flo gauge depression at intervals two weeks before, and one week and two months after notification of results of their AIDS- virus tests, researchers said. "There's both a reassuring part of the study and a more worrisome part of the study," said Perry, the lead author of the study. "The reassuring part is that if people al risk for infection are given adequate pre—and post-lest seling, notifying them of j fection doesn't increase their risk of suicidal (ideas)," hesaid in a telephone interview Thursday, Feb. 1. "At least not if they are asymptomatic (symptom-free) and over a short time," he added. "The less reassuring part is that people at risk seem to have a high rate of depressive illness indepen dent of whether they're infected with the virus," he said, "When people come in seeking a test, it may be an opportunity to identify depression and make an appropriate referral." Doctors have been overly concerned about doing AIDS-virus testing "for fear patients are going to go totally out the window" if they learn they are infected, Perry said. "Wejust didn't find that to be A previous study found the rate of suicide in 1985 among men ages 20 to 59 who had AIDS—not just the infection, which may take years to cause symptoms, but the actual disease—was 156 times the rate of men without AIDS. And another study, of 1986 California death certificates found the relative suiciderate of men ages _0 to 39 who had AIDS was 21 times that of men without AIDS, the researchers said. In the new study, among the 49 subjects who were found lo be infected, rates of thinking about suicide were 28.6 percent at entry and 27.1 percent and 16.3 percent at the lollow-ups, the researchers reported. No subject reported increased suicidal ideas at two months. Among the 252 subjects informed they were virus-free, suicidal ideas decreased from SO.(j percent at entry to 17.1 percent and 15,9 percent at one week and two months after notification, the study found. Report: Infections decline, risk lessens for heterosexuals By DEBOHAH MESCE WASHINGTON (AP)-A new report says the number of Americans becoming infected annually with the virus that cau.es AIDS is declining, although the number of new AIDS cases will continue rising until 1995. The report's author, Peter Plumley, a consulting actuary in Chicago, also says the chances that a heterosexual not using drugs intravenously will become infected are remote and that AIDS prevention efforts focus too much on; this group. Plumley writes in the January- February issue of Contingencies magazine that the number of new annual infections with the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, peaked in 1986 and is going down. However, he says the total number of HIV-infected Americans will continue to rise until 1991, when 1.4 million will he infected. Also, the number of new AIDS 1995 and then begin to decline, and the number of AIDS deaths will peak at around 110,000 in 1997, Plum ley's projections show. Years can elapse between the time of infection with HIV and the onset of AIDS. No one is known to have recovered from AIDS. He predicted that by the year 2000 there will have been a total of 1.3 million AIDS cases and about 1.1 million AIDS deaths. His figures do not include HIV infections and AIDS cases among blood transfusion recipients, hemophiliacs and children, which account for about 5 percent of the total infections. As of Dec. 31, 1989, AIDS had been diagnosed in 117,781 Americans. Sixty percent, or 70,313, had died since June 1, 1981, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control, The CDC, which estimates that about 1 million people in the Unit ed States are HIV-infected now, is revising its projections for future spread of the disease. A draft report released earlier this month predicted that projections for the numbers of cases will be about 15 percent lower than previous CDC estimates. CDC spokesperson Gayle Lloyd said until the agency issues new projections, "no one here is interested in talking about anyone else's projections." Plumley said, "One of the most disturbing aspects of the AIDS epidemic is the number of people who have become concerned unnecessarily about tin- epidemic." The virus is spread mainly through contact with bodily fluids, including sexual intercourse, partir ularly anal six, and sharing of needles. Its chief vic tims have been homosexual males and intravenous drug users. A homosexual male's risk of contracting AIDS is about 1 in 500, according to Plumley. But the risk for a heterosexual engaging in vaginal sex is less than one in a million, providing their sex partners are not from a high-risk group. Prevention efforts within the homosexual, bisexual and intravenous drug user communities should continue, but "valid reasons exist to attempt to temper warnings issued to people whose risks are as remote as one in a mil- "Hyperbole could divert the focus from the truly serious areas of risk, damage credibility ofthe prevention efforts and create paranoi- ii among those who don't understand and jeopardize their chanc- es of forming the kinds of relationships necessary to health and well-being," he wrote. Attorney general files suit against 'ripoff charity CHICAGO !AP)-State authorities are suing to stop what they say is a "ripoff charity, preying on people's sympathy for children with AIDS. The lawsuit, filed Jan. 25, accused the National AIDS Prevention Institute of Culpeper, Va,; Apple Marketing of Houston; and three Cook County, 111., businessmen of "fraudulent solicitation of charitable donations for private profit." According to the lawsuit, for $6,000, Apple Marketing sells yellow plastic funnels called wishing wells to individuals. Those individuals then pay $2.50 a month to the Children With AIDS Foundation to use the foundation's name, while any remaining money goes to the "well operators," the lawsuit alleges. Edward Rowe, president of the National AIDS Prevention Institute, said Jan. 2b' in a telephone interview that his organization was "in the position now of arranging counsel" and that any further comment would be inappropriate. Rowe said, however, "there's a lot of falsehood" in the lawsuit. Illinois Attorney General Neil Hartigan, who filed the lawsuit, said the "ripoff participants had "preyed on the sympathy of the public for the plight of children with AIDS. "What they failed to tell contributors was that only nine cents a day would go to the charity," Hartigan said. "The rest of the money put in the 'wishing well' went directly into the pockets of these promoters." Rttet>urgh to host Softball World Series The 1990 softball season for plajrers Aspa_tcrfatr_-iuonaJgesture,_el- and officials of the North American egates from Atlanta, host city for the Gay Amateur Athletics Association 1959 Gajr Softball World Series, are (NADAAA) will kick off in mid-Feb- expected to formally present "The ruary In Pittsburgh, host series for NAGAAA Gay Softball World Series" this year's HAGAAA Gay World Se- to members ofthe Pittsburgh delega- rles. The Steel City Softball League oon in separate ceremonies will welcome delegates to the aseocl- g^^ p)a_ ^ expgataa M ^gtii In atlon-s annual spring meetings. j--^ NAGAAA-afi-liated leagues in At the meetings, delegates will dis- the last few weeks of April and culmi- cuss several subjects, ranging from rule changes tor the 1990 softball series to a routine review of the current bylaws. The delegates will also take agulded tour ofthe facilities to be used In Pittsburgh during world series play. Montrose Neighborhood Sports will ber leagues send teams to Pittsburgh In late August to compete In the 1990 Gay World Se- Thls year's event is expected to be the largest gay world series, as well as the first to be sponsored by one of the smaller NAGAAA-afflliated leagues. Members of the Steel City Softball League, under the auspices of Nancy Prlbioh, haven't let that fact hinder them, as they have lined up such sponsors as Strohs beer (.the official beer sponsor), USAlr (the official airline) and American Express Travel (the official travel agent). Talks are also going on with other potential large corporate sponsors, Prlbich said. Sponsorship is also being augmented by efforts of Pittsburgh Tavern Guild and the Lambda Foundation, organizers said. U.E Stars of Rodeo gvmhastic.-. #m~ rm.£-rm cumpiod mde fiwgerw mi. e-E-r eve NT: Trte _M_*W- fbMMeL uoffsf. Violence in Oregon prompts meeting PORTLAND, Ore. (AP)—A new wave of violence against homosexuals has leaders of the city's gay community concerned. The latest targets have been men who have gone alone to Laurelhurst Park, a meeting spot for gay men on the city's southeast A group of four men attacked a man with a broken bottle and a knife on Jan. 20, causing injuries that required 40 stitches. And a Portland State University student suffered injuries requiring 35 stitches in a beating on Christmas Day at the park. The violence spread downtown on Dec. 14 when two women were attacked and beaten by three men in a parking lot. The violence prompted a neighborhood meeting in the area around Laurelhurst Park. "My main concern is people's welfare and safety," said Mike Knowles, a neighborhood resident who organized the meeting. "No matter what a person's sexual orientation is, he doesn't deserve to be severely beaten up or killed." hesaid. A national gay leader, Kevin Berrill of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, said the Oregon reports were part of a growing nationwide trend. "Visibility has allowed us to organize, educate and challenge bigotry!' Berrill said. "However, it has also made us more of a target." Georgia Owens, a staff assistant to the Metropolitan Human Rights Commission, said the number of official reports of violence do not reveal the real frequency of violence against lesbians and gay men in Portland. She said many victims are afraid to report violence because the notoriety might cause them to lose their housing or jobs. ;. ® ffk i USf ?• fl Jj J *^J LfV r-^^-fi _/* n- if V>"" _^5_^--_. __~^5^fe=_____' Professional instincts are aroused within housing inspector Jennings. Heart Strings raises $691,000 The Houston production of "Heart Strings: The National Tour" raised at least $691,000, making the show the largest AIDS fund raising event in the city to date, according to Randall Shields, a member of the steering committee. The musical montage, sponsored by the Design Industries Foundation for AIDS (DIFFA/Houston) and Bering Community Service Foundation for ihe local presentation, opened for a single performance Saturday, Feb. 3 at Jones Hall. Billed as "Evenings of Hope for the Healing of AIDS," Heart Strings, a national touring show which spotlights local talent in each stop on ita 30-city tour, was designed to educate audiences about AIDS and inspire community involvement. The local show featured former Houstonian Tommy Tune as announcer. Local performers in the cast included Alexandra Haas, June Terry, students from the Humphrey School of Music the Bering United Methodist Church Choir and the Montrose Singers. Shields said the production is still receiving checks from people who either did not make it to see the show, or wanted to give more money. The figures are "changing every day." but a final total will be known by Feb. lfi, he said. The show did pass up the local organizers' goal of raising $500,000 here, Shields said. Eighty percent of the money will stay in Houston to help local AIDS programs, while 15 percent will go into a national pool to benefit cities not included in the tour. The national goal of "Heart Strings" is $4 million. "Hear! Strings" was originally produced in Atlanta in 1986. The national tour began in September, 1989. While the Houston show did not play to a full house, Sheilds said the audience came within 300 seals of Jones Hall's capacity.
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