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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
File 004
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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 004. 1990-02-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10370.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-09). Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10370

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 004, 1990-02-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10370.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 9, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 9. 1990, MONTROSE VOICE 3 Cleaning up Montrose: Crime fighting or class wars? From pa*;e 1 Sarah Urunon and John Zipprich of the Neartown Association, a coa- lition ui civic groups, think the weekly rentals and easy screening of applicants attract people who are dishonest. Hrunon, president of Neartown in 1989, and Zipprich, head of the organization's sexually oriented business committee, said Neartown got involved with the rental properties when members of the SOB committee realized many area prostitutes were operating oul of apartments. Brunon said Neartown then attempted to communicate with the "absentee landlords" ofthe "problem" properties. The first step, she said, was to confirm the problem of illegal activity at suspect locutions, usinn police call reports. Neartown would then compileslatistics on the location and do the title research to determine who the owners were. The lael step of <he process would be to send a letter to the landlord, informing him or her of what was happening ;u the address and requesting a response, she said. "Almost always, they would send bark a positive response," Brunon said. "Usually they would say they didn't know, and that they're going to make changes." However, Brunon claimed, the changes usually didn't happen, and ihe communication stopped with the first letter. "This isn't always true," she noted. "I can tell you one story...there was one (landlord) who had some real problems at one lime...he cooperated with us and wound up joining Older properties like this one, some in deteriorating condition, are home I many in Montrose icho are considered "til rtxii" fur humele.isrii'ss the Neartown Association. He worked with us and cleaned up his properties, and they're not a problem anymore. "If these people would just visit their properties more, if they'd pay attention to whut was happening there, it would help a lot. 1 think some property owners deliberately distance themselves from their prop ertics." Brunon continued. Brunon rejected the notion that the drive by home owners to "clean up" Montrose is a disguised war on the poor, or any resident group. "That's just ridiculous. Not all poor people commit crimes." she said "There are ways to screen applicants. We've made suggest ions lo these landlords." people who are Neartown members who own rental property. These are also low rent properties, and they keep them up. They go to the trouble of renting to people who are not involved in (crime) and they don't have the problems," Brunon said. Zipprich said his committee's investigations revealed several properties with crime problems also had lire and health code violations. Although the city is usually cooperative, initiating an investigation of such violations is a lengthy process, he said. Kor this reason, the groups have tried a variety of other ways to get the landlords' attention, including pickets of some ofthe properties. A recurring name in both Brunon's and Zipprich's files, as well as those of the North Montrose Civic Association's Jody Bob. is Lynn Bousquet, whose company, I. and Y Properties, operates six Montrose apartment complexes, in- eluding Las Rosas. Bousquet said she feels she and other landlords have been unfairly attacked for things that are not their fault. "I've really been trying hard to get the right kind of people into my properties," Bousquet said. "I've tried to impress il on the managers, that if they have bad vibes about anyone, or if there's a question they might he involved in something illegal, don't let them in. "Sometimes there's just no way for the managers to know. When people come in lo rent an apartment, usually they're all scrubbed up and looking good...then, after they move in, they let their hair down and it all comes out. You can only do so much when you're screening an applicant." Bousquet said she agrees that her screening application may not be strict enough. "In fact, yes, I do think that's one of the things we need lo do...we need to get more in- depth information." She stood by her weekly rentals, however. "It's always been my intention to provide clean, decent housing for people who don't have much money," Bousquet said. "Most of my tenants are blue collar workers who get paid by the week, and can only rent that way," she said. Repairs have been slow, she said, because Ihe company simply hasn't had the money to invest in the improvements. "We're getting it done, but slowly.'' she said. "People don't seem to realize that these problem tenants cause us quite a few problems too,..people move in. they look okay...then they just move out without paying rent. They trash the apartment and cause (problems!...and we don't get anything." "Tn be perfectly honest. 1 don't think the neighborhood groups are painting a fair picture;' said Bousquet. who added that the accusations hurt her personally. "I don't want to be associated with drugs and prostitution...! don't want to rent to that kind of clientele," she said. "I haven't been able to get out to my properties lately as much as 1 used to. I jusl had hack surgery, and 1 don't get around as much. But I do go to ihem," she said. "I think the problem can only he solved if we can all work together in a positive way. Not hy lights, not by attacking others. I'm not a fightijlg By the end of January, the dumpster al Las Rosas was finally emptied, but two tenants had moved out. Kozowyk said he also planned to move in April, at the end of his Police call reports showed a decline in criminal activity al two Montrose apartment complexes said by the homeowner groups to have a serious problem, one on West Gray and the other on Stanford, in recent months. While the printout indicated several calls related In drugs and other crime prior to November, most recent calls to the addresses were related to domestic disputes, "annoy- We're working to bring you a real newspaper. The Montrose Voice. The Montrose Voice AFH presents HIV-AIDS treatment workshop Published Fridays Cmtimutiitti Publishing Cnmpaiig 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 AIDS Foundation Houston will Dr. Gathe will address cur- sponsor an HIV/AIDS treat- rent medical issues regarding ment wor__s-_op on Tuesday, H_V infection fund AIDS, includ- Feb. 13 at Bering Memorial ing various treatments and the United Methodist Church, 1440 direction of current research. Harold, in the Fellowship Hall. Dr. Rios will cover many of the The three hour workshop will psychological Issues associated Montrose Neighborhood Events with HIV, including depression, denial, fear, anger and stress, and will also discuss coping skills. Houston's topic will be the pharmacological aspects of HIV treatment, such as begin promptly at 7:00 pjn. A panel of medical experts will discuss many of the current medical issues in HIV illness to overview the direction and trends in treatments for HIV infection and related illnesses, drug Interaction and The panel will include Dr, Jo- fects, and Kerr will introduce seph GaUie Jr., an infectious mazy of the current and up- disease specialist with HeaJth coming testing protocols avail- Associates of Houston; Dr able in the Houston area. Arturo Bios, director of Heights Refreshments will be served, Psychiatric Clinic; Edna Hous- donated by Kroger Deli, 3300 ton, Kroger's head pharmacist Montrose. The presentation and Jack Kerr, director of the will be offered at no charge and Houston Clinical Research Net- designed to be informal, with work. time devoted to questions and answers. For more information, please call the AFH education department at 633-6796. —Band membership The Lone Star Symphonic Band is currently seeking new members. The drive, with the theme "Get your instruments out of the closet!' will be going on until March 31, members said. Persons interested in playing an instrument with the band are urged to come to the rehearsals, held Monday evenings at 7:30 at Metropolitan Community Church, 1919 Decatur. All levels of playing ability are encouraged. The band is planning many events this year, but is most excited about the trip this August to Vancouver, Canada for Celebration '90: Gay Games III and Cultural Festival, the members said. The band will be joined there by other members of Les bian and Gay Bands of America (LGBA) and will perform during the opening and closing ceremonies of the games. Other events planned for this year include a trip to Denver in March for the LGBA conference and to participate in the Denver St. Patrick's Day Parade, a traditional Lesbian Gay Pride Week concert, spring and fall concerts and a year-end Christmas event with other community performing groups. The band will also be holding several fund raisers to raise the money necessary to send the group to Canada in the summer. For more information on joining Lone Star Symphonic Band or coming band events, call Connie Moore at 522-4SS2. —Meals grant Christian Community Service Center (CCSC), a coalition of 31 churches and Human Servic- es.recipients .added. To advertise or subscribe to the Newspaper of Montrose, call 529-8490 **************************** I beepersale.no . i *'■ j CREDIT NECESSARY. } * Wide Area Coverage. Call Today for * Montrose resident wins national script contest Montrose resident Richard (in'Kury Roach is one of three winners of the tenth annual Midwest Radio Theater Workshop script contest, a national radii i script search. The contest was funded with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Missouri Arts Council and the Arts Commission of Columbia, Mo., where the competition is based. The winning script, a radio play titled "Horse Arms," is Roach's tirst attempt at broad cast script writing. The play, based loosely on a factual news report, is about an American Indian described by Roach as deaf, dumb and retarded, who is caught chasing a Union Pacific locomotive on horseback and shooting at the train with a bow and arrow. Roach said the inspiration for the script came from a news clip he heard on the radio about a similar incident. "I decided it would be interesting to explore his motivation, what would make him do such a thing;' said Roach. Though the play devotes considerable attention to the character's trial. Roach said he did not follow up on the trial of the man in the actual Roach, also working on a stage play, said "Horse Arms" is his first finished work as a full-time writer. He has been involved in several local theatrical productions as an actor and director. Most recently, he appeared in the Tower Theater's production of ■'Shear Madness'' as antique dealer Eddie Lawrence. The Midwest Radio Theater Workshop, a project of KOPN community radio in Columbia began in 1980 as the first radio drama conference in over three decades. Each year, the workshop sponsors conferences ami training events, provides technical assistiinc. services, produces educational materials and sponsors the national script search. Other winners ofthe competition this year are Linda Kane of Sonoma, Calif, and Aaron Mcrmelstein of St. Louis. Prices. 1.6-1-1811 Page Me!, inc. *************************** AIDS legislation wins Miss. Senate approval Hy ROBERT NAYLOR JR. JACKSON, Miss. (AP)-A bill that would set up a state wide AIDS education program has been approved by the state Senate, but the measure includes no funding. There was no debate and no dissenting votes. "I was shocked^' said Sen. Robert Huggins, chairperson of the Senate Public Health and Welfare Committee. He handled the bill on the floor. It now goes to the House. "We took the heinous stuff out of the bill andjustcame with the education package to get our foot in the door" the Greenwood lawmak- The bill would give the state Department of Health 90 days after the measure's July 1 effective date to set up a state wide information and education program on AIDS and Hepatitis B, a viral infection of the liver. The program would have to stress sexual abstinence before marriage, fidelity during marriage, and homosexuality as an unacceptable lifestyle. The department also would establish workplace guidelines for employers to disseminate AIDS information to workers and for dealing with employees infected with the virus that causes the disease. The guidelines would be voluntary. The department's efforts would pay particular attention to "people with behavior conducive" to liansnussion of the virus, minority groups and people under 18 years of age. AIDS—acquired immune deficiency syndrome—robs the body of its ability to fight off opportunistic infections that almost always result in death to the victim. The human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, which causes the disease, is passed through the exchange of body fluids. Its victims have most often been homosexual men. intravenous drug users and hemophiliacs, although the disease has not been confined to those groups. Nationwide, more than a fourth of the AIDS victims have been from racial minorities. The bill would allow the Department of Health to contract with private, non-profit groups to help disseminate information, but at least one contract the agency currently has would be voided under the measure. The department contracts with the Mississippi Gay Alliance to help spread information to the homosexual community. But the bill says contracts could not be made with groups that "advocate or promote conduct that violates state law." der Mississippi law. Huggins said, however, that the Department of Health would have to design programs to get information to the gay community. The bill includes no funding for the programs, but Huggins said about $170,000 in grants already is available. He said the programs would cost about $400,000. The state does not have the money to spend, he said. "Since we don't have the money, we've got to got the grant route," he added. The bill doesn't go nearly as far as it was introduced by Sen. Mar garet Tate of Picayune or as far as a proposal sponsored by Sen. Barbara Blanton of Brandon. The provisions included by those lawmakers included widespread testing, including Blanton's plan for administering AIDS tests to marriage license applicants. HAIR LOSS: New Developments Peter H. Proctor, PhD, MD your follicles to further interferes ! :al action of male n to figure Balding eventually affects most men ; Balding begins when male hormones cau "miniaturize!' A subsequent immune reacti with hair growth. Agents which block the hormones often stimulate hair growth, a suppressing drug cyclosporin. Likewi compounds called "free radicals" s< Recently, the FDA approved the topical agent minoxidil or Rogaine to treat hair loss. Drugs often work by mimicking natural body chemicals. On the basis of similar chemical structure and activity, a chemical called EDRF is probably your body's "natural minoxidil!' Not surprisingly, agents which increase EDRF levels stimulate hair growth. Are you a candidate for medical treatment of hair loss? Using combined treatment, we can generally stop progression of balding, thicken what you have, and replace at least some of your recent loss, often better. On the other hand, "slick" bald areas rarely grow much new hair. Most persons end up Dr. Proctor is the author of over thirty scientifi. nost recently in the August AMA Archives of Derm ides- V Proctor Clinic Twelve Oaks Medical Tower 4 126 Southwest Freeway. Suite 1616 Houston. Texas (713)960-1616 or Fax # 960-9307
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