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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
File 003
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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 003. 1990-02-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10369.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-09). Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 003. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10369

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 003, 1990-02-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10369.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 9, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript Man- arrested in computer extortion Case Judge finds NJ. borough violated patients privacy front page 1 Popp, ofWillowick, about 10 miles east of Cleveland, was arrested Thursday, Feb. 1. Popp's attorney, John P Kilroy of Euclid, Ohio, had asked that Popp be kept in a hospital because of his mental condition, rather than he held jail. "He's an internationally respected researcher," Kilroy said. "1 don't think he'd pose any risk to ilee." Kilroy said Popp is an anthropologist and until December had a contract with the Geneva-based World Health Organization, working sometimes in England but mainly in Geneva and Africa. Gary D. Arbeznik, assistant U.S. attorney in Cleveland, said an arrest warrant was issued in London on Jan. IS contending Popp mailed about 20,000 diskettes from that city about Dec. 11. The U.S. attorney's office in Cleveland said the diskettes had information on acquired immune deficiency syndrome lor hospitals, researchers By MELANIE BURNEY CAMDEN, N.J. (AP)-A federal judge's ruling that holds a municipality responsible because a police officer disclosed that a resident had AIDS could have far-reaching impact on confidentiality cases around the country, some observers say. U.S. District Judge Stanley S. Brotman ruled that the Borough of Runnemede and one of its officers are liable for damages for disclosing to a resident that her neighbor had acquired immune deficiency "This case would conform and expand where I think the law is heading—that is a duty to maintain confidentiality and that it can only be breached where there's a clear and present danger to a third party," said Larry Gostin, executive director ofthe American Society of Law and Medicine, The ruling marks the first decision addressing the need for pa tient confidentiality outside an institution and established the privacy rights of not only the AIDS victim, but also their families, said Theodore M. Lieverman, the plaintiffs attorney. "The panic sparked by AIDS was widely known ..." Brotman wrote in a 3fi-page opinion. He said in his ruling Monday, Jan. 29, that it is "obvious" police need training to understand about the confidentiality of AIDS victims. An earlier settlement among other parties in the same case calls for the borough of Barring- ton to implement by Feb. 22 an AIDS confidentiality policy. It must also provide training for its police, medical and emergency personnel on the transmission of AIDS and how to protect themselves and private citizens, Lieverman said. The judge said that because such a policy was not in place in Runnemede, the borough is liable for damages. A jury will deter mine later the amount of damages the municipality will he assessed and whether another defendant in the ease should be held liable. Gostin said some cases have been filed around the country charging police departments with breaching the privacy of AIDS patients. Hesaid Brotman's ruling is believed to be the first of its kind involving a municipality. "Il s ethai elike this where there's liability should wake municipalities up" said Gostin, an associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health. In New Jersey. puhli. schools are required by law to have AIDS policies, but local police departments and municipalities are exempt from that requirement The ruling steins from a 198, civil complaint filed on behalf ot the wife of an AIDS patient and their four children The family was humiliated and ostracized in its community after the husband'*: condition was disclosed by a borough police officer, the suit charged. The woman's husband had tested positive for the HIV virus, according to Lieverman. He died in Sept. 1988, said the attorney, who did not know the cause of the The plaintiffs husband told Barrington police in March 1987 he was infected with the AIDS virus. He had been arrested on an outstanding fugitive warrant. The warrant was dropped and the husband was released. Later that same day, the man's wife was involved in a car accident as she left her Runnemede home, according to the complaint. When Barrington Detective George Preen and Runnemede Patrolman Russell Smith arrived at the scene. Smith allegedly told the woman's neighbor that the woman's husband had AIDS, the suit contended. The neighbor, Rita DiAngelo, al so named in the complaint, was an employee of the local school district, Ms. DiAngelo disclosed the information to theparents of other school children and allegedly told them that the woman's children also had AIDS, the suit alleges. "There was no information, medical or otherwise, to suggest that (the children) have AIDS or are infected with the AIDS virus," the suit said. Attorneys involved in the case declined comment Tuesday, Jan. 30. The Borough of Barrington and its police chief. Thomas Page, were named in the original suit. Brotman approved out-of-court settlements with both last month. "There's no question that confidentiality, education and non-coercive outreach are the keys to curbing the AIDS epidemic short of some type of cure," said Evan Wolfson, an attorney with the New York-based Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, a national AIDS advocacy group. Lesbian-Gay Pride Week co-chairperson resigns post At the time the diskette began causing problems in early December, authorities in London said it had been received by users in Norway, Sweden, Belgium, Denmark and California as well as Britain. Scotland Yard said at least 10 British computers were affected. Later in the month, a company in Bahrain, in the Middle East, also reported getting one of the disks but said il was discovered before it did any damage. Those who used the AIDS information program later found that their hard-disk data were destroyed. Arbeznik said the diskette packages included a message warning that ifthe diskette were inserted into a.eomputer, a leasing fee would be charged. _."It appears to me ... a clear warning was given on the package," K(lroy said in a telephone interview after Popp's court appearance. "The facts will show his actions were not At the end of the program, the diskette asked the computer user for a leasingfee of up to $378, then printed an invoice wilh a Panama City, Panama, address of a company called PC CYBORG, saying that was where the money should be sent, federal prosecutors said. Upon payment of the money, the recipient would receive a "decontamination disk" that would stop the computer virus, authorities said. By SH ERI COHEN DARBONNE Montrose Voice Editor Ken Wilson, the male co-chair of Lesbian/Gay Pride Week 1990, became the second co-chair of the event to resign. He did so Wednesday, Jan. 31. Female co-chair Veronica Diaz read Wilson's letter of resignation at the planning body's January meeting and said that self-nominations would be accepted and a co-chair elected at the next meeting (Feb. 28). In the letter, Wilson stated that a situation concerning his immediate family had arisen, requiring his full attention. Because of the responsibility involved in chairing the pride week event, Wilson said he preferred to resign so someone else could devote his full efforts to the project. "I feel 1 must now dedicate my time and energy in a different direction," Wilson Diaz said delaying the selection of a replacement until the next meeting would give the community more time to respond. Marion Coleman, originally elected female co-chair of this year's event, resigned earlier, Diaz was elected co-chair at the Nov. 30 meeting. During the meeting, Diaz announced that the pride week executive committee had developed a mission statement and "master action plan" for Lesbian. Gay Pride Week 1990 at a two day "team building workshop" in Galveston. The plan, a time table giving deadlines for completing plan- -., ^7 L \ Tf W^M for T-shirt marketing purptit ning of various details of the event, was on display in front of the room. I he mission statement declares that "Houston Lesbian/Gay Pride Week '90 is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization whose purpose is to promote and coordinate events which celebrate the diversity, unity and history ofthe lesbian r adaptation of Lcshian Gov Pride Week logo and gay community, in order to create a path towards a positive future for all humanity, including people of color, women, the physically challenged and our child- In other action, a set of proposed rules and guidelines for the 1990 Lesbian/Gay Pride Parade was accepted by the group. Missing from the draft of this year's rules, prepared by parade co-chairs Debbie Holmes and "Lady Victoria Lust," was the controversial language regarding the "image" and dress code ofthe pride parade included in the 1989 rules. Last year's rules called cross-dressing by men with facial hair "demeaning," discouraged "negative" political displays and encouraged participants to promote a "positive and favorable image." Some people had complained when that document was accepted that the guidelines violated their right to freedom of expression. The rules approved this year also emphasize the importance of a positive image, but the dress code is less restrictive, barring only clothing that might be deemed in violation of state obscenity statutes and city ordinances. The references to cross-dressing with facial hair were removed completely from the code. A ban on roller skates, skate boards and bicycles in the parade was included this year for insurance and safety reasons. A minor flap arose over procedural technicalities regarding the development of merchandise featuring the pride week logo. Marketing committee representatives Claire Koepsel and Leslie Perez displayed a sample tank top and T-shirt with the logo in two color combinations. Jim Vilven, co-chair of the public relations/graphics committee, said there had been some problems with reproduction ofthe art work lor merchandise, particularly when the logo was reduced. The print at the bottom of the logo (which reads 'Houston Lesbian Gay Pride Week 1990") cannot be read when the logo is reduced, he But Bar Wilson said the planning body had voted at theNov.1.0 meeting that Ihe executive committee would not be allowed to change the logo, and had also voted to accept the colors in one ofthe artist's renderings .shown at the November meeting as the official logo colors. Further, Wilson noted that those votes were not included in the copy of theminutesol the Nov. ;.0 meeting, which were accepted by the planning body at its meeting on Dec. 27. Members voted first to revise the minutes of the November meeting, then to allow the committee to adapt the logo to resolve the reproduction problems for marketing The tank top and T-shirt were later auctioned off in a symbolic "tirst B&leofofficial merchandise." Jack VaUnski reported orv tVie publications committee's plans for the 1990 lesbian.gay pride week guide, which will change to a magazine format this year (8 1/2 by 11 inches). The committee hopes to distribute at least 20,000 copies and mail out about 10,000, Valinski said. The next general business meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday Feb. 28 at Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin. The art of change in Montrose: Te Fi Faux' 8y JEFF BRAY The Montrose Voice 4ames Boswell, owner of Fe Fi Faux pronounced Fee Fye Foe), presents a striking figure in Montrose. Hip strawberry blonde hair has the fly &way texture of straw, combining frith the well trimmed beard to (nake him look like a nineteenth Century scholar—one of Freud's colleagues, perhaps. ". Instead, James is a child of the post war Baby Boom, raised in a middle class home in Ft. Lauderdale- Shunning the regular nine to Jive routine, like bo many of his contemporaries, he has settled in Houston, and lives asurpriMitgly flexible lite. No doubt, there are skyscraper Executives who would envy his freedom of movement and creativity, tut it was not an easy thing for him io materialize. '• Hisstudioisonthesecondtloorof p stark white Artigiani complex on Shepherd, across from St. Anne's Catholic School. Sunshine pours in through the south windows, gleaming off the mirror-like black painted _ "There used to be a building next floor that blocked the light," hesays, waving out at vacant space. Looking down, there is a rectangular lot ; >f brown dirt, freshly graded. Be- .-ond that is the Exxon car wash, Hi .-.zing wilh activity. The intersec- ion of Westheimer and Shepherd ' ooks frenetic, and above il all, in the ; irilliant haze looms the massive Randall's flagship store, its : jreen roof rising like some pagan emple—the Forbidden City on ■ tVestheimer. •Rumor has it Exxon is going to :xpand the car wash and make a ■onvenience store" he says with a ligh. He would prefer that to some :razy narrow highrise that would mee again block the sunlight. He shows off his unique works of lit, a product of Fe Fi Faux. "I had picked the name, and thought it was a little too clever Jwhen the Post came out the same (week with an article about faux fin- dishing," hesays ruefully. "The title of their article was the exact same as the name of my company" Irony seems to be a customary thing in his life. "It had nothing to do with me. but that's all right," he says. "Those little quirky things can work for you." James has been in business for three years, finding unique pieces of furniture and painting them in exotic colors and textures. He feels Ihe term'"faux" does not do him justice, because he usually shies away from the customary marble and granite finishes so many of his competitors Beautiful pieces of furniture adorn the room, painted in sumptuous greens, lush reds, and ancient greens. Some tables, which, in their previous life would be ordinary accessories to a living room or hallway, now look amazingly dramatic and old—almost fossilized, liven in the brightly lit room, their finishes paint that piece of fur have a sheen and a depth that only hint at the beauty they would possess under strategic lighting. "1 don't really keep up with other artists in the city," J ami'? says confidently. "I like to keep to my own in- Before he moved to Houston, James lived in New York, where he mot artists who taught him the art of faux finishing. While enjoying the cultural aspects of the city, he soon realized that New York was not an easy place in which to live. "1 wasn'l really prepared fur New York," he says, smiling. "I lived with my employer for awhile, then paid etofindmean apartment. It First and Houston, and that re than ten years ago, before ■ pi a, to 1: ! I v young. Everything I had was stolen within a week. I slept in a sleeping bag on the floor. You had to chip away the tub to see if there was any porcelain underneath. I eventually moved into the basement of the antique store where I worked." Hesays he never appreciated how well he had lived in Florida, and was thinking of moving back there when his mother contacted him from Houston, where she had just moved. At first, he wouldn't think of living here, but she informed him that she was dying of cancer, and he rushed to Texas to be with her. "1 thought Houston would be all tumble weeds. I didn't think il was a real city. I really didn't want to go back to Ft. Lauderdale, either. I didn't want to do trellis bamboo patterned wallpaper back there, which was about all there was to do hack then. Houston was very good for James was shocked at the size of the city, and immediately sot about finding work lo help support himself and his ailing mother He held down four jobs until after her death, then settled down into a routine, working consecutively through the recession of the mid 1980's. One delightful surprise was finding the arts flourishing so well in the city. He became a dresser for the theaters, and continues to enjoy this part time function. "I haven't gotten to dress any Biggies," he says, "but I've dressed next to the Biggies, like Pavoratti. I've started being requested for chorus and dressing rooms because I seem to have the personality to handle those big kids." During The King and I. he had to dress 16 men. Each costume is his- torically correct, from the corsets to I lie copes. Evi'i'v ho lion is exact, and some costumes are enormously heavy and ornate. One recent show had over 400 costume changes in 20 minutes, and an actor may have to lug around in over 60 pounds of clothing while trying to perform. While this is all very interesting, however, James finds his greatest satisfaction and fulfillment in his art. He used to love hunting for antiques, but finds that most pieces of furniture he really likes do not need to be painted. He refers to these pieces of furniture as "forms." "Occasionally I find a new form to paint. It's very difficult, because when I see something I like, I usually want to keep it like it is." He likes working for a designer who has very strong ideas about why apiece should be painted. Ifthe designer has a good reason for such an application, James feels good about holding the integrity of the furniture. "Lots of people say they hope I won't paint that piece of furniture. 1 wouldn't." He works often with chemicals, where corrosive materials are put on metals and woods to rreale an aged and pocked look. He prides himself in that he can turn a new piece of bronze into an archaeological find. He also paints floor mats in exotic colors, as well as whole floors with glazed finishes i "I don't advertise at all," he says. Perhaps it is because he is so soft spoken and shy. "I don't like to expose myself like that. 1 let them come in to me. "You have to be careful. You can't do a job just for the money. Someone may have a vision for a piece, but it will end up being forced. That's why I had to learn to run a business instead of being just the casual art isl. I've maintained it slowly and didn't force the issue. 1 let it all happen naturally, which is the safest for me. personally." The traffic has reached its fever pitch for lunch, and there is a police car being sent through the car wash. "They probably think I'm crazy because I'm always looking out the windows," James says, laughing. "They don't know what I do up here. Do I live here? Do I work here? They don't know." He looks over his latest project- gold leaf on canvas—very expensive. Very unuBual and painstaking. Very exclusive. "Maybe it's a fear of success," he wonders. "At least I'm finally documenting my work." The Montrose Voice is the First Choice! T3ETTER LA1PTIS &. QARDETIS Total Lawn Maintenance Commercial Residential —Landscape —Lawn Care —Tree Service Free Estimates best Prices
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