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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
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Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 002. 1990-02-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10368.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-09). Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10368

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990 - File 002, 1990-02-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10392/show/10368.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 485, February 9, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 9, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript To advertise or subscribe to the Newspaper of Montrose, call 529-8490 WEEKDAYS 9AM-6PM MONTROSE VOICE THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE □ Eommumts Jjidili.liiiui Ct>oiJI-_|f □ FRI DAY February 9- 1990 D ISSUE 485 MONTROSE WEATHER FRIDAY NIGHT Fai j SATURDAY Showers returning, high 75, low 60 SUNDAY & MONDAY Fair ai Cabbies pay respects to slain colleague By SHERI COHEN UARBONNK Montroae Voice /Editor Ai about 9:30 a.m. Monday, Feb. 5, the cars lelt the United Cab headquarters at 7202 Irvington. It was a curious spectacle, aline of 75-80 taxi cabs, most of them United's familial blue, but a tew from other tab cum pa n ies—Yellow and Liberty, all ol them bound in solemn procession for the 10:1 J() a.m. Veteran's Memorial funeral of Robert L. Fullilove. Fullilove, a United Cab Driver who took most of his calls in the Montrose area, was murdered on Jan. ;(U in his cab, outside an apartment complex in Southwest Houston. Last Thursday, Feb. 1, five suspects described by police as "lower Westheimer street kids" were charged in the shooting death of the driver. allegedly during a planned robbery attempt. The cab driver had picked up the suspects at a restaurant in I010U block of Bissonett in far southwest Houston at about 7:45 p.m., police said. He drove them to the complex, in the 10400 block of South Drive, where he was shot in the back ofthe head by one of the suspects al about 8:00 p.m. He was taken to Ben Taub Hospital, where be died Wednesday. Jan. 31. The youths, arrested Wednesday in Montrose, later told police they had planned the crime, including taking the cab, robbing the driver and shooting him if he resisted. The suspects ranged in ag. from 14 to 21. ,, .1.. Funeral procession for slain cab driver Hubert Fullihu-c included To-HO Two were juveniles. Fullilove, 50, was one of several United drivers who regularly worked Montrose, the company's original and loyal customer base. Rarely seen without his trademark cowboy hat, he was a familiar face to many regular- riders, his fellow "In most pla Monii'ost-based cabbies said. The (cab driver's) I news of his killing broke a five year down a rider," Hi lull in attacks on cab drivers, whu in Hooston are entitled to refuse service when they feel their safety is threatened, said United Cab vice president Kills Houslon. In many major cities, such refusal of riders is not an opiion, 1 louston said. they'll yank a e if they turn » said. "Here, 1 There is no limit on the number ot riders a cabbie can lake on a trip, Houston said. According to police reports, the five young riders in the Jan. 30 incident all had an "innocent," non-threatening appearance. "(Fullilove) had been with the company for a long time. Most of the drivers knew him. What happened was a shock to all of us," Houston said. Attacks on drivers have been un- ommon in Houston since 1985, when "the last rash" of such crimes had laken place here, Houston said. Marcus Manuel Trammel], 21, the alleged gunman, was charged with capital murder. Nona Mary Kyers. 19, who is on probation for burglary, was churned with aggravated robbery. Both were held without bond. Christopher Bradley, 18, also was charged with aggravated robbery and is being held in lieu of $20,000 bond. Two juveniles, aged 14 and 16, are being held by Harris County juvenile' authorities. The 16-year-old, arrested at Covenant House, gave |i<> lice the names of two other suspects. Bradk. and the other juvenile were spotted on lower Westheimer and arrested on the street; Trammell and Byers were picked up later at a restaurant on Westheimer. Though a few United drivers stayed on the streets Monday to pick up riders, most participated in the funeral procession, Houston said. Backstage at the Tower charity show Preparing to market the Pride Week T-shirts Man arrested in alleged computer-extortion By KR1STI UMBRE1T CLEVELAND (A World Health Organ. ant appeared before ;> federal mugis- trate Friday, Feb. 2, on charges of ex- During an initial court appear- tion. tortion and blackmail Involving a ance, Joseph W. Popp, 39, told U.S. Bartunek said he would schedule '"""" l"ke AIDS mJu.malum disk that Magistrate Joseph W. Bartunek thai another court hearing after Popp is '- —ippled computers in several coun- he is under a psychiatrist's care and evaluated by two psychiatrists to see es. must take drugs for a mental coiuii- whether he is competent to face ex tradition proceedings. A hearing date was not set, and Popp was ordered to remain in the Bedford Heights jail in soburban Cleveland, continued page 3 Cleaning up Montrose: Crime fighting or class wars: By Jill I .HI COHEN DARBONNE -l_orr.ro...' Voice Editor in a weathered, half-vacant apartment complex in an older residential neighborhood of Montrose, a poverty-level tenant decides he's had enough when he is awakened by a mouse crawling across his forehead. Although he has no where else to go. is living week-by- week and is caring for a mentally retarded person in his home, he rallies his neighbors to demand a meeting with the landlords. Heal- so calls the city health department and the neighborhood newspaper. The complex's young manager nervously tries to placate the complaining tenants. He tries to explain that both he .and the owners have repeatedly called the waste company to empty the dumpster that has sat full behind the main building since November. He tells them they will get rat poison for the rodents, and that their hot water—which most have had to do without since the Christmas holiday freeze—will soon be restored. He tells the newspaper reporter that most of his tenants can't afford to go anywhere else, that they are clean working people and not criminals, and that if the complex were to close, it would be one more vacant building like the "crack house" across the street. A few blocks away, a Montrose neighborhood activist gathers reports from several area civic clubs to which she belongs. The leaders of these clubs, she says, are "just ordinary people" who got fed up with crime—specifically, drug dealing and prostitution—in their own back yards. She says Montrose homeowners and the police who patrol this district have known for a long time that criminals openly ply their trade "out of some of these seedy apartments." They meet their "tricks" or dope customers on the street in front of private homes, or in people's yards. Often, she says, they don't even bother to go back to the apartment to complete the deal. She wants the complexes cleaned up or condemned. A landlord who owns several of these older Montrose properties, some of which she admits have crime problems or code violations. says the civic groups aren't being entirely fair. She insists that she is doing everything in her power to keep the criminals out, in spite of poor health and lack of funds to invest in her properties. She says she is trying to work with the neighborhood groups and the police to get rid of the problem, but it isn't easy. Both she and her partner say they are well-intentioned business people who got caught in Houston's economic downturn and have not yet been able to re- Although everyone involved says they know there is a problem, they disagree on how to go about solving it. They also differ in their assessment of who the real victims are, and why. •lames Kozowyk, a resident of l.as Rosas Apartments at 416 Fairview, said he has complained repeatedly to the managers and owners of his complex about unsanitary conditions. He said that although he likes his apartment and thinks the complex "could be fixed up easily," certain problems were becoming impossible to live with. The apartments' rodent problem bad been getting out ol'hand, and the only garbage dumpster had not been emptied since before Thanksgiving, he said. After the holidays, extremely low water pressure and no hot water in most apartments was added to the list of tenant woes, as the Dec. 22 hard freeze left several broken water pipes on the property. On Jan. 9, Kozowyk said he got the last straw. "I woke up this morning and this mouse was on my head!" he said. "People shouldn't have to live like this." Kozowyk and other Las Rosas residents pointed out other mice, live and dead, in Kozowyk's tidy one-bedroom unit. One tenant said she had found a nest of baby mice in a dresser drawer. Kozowyk said he knew when he mid ha ■. It's better than noth ing. Who Promise seen using malaria drug on pneumonia By WOODY BA1RD MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP)-Tests on laboratory rats indicate that a drug developed in England to combat malaria may cure a form of pneumonia that kills many AIDS every day wilh sufferers, say scientists at St. Jude ■James Kozowyk points out a couple of problems "All of these same peopli are doing the whining...most of them will say they can't go anywhere else, they can't al lord it. As tar as the problems, we're trying to get them taken care of. I' been on the phi the dumpster peopli just changed dumpster companies, and we've been having a lot of trouble with it," Chapel said. "We put out poison lor the mice, and were going to got some more. People just need to be patient," he Regarding criminal activity, Chapel claims l.as Rosas doesn't have a problem. "1 think most of them (criminals) moved down the ju'Jp road." he said. "I try to he really picky about who 1 get in here. Now across the street tin a vacant building) they go in and out." "We used to have some of the street hustlers living here. We don't anymore." Chapel said. "But if you think about it, even they have to have somewhere to go.' But. while citing money as a reason why many near downtown apartment dwellers will live with "less than perfect" conditions, Chapel admits the rents at his own complex aren't dirt cheap. Children's Research Hospital. "If you could prevent this pneumonia in AIDS patients, it would probably increase their life spans by almost double," said Walter Hughes, a physician who directs the hospital's research on AIDS, or acquired immune deficiency The testing with rats indicates the drug both prevents and cures Pneumocystis pneumonia and St. esearchers are in the first phase of trying it on human beings, Hughes said. "The animal studies show that this drug kills (the pneumonia) and there's been no toxicity associated with it;' hesaid Wednesday, Jan. 31. A report on the research will be published in the February issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a publication of the American Society of Microbiology. "We're talking purely of animal studies, but the animal model used itudy drugs of Pneumocystis A one-bedroom goes for $70 a pneumonia have always been r_ called the health department and Rhonda did move out to live with wee[[i an average monthly rent of markably predictive of the human city housing department that an her mother. She said it was partly .4.3 if> for an apartment without air disease," Hughes said, investigation could result in the because of the boy's health prob- conditioning. Tenants also supply apartments being shut down, and lems and partly because of condi- all of the tenants being asked 10 tions at the complex). Stuart Chapel, the on-site manager of the complex, characterized Kozowyk as a "whiner" who was never satisfied. "Some of the people here are notorious winners and criers. James is one of the worst." Chapel said. Although he does not receive a salary for his duties as manager. Chape] said he is grateful to his . employers, who gave him a rent- free apartment and helped him get on his feet, "It's not perfect, no, hutit'sreal- ly not that bad. It's better than what 1 had...better than what I leave. "I really don' point." hesaid. "1 was told (the cil- y) WOUld help us find someplace to go...I'm not sure where I heard that. But nomatterwhat happens, 1 won't move into another place like this one." Rhonda, another resident ofthe complex, said she was also prepared to leave. The mother of a new baby and a handicapped two- year-old son. she said she was afraid of the germs carried by the mice and the dirty dumpster. (On Jan. If), after her son was hospitalized for respiratory problems, their own heating unite. Comparably priced rental properties, and ing the many lower-priced if the tenants pay their own utilities, areavaila- id his staff has been study- malaria drug, known as hydroxynaphthoquinone or 566C80, for about a year and a half. The drug was synthesized by Wellcome Research Laboratories "But we don't ask too many 0f England, and St. Jude said its questions,' Chapel said. Prospec- studies have been supported by live tenants fill oul an application other tests there. form, but are not subjected to if the human tests with 566C80 lengthy credit cheeks and other re- are successful, trie drug could be quirements. "A lot of people, for available for general use by AIDS some reason or other, don't answer a whole lot ol questions 1 lili out five pages of forms. Some of them would be turned down some where else. It doesn't mean they're bad people," he said. Continued page 3 sufferers ii 1 year r two, Hughes drugs used now for Pneumocystis pneumonia are only moderately effective with AIDS suffers, be said.
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