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Montrose Voice, No. 339, April 24, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 339, April 24, 1987 - File 001. 1987-04-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10258/show/10221.

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(1987-04-24). Montrose Voice, No. 339, April 24, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10258/show/10221

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 339, April 24, 1987 - File 001, 1987-04-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/10258/show/10221.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 339, April 24, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 24, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript montrose The Great. God Buyout Arthur Hoppe, inside HOUSTON WEEKEND WEATHER Partly Cloudy and mild lf 1 P .... '• .. , I 1] , .. • l .. lllf at night, low near 58. Sunny and warm days, high near 86. l t I , , \l , \' APRIL 24, 1987 ISSUE 339 .•. . .• .l. ..... _.. '-------- --- -- Shephard Lays It on in Alley Production Bill O'Rourke, inside It's Art Fest We eke Fun and Sun in Montrose Human Testing of AIDS Vaccines Set to Begin News, inside Romanovsky and Phillips Gay Lives in Song Feature, inside BEGINNING THIS ISSUE: (]JrJriJ E3rJrJriJ, ONLY IN THE MONTROSE VOICE 2 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 J N, IT'S HERE! CALL AND TALK TO OTHER HOT GAY MEN - LIVE! ( 7~3) or (214) 976-4242 A telephone service that offers you an opportunity to meet other interesting men just like yourself. Explore your most outrageous fantasies or just listen in. Our conference calls are hot, live, and totally uninhibited. Call (713) 976-4242 and hook up with as many as 8 hunky Texas guys now! You must be 18 years of age to call. A service charge of S2 + tolls, if any, billed discreetly to your phone bill. ' TSU to Host Congressional Hearing on AIDS Minorities and AIDS will be the topic of a congressional hearing to be held Mon­day, April 27, at the Thurgood Marshall School of Law at Texas Southern Uni­versity. The hearing will be convened by U.S. Representatives Henry Waxman (D.­Calif.), Mickey Leland (D.-Tex.), and Jack Fields (D.-Tex.) and will be con­ducted between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. in room 102 of the law school building located on the campus of the university, 3100 Cleburne. All three congressmen are members of the House Subcommittee on Health and the Environment. Divided into three segments, the con­fere. 1ce will address the medical aspects of acquired immune deficiency syn­drome, the delivery of services, and its impact on minorities. In the United States people of color make up a disproportionate number of persons with AIDS. Thirty-eight per­cent of all those with AIDS in the Uni­ted States are minorities. Eighty-seven percent of women with AIDS are people of color. Ninety-one percent of all child­ren with AIDS are non-white. In Newark, New Jersey, 60 percent of those with AIDS are heterosexual black people. Fifty percent of those with the disease in Washington, D.C. are non­white heterosexuals; and in New York City, nearly one half of the AIDS cases a re heterosexual and 80 percent of those are black or Hispanic. Most heterosexua lly infected persons with AIDS in the United States have been black or Hispa nic women. Hetero­sexua l women who are not drug abusers have the highest rate of increase of any group. Additionally, the life span of a minority diagnosed with AIDS is sub­stantially lower than that of a Cauca­sion. Addressing the medical aspects of the disease will be Dr. Peter Mansell of the Institute of Immunological Disorders and Dr. Robert Jaffee of the Centers for Disease Con trol. The issue of black teen­age pregnancy and AIDS will be included in this segment and Professor Taunya Banks of the University of Tulsa School of Law will testify. Houston Health Director Dr. Charles Haughton will address AIDS and deliv­ery of services. With him will be Dr. Robert Awe, Jefferson Davis Hospital, a nd a representative of the Persons with AIDS Coalition. Co-director of the American Founda­tion for AIDS Research Mathilde Krim will speak on the impact of the epidemic on minorities. Joining her will be Sue Lovell of the AIDS Foundation Hous­ton; Joe Perez, Gay and Lesbian His­panics Unidos and Rev. Williams Lawson, Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church. All testimony will be recorded in the Congressional Record and formal tes­timony will be fo llowed by a question and answer period. Following the hear­ing, 13 local AIDS support organiza­tions will host a luncheon in honor of Krim at the Hunt Room, 3404 Kirby. The hearing is open to the public. Lun­cheon tickets a re $7.50 per person and may be obtained by calling Gene Har­rington at 748-3555. Jn Montl'.ose, Neady EvHyone Reads the Voice APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 My dearest DANNY HAPPY BIRTHDAY -- 8 -,A--DJi_)_ _ Conference !.t"1.L' _. Slated for 1 2 3 S'DVf March on ~.A.. Washington Make an investment in pleasure­try our POINTEX™ super sensitive condoms. fl) CL :::> UJ z ::> ..... (.) HAPPY ANNIVERSARY Here's to many more of both!!! with all my LOVE Gary ~ :0 () 0 z 0 SUPREME SENSATION EXCITING NATURAL TOUCH LIFE AGAINST DEATH Condoms are so far the best way to prevent not only AIDS, but almost every other sexually transmitted disease. POINTEX™-one of the best latex condoms-transparent an super thin lubricated with silky smooth sillicone fo; extra sensitivity. B AUTOMOTIVE 3 t SPRING SPECIAL ~ ~ Air Conditioning ~ w Check & Charge PRIORITY ORDER FORM 26.95 Oil & Lube 24.95 Cooling System Service 27.95 1411 T11ft - 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS Please rush my order for POINTEX™. I must be ~~d~~~r::,:~~:sfied or I will receive a prompt B 3 doz . S.,!.Jk11'5 $ 1 0.95 $ __ 6 doz . $~ $ 1 8 .115 $ __ Po et age&Haftdflng S 2.00 TOTAL $ __ Send Check or Money Order (Ho COD'• pleaee). Name Street. ____ ______ _ CitM ____ _ ___ State.__ZiJl----- ail ~0v~.u~;~~:U~~"~~~'n~:!'' C3 §AME DAY TYPE­ §ETP"fER§ A N EW DIV J8 JON OF THE MONTROS E VOICE We'll t,vpeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get .it to us .by Noon (or call f~r a pickup by 11am) and we II have tt ready by Spm (size of the job permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT! If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) ' 81TVPESTVLES TO CHOOSE FROM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 A planning conference of the South Central Region for the National March on Washington will be held Saturday, April 25, in the Atlantic Room of the University Center of the University of Houston. Sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Student Association of the university, regional representatives from Arkan­sas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, as well as Texas will meet to begin planning for the October 11, 1987 march. According to Jim Owens, a Houston representative, planners will "try and begin organization to get as many peo­ple to the march as peoosible." Owens added that workshops will deal with fundraising, outreach, public rleations, and logistics. Kay Osburg of the National Office will present the key­note address. The march itself is intended "to dem­onstrate to the Congress, the President, and the nation as a whole, the continued social, political and economic oppers­sion that plagues the gay community, explained Mary Walters of Houston, who is also a member of the national steering committee for the march. Walters added that "most impor­tantly, the march will show the world that in spite of the oppression, the inequality dealt out by the courts, and the specter of AIDS, the gay community will not go back in the closet, but will proudly march forward, demanding the rights and liberties that not only do we deserve, but that the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights guarantee us." The planning conference is scheduled to begin at 9:00 a.m. and conclude at 5:00 p.m., followed by entertainment. Registration fee is $10. Registration will continue up until the beginning of the conference. The Houston Headquarters for the National March on Washington is located at 3317 Montrose Blvd., Suite 1055, Houston, TX 77006. More informa­tion on the march and surrounding events may also be obtained by calling 528-7531 or 523-6109. AIDS Foundation Elections New Board Members A new chair, three new officers, and 13 new board members were elected by the AIDS Foundation Houston, Inc. at its April 15 board meeting. Joseph Tumlinson was elected to chair the board. New officers joining him are Claudia Langguth, regional administrator of Texas Dept. of Human Services, as secretary; Edward E. Mayo, Ph.D., Cenikor , Inc., as treasurer, and Del McGee, assistant treasurer. New at large trustees are Harris County Criminal Court Judge Mark D. Atkinson; Gayle Fallon, president Houston Federation of Teachers· Fran­ces "Sissy" Farenthold, attorney; Chris Kihnel, PWA Coalition; Indira Lanig, M.D.; Marietta Marich, actress, Harris County Criminal Court Judge Michael McSpadden; developer Joe Russo; Rev. Robert Schaibly; Houston Teachers Union President Signa Segrest; Margery W. Shaw of the UT Health Science Center; Robert Vogler, U.T. Health Science Center; and Ben Wheat­ley. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 It's Alw-ays Colorful When Festival Comes to Montrose "Soap" by the Staff of the Montrose Voice A Spring ritual returns to Montrose this weekend with the 1987 edition of the Westheimer Art Festival. The festival will be held on Saturdy and Sunday from 10:00 a.m. until dusk each day. The official festival will be held in the block bounded by Westhei­mer, Montrose. Lovett and Yoakum. However, it is well known that the activ­ity, color and excitement happens all along the lower Westheimer strip. Mary's welcomes George Robbins to their staff as Little Napoleon o Bartending Chutes is holding a new logo contest. Enter by July I for a $200 prize. The winner will be announced July 4. With art on a lot of minds this week­end, a good stop will be The 611 for a exhibit of Indian painting and decora­tions by Wayne Means. Allen Thomson will be displaying his wares at Dirty Sally's. It's happy anniversary to Becky and Betsy at The Ranch as they celebrate their first year of ownership this Sun­day. Celebratory free drinks will be served from 2-4pm and $1 well and long­necks flow the rest of the night. For an enjoyable afternoon happy hour, stop by and see Jack, Jimmy, and Chris at Rooster's. It's always a good time. Horse. Bacchus rodeo contestants will be holding a fundraiser at that bar Sun­day, May 3, 6:00-8:00 p.m. The Colt 45's slave auction will benefit their honorary member, Manny Flowers, at Chutes. Seems a Rooster's customer lost his pants at the P.T.L party. Was he angry because no one really cared to see what was under those jams? Mary Ann Mahony and Mata Hari play at Bacchus every Wednesday in May o Munchin' John at Pot Pie tells us to watch for some new summer specials coming your way very soon. They sound delicious from what we've been told. Maria. Lucy and Pickles in their finest Easter garb Craig at The Ripcord is planning a garage sale for next Saturday on the bar's patio. More info? Give Craig a call. KJ's new manager is Ray Dennis. May be worth the drive out to see this one. o Fun(d) Raising Jessica Renee, Miss TGRA candidatP, will be· helding a fundraiser Sunday, April 26, 6:00 p.m., at The Rock 'n' De Leon. Proceeds wil help offset some of his medical bills. Marty Singe[, Montrose Clinic's can­didate for the Ripcord's Prime Choice contest on May 30, will be out and about selling raffle tickets to benefit the clinic and promote a style show for summer and leather wear. o Plain Dirt John tells us that Maria (not her again) was slapped by her dream man, Judy Rainbow the Clown won the Bonnet Contest at Sally's Ed, owner of EJ's, serving cocktails Easter Sunday Rappin' About AIDS SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)-Two 18- year-olds won $500 from the city Health Department for coming up with a win­ning "rap" song to teach children about AIDS in a language they can under­stand. It's got a nice beat and is easy to dance to, as well. Leroy Palmer and Johnny Williams, students at City College, urged teenag­ers to exercise caution to avoid contract­ing acquired immune deficiency syndrome. "Everybody thinks AIDS is serious, but a lot of them say they aren'tworried about it because they are straight (hete­rosexual)," Palmer said. "This is the kind of stuff kids should know. They should be careful." Dozens of high school and college stu­dents entered the informal contest announced by the Health Department earlier this year. Palmer and Williams outlasted other entrants in a "rap-off' last week. Contestants were required to include at least two of the following three sub­jects in their compositions: AIDS, sexu­ally transmitted disease and drugs. The winners managed to include all three. Some of their lyrics: "Get protection and use sex safely ... " "Use condoms ... or just say no" "AIDS is claiming victims like the cocaine blow" "It's a heavy situation so don't take this light" montrose VOICE HOUSTON, TEXAS ISSUE 339 FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1987 Published weekly Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Conlenls copynghl 1987 Office hours: 8am-6pm Henry McClurg.1publisher·6d1tor Linda Wyche/managing editor David Roumfort -production SUBSCRIPTIONS _______(7 13) 529·8_49_0 _____ ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulhollandladvert1smg dlfector Ken Boge; account e1teculive ----- POSTMASTER Send address correchons to 408 Avon­dale. Houston. TX 77006-3028 Subscr1pt1on rate m US (by Voice carrier or US Mall) S1 25 per week (upto21ssues).$65peryear(52weeks).or $32 50 per six months (26 weeks) National advtJ1tis1ng representative R1vendell Marketing. PO Sox 1268. Plamfjeld. NJ 07061, (201) 754-4348 Final advertising deadline All display ads Spm 2 da~ P"Or to pubhcat1on dale Allclass1f1ed ads 2pm 1 day prior to pubhcauon date Nolle• to •dv•rtinrs Advertising rate schedule Eight-A was effective Apnl 11. 1986 Responsibll1ty We do no1 assume hnanc1al respons1bthty for c111m1 by advertisers but readers are asked to advise the newspaper of any SUSPfCIOn of fradulent or deceptive advertistng and 1usptet0ns will be 1nveshgated NflWS servn:• Uniled Press 101ernational APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Problellls in the Oldest Profession By Joan Hanauer UPI Feature Writer On a rainy afternoon in New York City, a young man in a blue windbreaker strolled along West 45th Street, looking into electronics store windows. As he passed a seedy hotel, a sta­tuesque woman in a bright red dress and red spike heels leaned out the front door. "Come on in, handsome," she half­whispered. "You can pay me anything you like." The man hesitated before waving the woman off. He continued to walk down the street, passing under the marquee of a new Broadway play, "Safe Sex." "Are you afraid she'd give you AIDS?" a passerby asked. "You bet I am," he said. In New York, Boston, San Francisco and elsewhere, fear of AIDS has been added to the dangers of the street and both prostitutes and their customers worry that they will be among the increasing number of heterosexual vic­tims of what once was considered the "gay plague." In some cities, AIDS has scared off the "johns" and business is bad. In oth­ers, fear of AIDS seems to have made little difference. Most cities report that fear of AIDS has not pushed police into clamping down on prostitution, but health author­ities are trying to educate the heterosex­ual population in general and women in particular-of the danger. Health and police experts say in gen­eral prostitutes use condoms to protect themselves from infection from their customers but they do not use condoms with their pimps. A study of prostitutes in seven areas of the country, released by the Centers for Disease Control March 27, revealed that more than 80 percent of the 568 women interviewed said at least one of their partners had used a condom. the CDC reported that prostitutes' hus­bands and boyfriends were much less likely to use condoms. The state of affairs of the oldest pro­fession varies from city to city. In New York, where police said there has been no "spring offensive" against prostitu­tion, Inspector Ronald Johnson, com­manding officer of the public morals division of the New York Police Depart­ment, said: "We've been asking around and have come to the conclusion that there's been no change. The number of prostitutes out there is about the same and the number of johns in the areas high in prostitution is about the same. AIDS doesn't seem to have any impact that we'te aware of." He said New York area prostitutes were using condoms even before the AIDS scare. A police crackdown in Hollywood, the hub of the prostitution trade in Los Angeles, bP.gan three years ago-not because of AIDS but because of the cres­cendo of complaints about blatant side­walk sex transactions. The 40-officer Prostitution Enforce­ment Detail has swept a way most of the streetwalkers who once crowded the sidewalks along Santa Monica, Sunset and Hollywood Boulevards. Many female prostitutes now ply their trade in other areas. Male prostitutes constitute the largest part of the remaining Holly­wood streetwalker problem. Hollywood vice office Howard Leader said there is an awareness of the AIDS danger among prostitutes of both sexes and the use of condoms is prevalent. "We'll find them carrying a dozen or so in their pockets or purses when we arrest them," he said. "A lot of them are afraid they'll catch AIDS from the johns." In Chicago, street business is bad. "AIDS is cutting down traffic," Sgt. Ted Faulkner of the police department's vice squad said. "They're not at their old haunts in the same numbers they used to be. "I'd hazard a guess it's because AIDS has cut down on the number of their customers. What once might have been considered a lark is now a life­threatening situation. A lot of men com­ing in from out of town used to look at it as fun and games, but now it's taking your life in your hands." Police in San Francisco said they were not cracking down on prostitutes particularly because of the AIDS epi­demic, nor has the Health Department pressured the department to do so. "We are seeing street prostitution drastically reduced by 60 percent due to multi-dimensional tactics and probably because of AIDS," said police Lt. Den­nis Martel. He said multi-dimensional tactics mean presenting a high police profile, with half the vice police making arrests in uniform while the other half works undercover. Policewomen work under­cover to catch male customers. In Boston, health officials and prosti­tutes said the spread of AIDS has not slowed prostitution, but sexual practi­ces are changing and the use of con­doms is more common. "We have not increased or decreased any of our activities enforcing laws against prostitution," said police spo­keswoman Jane Sheehan. "Our officers SUMMIT-AREA CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC N Sports Injuries Nutritional Counseling Trigger Point Therapy Physical Therapy Massage/ Meridian Therapy Applied Kinesiology Insurance Accepted Flexible P~~ent Plan John C. Lowe, D.C. Maryann M. Tomko, D.C. Shuvlr S. Bhattacharya, O.C. MARQUART EDLOE I i..---1----1-59 s OPEN 7 DAYS and evening hours 3222 MARQUART, HOUSTON• 963-9143 have seen a drop in the number of prosti­tutes around, mainly because the Com­bat Zone (once the city's red light district) is dying." P. Clay Stephens, a physician's assistant who works with prostitutes at the Fenway Community Health Center, said many prostitutes confide they will now only consent to intercourse with "men they know, and with condoms." Helen McNamee, Boston representa­tive of COYOTE, a group that advo­cates decriminalization of prostitution, said the problem is not with the women. "The johns are the ones who resist using condoms,:.: she said. "I never met a prostitute who didn't want to use one." AIDS Action Committee director Larry Kessler said: "In talking to the prostitutes, we find there is a great level ofknowledgethere. They are being careful. There is a two­tier system having sex safely, and being paid extra to do it (without a con­dom)." He said some pimps pressure women into unsafe sex because it is more profit­able. One hooker in downtown Boston approached a reporter and asked, "Want love?" When told he only wanted informa­tion on how AIDS was affecting her, she said: "I haven't had any problems. I always make them use rubbers." Business, she admitted, was down. Business also was down in Philadel­phia, where increased police activity spurred by community activists and combined with widespread fear of AIDS has made prostitution an endangered profession. Arrests of hookers have doubled in the past six months as police squeeze them out of areas that once were their turf. Those who are left are dogged by citizens groups and cops and shunned by former customers who fear AIDS. "Prostitutes by and large protect themselves from their clients. Many use condoms," said Rick Reich, AIDS servi­ces coordinator for the Clark County (Las Vegas) Health Departruent. He said the problem involved their pimps and boyfriends, who were less likely to use condoms. He added: "Prostitutes by and large are conser­vative sexually. They are not what one thinks of as a swinger, indulging in all this wild decadent stuff." There is another side to the AIDS problem. In Miami a sergeant in the Metro-Dade Police Strategy Investiga­tion Division said social diseases do not dictate poke enforcement policies, which are continuing as before. He also said that fear of AIDS has made policemen more reluctant to arrested proititutes, adding: "They scratch you, fight you, spit at you. If anything, it (AIDS) probably causes officers to be a lot more hesitant to have contact with these people. They would rather not have to put them in the car. This AIDS thing causes it to be even more of an undesirable job." Montrose Voice It's The Place to Advertise .---------- STERLING It is business as usual on the streets of Atlanta, where police operations are normal. In San Jose, Calif., there are fewer women on the streets selling sex- A but plenty of buyers. "There's too many customers out I there," said Lt. Dan Bullock. "There's I too many people who are willing to take I a chance. The AIDS scare hasn't had the dramatic effect that you would think I or even hope that it would have." Paint and Body Centers 1107-D Upland Dr. Just N.W. of Katy Frwy & Wllcrest Redeem this Coupon Free Exterior Auto Detailing (Machine Bull and hand palish) Prostitution is legal in some parts of I Nevada, although it remains unlawful I in Las Vegas and Reno. Where bro~ are legal, no brothel I employes have been found infected with I AIDS. There is no way to measure accu­rately AIDS in street prostitutes else- I where. with any Paint or Bodywork with Invoice exceeding $350 Oftef votld until Mery 31, 1987 932-9401 Open 24 Hours Phone for Appts. between 9am-6pm Life 8c Heatth Insurance Don't Burden Your Loved Ones with Unexpected Financial Responsibilities Cynt_h_i a H Mansker ... _ ·····- 3311 W. Alabama Suite 100 Houston, Texas 77098 (713) 522-2792 24 Hours 6 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 Health Experts Take to the Air Sunday WASHINGTON (UPI)-The head of the Public Health Service will take the fight against AIDS to the radio airwaves April 26, spending one hour on a talk show program answering callers' ques­tions about the deadly disease. Dr. Robert Windom will be joined on the NBC Radio News "National AIDS Call-in" by Dr. James O'Brien, a Cali­fornia psychiatrist who treats acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients, and Dr. Clifford Lane, deputy clinical director of the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases. In addition to the phone-in, the three­hour show will include taped discus­sions with Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, AIDS researchers Dr. Tony Fauci and Dr. Samuel Broder, sex therapist Dr. Ruth Westheimer and psychologist Joyce Brothers. "Information and education are the only weapons in our arsenal," PHS spo­kesman Jim Brown said. "The doctors at the Public Health Service will use every possible avenue to help inform the public. This NBC program will be a major part of that effort." Brown said Windom enjoys live shows and thinks they are very impor­tant. He said the physician was comfor­table on radio and used to host a television show on disease prevention in Sarasota, Fla. "We've got to educate people about this disease," Brown said. "ATDS is a killer." Texas Senate Adopts Blood Bank Bill AUSTIN (UPl)-The Texas Senate adopted a bill Wednesday that would allow blood banks to conduct certain tests without the donor's consent but refused to consider a bill that would pro­tect "whistle blowers" in the workplace. The blood bank bill, sponsored by Sen Chet Brooks, D-Houston, requires that each blood donation be tested for infectious diseases, including AIDS, and does not require that the donor be informed or provided counseling regarding the test. The bill would provide protection for donors by making their records confi­dential Current law does not provide for the confidentiality of donor records since they are not considered medical records under the Medical Practices Act. The bill would allow blood banks to report positive blood test results with the donor's name to other blood banks but it would prohibit the disclosure of the infectious disease a donor has or is expected of having. The Senate failed to muster enough votes to suspend the rules and bring up a bill by Sen. Carl Parker, D-Port Arthur, that would protect workers who make good faith reports of safety viola­tions in the workplace. Under current federal law, employees who are fired or suspended for reportinl{ alleged violations of occupational health and safety rules have no cause of action against their employers. Under Parker's bill, employers would have to prove that an employee was fired for good cause in the 90 days after reporting a health or safety violation. Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose r----------- Spanish Flower Mexican Restaurant 4701 N. Main 869-1706 A Taste of Mexico 24 Hours Daily Luncheon Special llam-2pm Spanish Flower Dinner: Beet Enchilada, Chicken Tostado, Chile con Queso, Rice. Beans. reg 575 Special $3.75 Chicken Fajitas for 2 $8.95 Good Any Time With this Ad Expires May 30, 1987 Closed Tuesday IO:OOpm. LR::'I!n_w=:m_:s~a:_l~~~ ...J young, y &prou§f Gay teenagers h~~e· ~o·.·pi~~~ tog~ with their questions. Here is a can­didly written book addressing such concerns as: Am I really gay? What should I tell my parents? Is it a good idea to come out in school? How can I tell if my best friend is gay? YOUNG, GAY AND PROUD! $3. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. 0 Here is $4.00 for Young, Gay and Proud! O Here is $8.00 for one copy each of Young, Gay and Proud! and One Teenager in Ten: Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth, in which teens tell their own stories. address __________ _ city __ ---------­state ip·-----­Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 One teenager in ten has a secret. One Teenager in Ten: Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth EJ1tcJ by Ann Heron "For every generalion lhat comes nut, these essays will be invaluable." Gu~ Co1111111111ity News 'There is a rare sensibility <lisplaye<l in many of these essay> lhal is nothing short of aslonishmg International Gay News Agency (IGNAJ an important an<l necessary book powerf u I and very pc.u~ndnt " Womauews "One teenager m ten": according to Kinsey, that's the proportion of gays to 'traighh m this country. One Teenager i11 Ten . twenty-eight young men and women from all over the United States and Canada, from fifteen to twenty-four year> of age, speak out about their coming-out experiences - about what it is to be young an<l gay in our society today. $3.95 m bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail . ............ ..................... TO ORDER ....... .......... .. ....... ... ... .. Please sen<l me_ copies of 011e Teenager 111 Te11 at $4.50 each. postpaid. Enclose<l is $. _ name _ -- address __ _ city _ _ state •"zip Al YSON Publications, PO Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208 P-5 BALDING? We offer medical treatment of hair loss under physician supervision. Proxidil, our new combination of pre­scription hair growth-stimulators, works when plain Minoxidil fails. Q Proxidil™ featured in The Bald Book, Men's Health and National TV. • Over 1000 individuals, 3 years work • Twice Board-Certified MD.PhD Internationally­Recognized Dermatology-Drug Researcher. •Active research program assures you have the most advanced treatment possible. Why accept less Contact: ~ Proccor / MPB Clinic Twelve Oaks Medical Tower 4126 Southwest Freeway Suite 1616 Houston, Texas 77027 (713 960-1616 Something Different: Superior Service RECjULT5 Pest Control 223-4000 Licensed & Regulated by Structural Pest Control Board of Texas APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 --------------------------N-e-i-g-h-b-o--rh--o-o-d- -S-p-o-r-t-s ~u Jaltemnriam Sports News from Montrose & Community Groups (left t'J right) Houston Tennis Club Tournament director presenting Virginia Slims tickets to winner Cindy Puente and runner-up tennis jub to Kathleen Webb .. Puente Wins Women's Tennis Tourney Cindy Puente was the big winner of the Houston Tennis Club's "All Lad.ies Tournament" held Sunday April 12. She defeated Kathleen 10-2. Wendy 10-1. and Dimples 10-2 for a convincing 30-5 record. Kathleen Webb edged Dimples 9-8 for second place anri a 21-19 record Dimples finished with a 20-22 and Wendy won the booby prize 5-30. HTC returns to its summer hours this Sunday, April 26. The new hours are 9:00 a.m.­noon. For more information. call 524-2151 ••Houston Frontrunner Completes Boston Marathon Frontrunners Houston wish to congratulate Rick Potter on completing the Boston Mara­thon held on April 20. Five members of the group participated in the Heart and Sole Run on April 12. All members finished in the top ten percent of the field The three mile race is an annual event sponsored by Transco to benefit the American Heart Association. Three Frontrunners traveled to Brenham on April 18 to take part in the Ninth Annual Blue Bell Fun Run. Completing the race were Steve Rheinecker with a time of 41·42, Michael Applegate at 47 57, and Randy Cumbaa at 52:50. Individuals interested in joining Frontrunners Houston for scheduled runs or a race may call 663-7761 for further information. Spousal Rape Bill Sent to Senate By Bob Lowry UPI Capitol Reporter AUSTIN-Legislation that would make it a crime of sexual assault for an AIDS sufferer to force their spouse or live-in lover to have sex was approved Wednesday by the Texas House and sent to the Senate. The bill cleared the House on a voice vote. Teenagers Not Making Many Changes for STD's DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (UPl)­Teenagers may be worried about sexu­ally transmitted diseases, but they're not making much effort to avoid con­tracting them, a survey showed. The survey, conducted among young vacationers on spring break in Florida, found that 84 percent admitted to being "very concerned" or "somewhat con­cerned" about the prevalence of sexu­ally transmitted diseases. Nearly a third of the participants-31 percent-know someone who has had a sexua lly transmitted disease, said t'he survey, conducted- by Carter-Wallace Inc. But the deluge of warnings about transmission of AIDS from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop and the con­troversy over condom ads seems to have had little effect on taking precautions, the survey said. Halfoftherespondents said they used a condom as protection against vene­real disease, but a substantial number, 23 percent, said they take no precau­tions against disease. Admonishments that celibacy is the best preventive measure seem to have even less effect. Only 3 percent of the respondents said they engaged in sex less frequently due to fear of contracting a disease. Nearly 500 teenagers and college stu­dents participated in the survey. The AIDS-related amendment was quietly added to the bill by Rep. Jim McWilliams, D-Hallsville, who said he is worried about the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. "According to several instances on record, spouses don't inform their mates whenever they have AIDS," he said. "They just keep on having sex with them and their other partners. "This is not a social issue or a moral issue, it's a costs issue. I was primarily trying to bring to the attention of the general public the problems that relate to AIDS." McWilliams is also sponsoring a separate bill, which he said is stalled in committee, that would require the spouse of an AIDS victim to be notified about the disease. "We have a conspiracy of silence, it seems, in the Legislative process on the AIDS issue," said McWilliams. The sponsor of the spousal rape bill, Rep. Debra Danburg, D-Houston, said she believes Mc Williams' AIDS amend­ment is irrelevant to her bill. But Danburg, whose district includes Montrose, said she did not oppose the amendment Tuesday because she feared the controversy and floor debate would kill her bill. "He's (McWilliams) trying to attach AIDS-related amendments to every sin­gle thing that has to do with sex, she said. "I will not speculate why he's try­ing to do that." McWilliams denied he had tried to amend other bills, but he said he under­stood why Danburg was displeased with his amendment. "She represents the largest homosex­ual community in the state," he said. "I wouldn't think she'd be very happy about it." The spousal rape bill passed the House in 1985, but it died in the Senate, said Dan burg, because the Senate spon­sor was "intimidated by rape jokes." Danburg's bill seeks to change state law so that marriage does not imply that a spouse automatically consents to sex. Twenty other states have passed similar laws. The bill sets out eight instances, including violence or threat of violence, where sexual assault could be alleged against a spouse. Penalties for sexual assault range from a class A misdemea­nor to a first-degree felony, which car­ries a maximum 99-years prison term and $10,000 fine. •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Building­Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKENDS SCOTT ANTHONY CUTSINGER Scott Anthony Cutsinger, 27, passed away in the early morning hours of April 16. 1987, on Montrose. A native of Evansville, Indiana, Scott is survived by his mother and father. Joyce and Carroll; brother and Sister, Shawn and Sharyl, and many friends. Scott moved to Houston in 1981 where he taught persons with mental retardation. As a hobby. he served as film critic for the Montrose Voice for several years. His friends would like to extend their appreciation to Dr Crad, to his visiting nurse, Henrietta. and especially Boll and Gary who made the last few months of Scott's life as comfortable as possible Friends of Scott will gather at MCCR. 1919 Decatur, for the 10'45 a.m. service on Sunday, April 26. Following lunch. a mem­orial service will be held at hos home. 2416 Whitney, where his ashes will be scattered over the rose garden. Scott's humor, enthusiasm. and energy continues to be felt by all who knew him. Fade to black. Scott. EMMET A. FAULKNER July 31, 1944-April 15, 1987 Emmet A. Faulkner 1s survived by his par­ents, Mr. and Mrs. Emmet Faulkner of Sudbery, Ontario. Canada. He will be remembered by the number of students whose lives he touched while teaching speech and drama at Ross Sterling High School. Donations may be made to the AIDS Foundation Houston. Inc. LEONARD OWEN REBER Leonard Owen Reber 46. died on Good Fri­day, April 17. 1987. Present board member of Houston Gay Political Caucus, Len chaired the membership committee. Len 1s survived by his mother. Lulu Reber. Sonoma. CA; friend , Donald Bush. Hous­ton; brother, Godfrey Reber, Sacramento. CA; specfal friend, Tim Hall Houston; nei­ces and nephews Memorial service will be held at First Uni­tarian Church, 5210 Fannin, on Saturday, May 2, 2:00 p.m. "In a short time. we shall all betogeother." Direct Burial or Cremation pr ccd !ooni $395 r;:m&I~ 692-5555 8 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 AKE THE RIGHT CONNECTION • • on Houston's outrageous New conference call our exciting phone service has become the rage In canfornla, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Now we have made It available to gay men right here In Texas! we are the first and biggest company In the field-our conferences are HOT!! When you dial you Will be connected to an ongoing, UNINHIBITED CONFERENCE CALL, with up to nine men from all over Houston. NOT PROFESSIONALS! Just nine interesting men, like yourself, anxious to make new acquain­tances. LIVE! NOT A RECORDING. TOP or bottom, short or tall, young or old, they·re all here! It's only $2 *-cheap by any standards, and billed discreetly to your phone bill. No credit cards are required. Your anonymity is guaranteed. call 713-976-9696 now and see what you have been missing. • Houst~~: 713-976-9696 *This call is only $2 in most of the 713 area codes. Matching is random and you may not hear another caller as:ld yet still be charged. call at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi­tional toll charges may apply in some areas. APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Group Seeks Accurate Portrayal of Homosexuals in the Media ~ ..... --------~--, : s10°0 I I I I I I By Catherine Gewertz LOS ANGELES (UPI}-Chris Uszler and his band of beneficent spies are out to change the world and they have started by infiltrating Hollywood. The Mission accepted by Uszler and his organization, the Alliance for Gay and Lesbian Artists, is deceptively sim­ple: change the world's perception of homosexuals by making certain they are represented realistically in movies, television and theater. "Prejudice and hatred comes from unfamiliarity and uncertainty," said Uszler AGLA's executive director. "The diore people know, the less likely they are to act in a bigoted or prejudiced manner when in their lives they meet someone gay or lesbian." Or.e of the methods the 8-year-old organization employs in its makeover of the gay media image is to reward posi­tive portrayals with its annual media awards held this year in March. AGLA's Media Watch Committee monitors and reacts to the images of gays and lesbians projected in film· and television and intervenes in gay-related issues concerning working actors in Hollywood. After Rock Hudson died of complica­tions from AIDS in October 1985, Media Watch publicly attacked news media reports that AIDS hysteria was sweep­ing Hollywood. In the wake of Hudson's death, the committee worked to educate actors and directors concerned about open­mouthed kissing scenes, telling them that medical experts did not believe kissing put them at high risk for the 'deadly virus. But one of AGLA's most important missions is in the hands of sleuths, AGLA members working in dozens of Hollywood niches, from secretaries to big-name producers, Uszler said. While on the job, they keep an eye out for signs that gays are being badly por­trayed in upcoming projects and then pass the word toAGLA's Clearinghouse Committee. Sometimes tips come in the night, anonymously and unsolicited. "Someone will mail us a script or leave a message on the phone machine that this thing is going on, or this story is being drafted and we should know about it," Uszler said. "Sometimes they leave us names so we know who to approach." And approach they do. Clearinghouse Committee members meet with screenwriters, producers, network pro­grammers whoever is shaping a pro­ject, to try to have some impact on the final result, Uszler said. An example of AGLA's success in such discussions is "The Cartier Affair " a recent made-for-TV movie starri~g Joan Collins and David Has­selhoff. Tipped to the script by an actor who read for the role and was offended by what he felt was anti-gay humor, AGLA met with NBC officials and the script was revised, Uszler said. . . . Producers and writers also m1tiate consultations with AGLA on their own when they are working on shows with gay themes. Uszler said that at CBS's request, AGLA reviewed an upcoming afternoon special aimed at teens, "What If I'm Gay?" I ff Uszler said AGLA's role in educating I 0 the public is especially important now I that AIDS has gripped the attention of heterosexuals and homosexuals alike.. I _ . I "The media can work to change atti- CLIP THIS AD and attach rt to I tudes and help people understand who I your next order tor s 10.00 off gays and lesbians ar~; tha~ we',~e not a I any of the following items: 1 • th:eat to them or to this society, Uszler I (Minimum Order $50) sa~~ecause the AIDS crisis has I • Letterheads •Postcards I inflamed homophobia, what goes out I • Brochures • Multipart Forms, I now is more important than ever m I • 2-Color Printing •Flyers terms of .telling the tr.uth .. about the gay • Contracts • Menus and lesbian commumty. I For Uszler the issue is not just an I • Resumes • Envelopes abstract cau~e a social challenge to be • Announcements • Invitations met. It is a per~onal mission with sting- f • Business Cards • Door ing memories attached. I Hangers • Report or Booklet He recalls how he felt as a 15-year-old . . in Milwaukee in 1968, keeping the secret I Copying • I nvorces that he was gay and watching a seg-1 MONTROSE BUSl~SS GUILD t f the police series "N.Y.P.D." MEMBERS may auballtule omneen o f °th e first shows to po'r tray gays on' I ~_ 10-t. Discount episodic television. I - - · SPEEDY "There was a lot of negativity in it," _ · U I r Said. "The whole message was I ---::_ PRINTING SERVICE: sz e . . I °"' T E ><As that gays' Jives are not worth hvmg. I F t R 1 bl 5 . remember how awf u I I ,1,e It and h ow Excealslm t Qe u'"al itey . LeMowC eC, ost deeply it impa~tthedAmGLAe.T hat fuels my I iJ.:;;;;~.,~_ 5400 BEUAIRE involvement W1 · I BLVD 1 "Young people are struggling with • h Conven1mt Southwest location I their sexuality and the media can reac I : 1>1oc• '"'' °' c......,.., •oc• .. "'~ them and teach them to have pride in I I themselves." CALL 667-7417 Call 529-8490 and I PICK UP AND DELIVERY I You will be in Next I MJ~t,E~~:~,~t?"~~J:~~~M~lf: l Week's Newspaper of l~:a~~~~':""~~~~=·~ I· Montrose L----------J. Cheese Shoppe It's C-h-e-e-z-z-z-z-e There's a world of good taste right here. we have Imported cheeses such as French Brie to Danish Halvartl, to all-American favorites. There's a wide variety to choose from and we'll cut your selection to order. And you can taste before you buy, right here at Kroger. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 Officials Warn AIDS is sex. "I don't think that's too much to ask of our children, and if memory serves me, it once was the norm," he said. "To paraphrase Lee Iacocca, 'If you have a monogamous relationship, keep it; if you don't, get one."' Not 'Somebody Else's Problem' By Larry Doyle UPI Science Writer CHICAGO-AIDS education efforts that focus on specific groups or areas are dangerous because they allow most people to think of the deadly disease as "somebody else's problem, not mine," top health officials warned Tuesday. Any person, even someone from a small isolated community, is at risk for contracting acquired immune defi­ciency syndrome if they engage in any of the high-risk behaviors that can spread the AIDS virus, said Surgeon General C. Everett Koop at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association. "This is no longer an exclusive club," he said. More than 700 public health officials and educators from around the country gathered to hear Koop and other health officials discuss appropriate commun­ity responses to the AIDS epidemic. Koop warned health officials from smaller communities where AIDS has not yet become a problem that denial is not an appropriate response. "The disease of AIDS is no longer pos­sibly headed in your direction," he said. "It probably has already arrived." Dr. Mervyn Silverman, former direc­tor of the San Francisco Public Health Department and now president of the American Foundation for AIDS Research, added that denial can take the form of believing the disease is con­fined to particular groups, and that media coverage of the disease has often strengthened that belief. "It's too easy for people to say 'it's somebody else's problem, not mine," he said. Silverman said he was most con­cerned about recent reports attributing heterosexual transmission of AIDS to sex with prostitutes. Many women and men may continue to engage in high risk sexual activity thinking they do not belong to the same social group, he said. "But 1 have it on very good evidence, from electron microscopy and what not, that the virus does not know whether University Students Can Buy Condoms With Meal Card SEATI'LE (UPI)-Students at the Uni­versity of Washington can now pur­chase condoms with their meal cards. The campus convenience store, run by the University's Housing and Food Ser­vice Department, received its first case of condoms last month and has sold 42 of the 50 boxes. "They'll stay there until we're asked to have them removed," campus food service Director Joe Xavier said recently. "Right now, no one has said anything." The store doesn't take cash. Pur­chases must be made through the "A La Carde" program, in which students put money into a fund that is accessed through their dorm meal card. This is the first time condoms have been sold at the convenience store, called Governor Stevens' Pantry after the first governor of the Washington­Oregon Territory, Xavier said. "It's a health issue," he said. "I think throughout the country there's AIDS awareness. I'm sure that's the reason," he said. you are paying for it or not," Silverman said. "It's not who you are but what you do." Koop said many people seem aware of some high risk activities and not others. Efforts to educate the public about what high risk activities to avoid must also be free of scientific jargon they may not understand or which may distance them from the problem, said Dr. June Osborn, dean of the school of public health at the University of Michigan. "Phrases like 'exchange of bodily fluids' mean precious little to most peo­ple," she said. "And if they do mean anything, they mean things like sweat." Health experts say the virus that causes AIDS is spread through blood and semen, most often through intimate sexual contact or the sharing of needles, such as is done by intravenous drug users. Koop said the threat to heterosexuals is real, and that monogamous relation­ships or chastity must be considered the best methods of preventing further spread of the AIDS virus. He said there is nothing wrong with teaching children to appreciate mono­gamous relationships or to abstain from But Koop said that children and adults cannot be expected to always fol­low this advice, and must be educated about other safe sex practices, such as the use of condoms. "A condom will not provide 100 per­cent protection; few things in life do," Koop said. • Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose Sexual Healthy sex is good for ~our mental well-being. Play Safe. A Public Service Message from J O.E., a Private Organization MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES may be made Tuesday & Thursday 8-9pm, Friday & Saturday 11 pm- 1:30am, Sunday 6-9pm. THERE ARE RESTRICTIONS. Memberships are.limited to reasonably­attractive out-of-the-closet liberated adult gay men who are secure with their sexuality. We discriminate on the basis that new members must be in reasonable condition for their body type and (even more important) that they possess a mental attitude that will contribute to the overall atmosphere at J.O E. J.O.E. meets at the COTTAGE PLAYHOUSE at 611 PACIFIC (look for the Play Safe Flag). APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Leland Doesn't Like Gorbachev's Idea By United Press International National black leaders April 18 scoffed at Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's suggestion to create separate states for minorities as a means of solving racial problems in the United States. Gorbachev made the suggestion to visiting congressmen, according to The New York Times, as he spoke out against U.S. interference in Soviet human rights practices. Rep. Mickey Leland, D-Texas, a black mem her of the Moscow delegation, said he found the Soviet leader's comment "somewhat offensive." Leland, who's Congressional distreict includes Mont­rose, said he expressed his feeling to Gorbachev as he left the Kremlin meet­ing room where Gorbachev spoke. NAACP Executive Director Ben­jamin Hooks said such a proposal would mean "separate states for Italians, for those with French backgrounds, from Asia, people from all the other countries in the world. Then we wouldn't have a United States." "The NAACP has always pushed for integratinn " said Jim Williams, a spo­kesman for the NAACP at its national headquarters in Baltimore. "Certainly Mr. Gorbachev does not know the nature of this country. Under no possi­ble circumstances would we consider (a separate state for blacks.)" Williams said Gorbachev's remarks "show a lack of understanding a star­tling lack of knowledge about black aspirations in this country." The Rev. Jesse Jackson said he would contact the Soviet ambassador.while in New York to register a complaint about Gorbachev's statement. "It's insensitive to black people and it misrepresents the plurality of the Amer­ican people," Jackson said following a meeting of Operation Push in Chicago. The Rev. Leon Sullivan of Philadel­phia, author of the Sullivan Principles for companies doing business in South Africa, said segregated states would Mexico Considers Closing Commercial Blood Banks MEXICO CITY (UPI)-Health Minister Guillermo Soberon announced Tuesday a series of proposals, including closing down commercial blood banks, to com- , bat the spread of AIDS in Mexico. "If preventive measures are not taken, there could be a total of 20,000 to 30,000 cases by 1991," Soberon said. "We are at an opportune moment to pre­vent the transmission of the virus and reduce the risk of this highly lethal dis­ease." Health Ministry statistics say 407 cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome have been reported in Mexico since the first case was recorded in 1981. The number of cases has approximately doubled every year. Soberon said a series of proposals pending approval by Congress would set up the National Commission for the Prevention of AIDS, with a budget of $500,000 for the remainder of 1987. "The proposal would also prohibit the sale of blood and plasma from the 110 (commercial) blood banks throughout the country," Soberon said. "If this modification of the General Health Law is approved, (blood) donations will be strictly voluntary or from families." violate the spirit of the Constitution. "America belongs to all of us," he said. "It is a nation comprised of an amalgamation of persons from around the earth. And in America, there is no time for separation. This is a time for unity within a single nation, in accor­dance with our Bill of Rights. So I take I . (Gorbachev's statement) with a grain of salt." Rep. Norman Dicks, D-Wash., told the Times that Gorbachev prefaced the comment by saying the United States often criticizes the Soviet Union but is not "self-critical." Dicks said the Soviet leader noted ~. crul)'t4E ~ ~ ')00-· ll\-. ··WlfftOYT~ w~~? Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups ••'Death-In' Demonstration There will be a .. Death-In .. demonstration on the lawn area of Houston City Hall on Monday. April 27. beginning at 8:00 p.m. According to organizers. the purpose of the demonstration is 00to find out when and how the city, county and state governments are going to take act ion to assist in the AIDS epidemic ... The first half-hour will be a silent protest as participants will lie down as 1n death on the lawn area in front of city hall. The end of the demonstration will include prepared state­ments to the city, county and state governments by designated speakers including people with AIDS. ••integrity to Hold Memorial Service Integrity/ Houston, a ministry of gay and lesbian Episcopalians and friends, will have a celebration of the Holy Eucharist in memory of those who have died of AIDS. The service will be held Monday, April 27 at Autry House, 6265 S. Main, at 7:30 p.m. The group invites people concerned about the AIDS crisis, those involved in AIDS ministries, and anyone who has lost a friend to AIDS. There will be a Book of Remembrance in which names of friends who have died from AIDS will be recorded. A reception will follow the service For more information, call 666-4536. .. NA Group Announces Meeting Time The White Rabbit Group of Narcotics Anonymous, Houston's only Gay• Lesbian NA meeting, 1s now meeting from 6:30 pm -7:45 p.m. Sundays The group meets at the Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd. Suite 201 Narcotics Anonymous 1s a non-profit society or fellowship of men and women for whom drugs have become a problem. The only requirement for membership 1s a desire to stop using. .. Business Guild Meeting The Greater Montrose Business Guild (GMBG) will hold a general meeting at the Houston Entrepreneurs Center, 600 West Gray, on West Gray on Wednesday, April 29, 7:00 p.m. The night's act1v1ties include a business fair. a potluck dinner and the guild's bi-annual auction which caps off its Spring membership drive Members and guests are invited to bring a dish, set up exh1b1ts, and bid on items donated by guild members Highlights of t,he evening include a presentation by Sistersong of their latest song 00Non-Prof1t Prophet .. that the Soviet system of nominally autonomous republics was based on eth­nic background and culture. Dicks, who consulted notes made during the meet­ing, quoted Gorbachev as saying: "We have respect for our nationalities in this country. Why don't you have these auto­nomous areas?" The Smoking and Drinking Chimp Goes Cold Turkey COLUMBUS, Ohio (UPI)-Sam, the chimpanzee that hangs out at a bar, smokes and drinks, will be going cold turkey for six weeks while he undergoes tests and his owner answers to cruelty to animal charger.O Sam, a 16-year-old chimp, was removed last week from his cage next to the Old Train Stop Inn in Foster and brought to the Ohio State University Laboratory Animal Center for examination. Authorities took possession of the animal after an animal rights activist complained that Sam's quarters were filthy, that he was not properly fed and that he smoked and drank. The com­plaint said the chimpanzee was loaded with coffee and cigarettes to get going in the mornings. Law enforcement officers said Sam also was allowed to smoke and drink alcohol to entertain patrons of the bar owned by Kenneth Harris, who is charged with cruelty to animals. Fred Cornhill, chairman of the Insti­tutional Laboratory Animal Care and Use Committee at Ohio State, said Sam will be in quarantine for at least six weeks. He will be given three physical examinations, dental examinations, blood tests and tests for tuberculosis. "He will recieve the same kind .of treatment a human would receive," said Comhill. Cigarettes and alcohol are off the menu, he said. "We will be alert for any problems of withdrawal," Comhill said. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 Secular Humanism or Surging Hormones? Commentary by Arnold Sawislak UPI Senior Editor WASHINGTON-President Reagan, we are told, thinks "value-free" educa­tion may be to blame for the Marines who allegedly let Russian spies into the U.S. Embassy in Moscow in return for sex with Russian women. As Reagan explained his theory, the ·Soviet espionage coup may be traceable to the failure of American schools in recent years to teach the difference between right and wrong. Fashionable as it may be to bash the schools for everything that goes wrong in our society, this is one case that can't reasonably be blamed on liberal educa­tion policies. The problem here is much more likely to have been surging hor­mones rather than secular humanism. The situation, after all, is not exactly new. Some might date it back to Sam­son's encounter with Delilah, and the president himself ought to remember the bedroom exploits of Mata Hari dur­ing World War I, when he was a boy. The point is that the link between sex and espionage didn't start with permis­iiive education and can't really be blamed on the liberals. Nor is there very convincing evidence that what might be called "value­packed" education will keep strapping young men from losing their heads when confronted by the opportunity for easy sex. A case in point from occupied Japan just after World War II: a 19-year-old soldier, the product of a strict home and old-fashioned schooling, sat through an Army venereal disease training film showing in the most clinical details the results of sex without precautions, went to town on his first weekend pass and returned with what developed into a raging dose of gonorrhea. "Didn't you see the film?" he was asked. "Didn't you see the box of con­doms in the orderly room when you picked up your pass?" "No," he replied. "I closed my eyes when that picture started and didn't open 'em 'ti! I got to town." The Moscow case was more serious (we are told some Russians probably died as a result of what the KGB agents found in the embassy), but the point is similar it probably will take more than stern warnings to keep young people from making mistakes, particularly about sex. That is not to say, however, that the In Montros e, Neady Everyone Reads the Voice BETTER LAWilS & CjARDEilS Total lawn maintenance Commercial~ Residential • Ldndscdpe • Trnsh Removdl • Chimne4 Sweep • Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN problem can be simply solved by keep­ing lonely, single Marines out of tempta­tion's way. Perilous and imperfect as the world is, it seems prudent to find effective ways to tighten up security at embassies. to do as well. The idea of leaving youngsters, Marines or not, apparently in sole charge of as sensitive a place as a U.S. embassy at any time seems to be a dan­gerous practice. The State Department does have its own security force and maybe it ought to be on duty too during the long cold Moscow nights. For example, the proposal to assign only married Marines to embassy guard duty seems to be based on the shaky premise that married men can't be led astray. Don't bet the plans for the secret weapon on it. The publicity given the Moscow case, which has deeply chagrined and embar­rassed the proud Marine Corps, proba­bly will have a bracing effect on that organization, but it seems clear the State Department has some reforming We're Houston's Largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice. We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewhere around $6,000,000 weekly on the things we buy-clothes, partying at night, apartments, curs.ond repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. (Yes, that's S6 million weekly.) Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask-by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 for ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY Herr·s how we h9ured the figures Oase d1str1bu11on 10.000 copies Ft1d.1y 15000 copies Tuesday lemporarily suspended ) Assumed · PHS on·· rate factor 2 8 Thus estimated S2~~e~s::'e:~g~o;.,;~~~5~ ~1~1:,w~61~~=1~~~!~t11~;,~ a5s~~e i~~;e~e_:;~~Q us spends THESE FIGURES HAVE BEEN ADJUSTED FROM EARLIER PUBLISHED FIGURES WHICH HAO ALSO REFLECTED THE TUESDAY EDITION THESE FIGURES REFLECT ONLY THE FRIDAY EDITION Play ball! This weekend, the Montrose Softball League summer season begins. Opening ceremonies are Sunday, 12:30pm, at Lawrence Field in the Heights. APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Last weekend, all six Houston teams, and 12 out-of-town teams, competed m the annual Lone Star Classic, which was won impressively by the Montrose Mining Company team. The Kansas City stuff captured 2nd place in the double-elimination tourna­ment. The photos on this page are from last weekend's tournament. 14 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 FEIFFER® ll/A~tJ ~I1 ~ c~ 1€ ... - Reagan Expands 'War on Drugs' By Tamara Henry WASHINGTON (UPI)-The energetic rock group, The Jets, vaulted across a federal building stage singing an upbeat slogan, "Be Smart! Don't Start!" urging pre-teens not to drink, the start of a new anti-drug campaign. The kick-off for the renewed cam­paign resembled a rock concert at the health department's main building aud­itorium. Teens wearing red-and-white T-shirts screamed and applauded as The Jets danced across the stage sing­ing the slogan. The Health and Human Services Department and the White House's Office for Drug Abuse Policy said Wed­nesday the goal of the new national effort is to prevent 8- to 12-year-olds from using alcohol by reaching them before they face increased peer and societal pressures to drink. "Getting all segments of society involved to bring the message of the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse to young people is precisely what the presi- --- --- - - ..J dent and first lady had in mind when they declared their war on drugs," said department chief of staff Thomas Burke. Last year, the Reagans personally led an intensified campaign against teen­age drug and alcohol abuse, and Con­gress swiftly passed legislation beefing up drug enforcement and education pro­grams. Nancy Reagan has for years campaigned to persuade teenagers to refuse drugs and alcohol. "We know that younger and younger children are getting involved with pro­ducts that have direct health conse­quences," Burke said. "Time and again, alcohol is the deadly first step in a pro­cess that often leads to marijuana, cocaine and other lethal drugs." Dr. Donald MacDonald, a pediatri­cian who heads the White House office. said more than one-third of the nation's teenagers 4.6 million experience serious alcohol-related problems. He said the average age of first use of alcohol is 12.3 years and by age 13, 30 percent of boys and 22 percent of girls drink on a regular basis. The consequences of alcohol use by youth, said MacDonald, include other drug use, truancy, school failure, van­dalism, petty theft and pregnancy. He said 50 percent of teenage auto acci­dents are attributed to drunken driving and 50 percent to 65 percent of all teen­age suicides involve alcohol use. The campaign includes a 4 -minute music video with The Jets, television and radio public service announce­ments and a children's booklet that gives the facts on the social and physi­cal consequences of drinking, sugges­tions on handling peer pressure to drink or use drugs and ways to say no. The material, developed by the Child­ren's Television Workshop, also includes a parents' handbook that cov­ers strategies for helping children and a teachers' guide that suggests classroom activities to help students resist peer pressures. New AIDS Drug Under Investigation By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON-Scientists are inves­tigating a possible new anti-AIDS drug that is based on part of the body's fat metabolism, appears to boost immune function and causes no side effects. The experimental drug, AL-721, is based on liposomes, minute fatty dro­plets circulating in plasma that help remove cholesterol from cell mem­branes. In laboratory dish experiments, scientists found synthetic liposomes were able to inactivate the AIDS virus, HIV or human immunodeficiency virus, by disrupting the process by which it binds to the host cell. When given to a small group of patients with lymph gland swelling and other mild symptoms of HIV infection, AL-721 boosted part of their immune function. The patients experienced no improvement in symptoms, but also had no side effects. "It's different," Dr. Michael H. Grieco, chief of the division of allergy, clinical immunology and infectious dis­eases at St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York, said of the drug. The drug was investigated as a possi­ble way to halt the progression of AIDS virus infection to symptoms or full­blown disease. Other drugs are also being tested for this purpose. The only drug on the market for treat­ment of AIDS is AZT, or azidothymi­dine. Studies shown AZT prolonged the lives and reduced symptoms of some patients taking it it, but the drug causes severe side effects. "AZT is clearly effective, but it's toxic," Grieco said. "This (AL-721) is likely to be a nontoxic drug and from that point of view, it appears warranted to pursue." In the early study, seven patients with lymphadenopathy syndrome received the drug for two months. The syndrome is marked by swollen lymph nodes, night sweats, fever and reduc­tion in immune function and is consi­dered a possible precursor to AIDS-related complex, which has more severe symptoms, and full-blown AIDS. Six of the patients experienced improved immune function as mea­sured by blood tests, the St. Luke's team reported. Cells taken from blood sam­ples a lso showed less virus content. The patients were kept off the drug for two months, during which time some deterioriation was noted, Grieco said. They will receive the drug again for another two months. The St. Luke's team is also working with other centers to begin two major studies of the drug: one of patients with lymphadenopathy syndrome and another of patients with AIDS-related complex. About 250 patients will partic­ipate in each study, Grieco said. Because the drug is based on a natu­ral substance, it is unlikely to have any side effects, Grieco said. AL-721, discovered at the Weizmann Institute in Israel, stands for active lipid, plus its formulation. Arnold Lippa, president of Praxis Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Beverly Hills, Calif., which holds the license to develop the drug, the presence of virus as measured by reverse transcriptase levels in patients dropped an average of 80 percent over the two-month period. The company said the drug works apparently by altering the shape of the section of the virus that attaches to host cells. Gay and lesbian reading ~~~~~~=from============= A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS LOVE SEX ---....-............. LOVESEX: The horny relationship chronicles of Max Exander, by Max Ex ander, $7.00. Exander gives a vivid description of his personal six-month odyssey toward establishing a lasting gay relationship which incorporates safer sex. SECRET DANGERS, by John Preston, $5.00. In this latest installment of the Alex Kane series, ex-marine Kane and his young partner, Danny Fortelli, battle a world-wide terrorist ring that is using violence against gays to promote its own ends. BELDON'S CRIMES, by Robert Rein­hart, $7.00. A grisly sex murder and a homophobic job dismissal suddenly turn Dave Beldon's life upside-down. When he decides to fight for his rights, he becomes the country's most recognized gay man. But soon the question arises: Will Dave Beldon ultimately be the vic­tor - or victim of the three-ring.media circus that surrounds him? A new and original novel from the author of A History of Shadows. "Now for my next trick ... " NOW FOR MY NEXT TRICK ... , by Michael Willhoite, $5.00. Michael Will­hoite's cartoons have been entertaining readers of The Washington Blade for many years. Now, some 80 of his best cartoons have been collected into this book. EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 .00. Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engrossing - and funniest - you'll ever read. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $12.50. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. (Oversize paperback) THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $7 .00. Burton Raider's problems begin in high school when he realizes he's in love with his friend Roman. As he gets older, the problems increase and so does the humor of his situation, in what Chris­topher Street calls "the funniest gay novel of the year." QUATREFOIL, by James Barr, $8.00. The year is 1946, and Philip Froelich faces a court martial for acting insubor­dinate to a lazy officer during the closing days of World War II. Then he meets Tim Danelaw, and soon the court mar­tial is among the least of Phillip's con­cerns .... This classic novel, first published in 1950, remains a romantic and suspense­ful read, an intelligently-written love story that gives a vivid picture of our re­cent but often-forgotten past. APRIL 24. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 1S SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7 .00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely? Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love qf his devoted friend Roy, yet instead he finds himself pursu­ing the handsome and unpredictable Markr·~~~~~~~~~~~, Long Jlln( PasSlll!I: Lins II Older Lesbians ...... ~WC9M.PU LONG TIME PASSING: Lives of Older Lesbians, edited by Marcy Adelman, $8.00. In their own words, women talk about age-related concerns: the fear of losing a lover; the experiences of being a lesbian in the 1940s and 1950s; and issues of loneliness and community. ACT WELL YOUR PART, by Don Sakers, $5.00. When Keith Graff moves with his mother to a new town, he feels like the new kid who doesn't fit in. Then he joins his high school's drama club and meets the boyishly cute Bran Daven­port ... REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $5 00. The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he took a gay date to his high school prom. SEX POSITIVE, by Larry Uhrig, $7.00. Many religious leaders have distorted Biblical passages to condemn homosex­uality. Herc Uhrig fights back, discuss­ing positive Biblical views of same-sex relationships, and arguing that sexuality and spirituality arc closely linked. THE SPARTAN, by Don Harrison, $6.00. In the days of the first Olympics, gay relationships were a common and valued part of life. The Spartan tells the story of a young athlete and his adven­tures in love and war, providing a vivid picture of classical Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our history. A BLACK GAY ANTHOLOGY I IN THE LIFE I ri_....~- 1·u ~:· EOfTED IY JOSE~ .~····· 'Hf"°°°'TION l'I' S'l'l\IESTER IN THE LIFE: A black gay anthology, edited by Joseph Beam, $8.00. When Joseph Beam became frustrated that so little gay male literature spoke to him as a black gay man, he decided to do some­thing about It The result is this an­thology, m which 29 contributors, through 'tones, essays, verse and art­work, have made heard the voice of a too-o£ten silent minority THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE, by Heinz Heger, $6.00. Thousands of gays were thrown into Nazi concentration camps for the crime of homosexuality. Heinz Heger is the only one ever to have told his story. Here is a chilling recollection of one of the most frightening chapters of our gay past. WORLDS APART, edited by Camilla Decarnin, Eric Garber and Lyn Paleo, $8.00. These collected science fiction stories present a wide array of imagina­tive characters, from a black lesbian vampire to a gay psychodroid. Here is adventure, romance, and excitement - and perhaps some genuine alternatives for our future. ------TO ORDER----- Enclosed is $ __ . Please send the books I've listed below. jAdd $1.00 postage when order­ing ;ust one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Visa and Mastercard accepted; enclose acct. no., exp. date, and signature. Send me these books: address ---------­citY--------------'- state __ zip ______ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St. Boston, MA 02118 L--------------- 16 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 The Great God Buyout The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe A consortium of .Nangelical organiza­tions announced the takeover of God yesterday. The Reverend T­Bone Pickins, head of the group, de­clined to character­ize the takeover as unfriendly. "We have the greatest re­spect for God and hope he will stay on in a consulting role so that we may util­ize his many years of management experience whenever possible," Pickins said. Pickins' group is composed of The $700 Million Club, PTP (People That Pay) and Electronic Grace. They are financing the leveraged buyout with high-yield or "junk" bonds. The new organization will be known simply as "God, Inc." "What we're basically buying," said Pickins, "is name recognition and good­will. Sure, God's been providing the best possible theological services to the pray­ing public for a couple of millennia. And he's built up an impressive clientele of faithful customers for the product. But let's face it: The times have passed him by." Pickins said the present religious management from God on down was "out of touch" with modem marketing techniques. "To force people to dress up in their best clothes and drive off to some dis­tant church or synagogue in order to get religion just doesn't make sense in this new age of fast-food outlets and catalog shopping," he said, "not when we can deliver our product to them directly in their living rooms through their tee-vee sets at no cost to them whatsoever." The merger was a surprise to most of the country, though experts generally took it calmly. "This is just the economy shaking itself out," said Professor Richard Delgado. "In the long run it will make the theological services market more efficient." Some consumers were worried, how­ever. "What about my frequent-prayer points?" complained Gretchen ·Homple of Secaucus, N.J. "For years, I've been saving them up to be redeemed, and now this." Pickins immediately issued assu­rances that God, Inc., would honor all frequent-prayer redemption commit­ments as faithfully as they had been honored in the past. Many hailed the merger. "Selling off all those churches will be a shot in the arm to the real estate market," said Hobart Gryne, head of the National Board of Realtors. "Some of them haven't changed hands in a hundred years." But hardist hit, of course, will be the current staff. Pickins said there would be no layoffs whatsoever among the heavenly host. "In fact, we're planning to give the Devil a much larger role," he said. "He's . great at bringing in revenue." But Pickins admitted there would be "some job dislocation" among the earthly sales people. "Maybe a solemn guy in a tacky robe or a black shirt might have done OK as Come out and a sales rep 50 years ago," Pickins said. "But on today's brightly lit tee-vee stage, the customer wants to see an upbeat booster in a snappy sharkskin suit with a gussied-up gal at his side. You can't make a sales pitch unless you hold your audience." The expected wholesale firings natu­rally stimulated considerable hand wringing. "Thirty-seven years minister­ing to the spiritual needs of my flock," said one Episcopalian bishop, shaking his head, "and I don't even have a golden parachute." Pickins said he sympathized with those who will be laid off. "We're hoping Congress will provide vocational retraining the way they did for the steel­workers," he said. He said there was also talk of making the Vatican an enterprise zone. "Sure, there'll be hardships," he said. "But we're talking about doubling prof­its in five years. And in return, as we say at God, Inc.,you got to look at the bottom line. Houston Gay/Lesbian Pride Week '87 JUNE 19-28 Fortunes A Shakeup on the Home Front for Pisces By Mark Orlon Your Horoscope from the Voice For Fnday evening. Apnl 24. through Fnday morning. Apnl 30. 1987 ARIES- Loving you is easier than any­thing your lover or other one will ever do again. You're sooo receptive and easy­going that you might be mistaken for a Cancerian-happy, and willing to take it as it comes. Don't let that little thing on the side interfere with all this easy loving. TAURUS-Forming a business part­nership should be done with as much care and understanding as a romantic one. The details are different, but the same rules apply. This is a good time for joint ventures. You can give a lot. GEMINI-You and a lover can't seem to reach an agreement. It might be time to take a vacation from one another. Keep­ing up the same battle can be tiresome. Separate space for a short time can do wonders. Get away and get rested. --------- CANCER-You're not usually known as the fun sign of the zodiac. You're a bit too dark and secretive for that. But let those warm beezes get to you, and if there's a party, it's at your place. Enter­tain. Envelop others with your loving soul. Bright and beautiful, yes! LEO-Old friends and close reltives will benefit from your deep, deep love. You're able to reveal very part of yourself to those you're really close to, and that allows them to do the same. The past enters into the present in a very beautiful way. VIRGO-All that detective work you've done has paid off. You've learned a lot about what you wanted, and now it's giv­ing you some pleasure. New friends and new ideas should make this spring one of more than simple content. LIBRA- When you make up your mind to do something, you do it. You're feeling strong and determined, and the thought of anyone getting in your way is unthin­kable. As long as these directions are positive, go with it. Just make sure it's worthwhile. SCORPIO-"You didn't have to be so nice; I would have loved you anyway." Don't smother your lover or other close one with too much of a good thing; we all have to come up for air sometime. Let love take its own quiet course for a while. SAGITTARIUS-You're getting things done and doing them well. Your ability to make the right decision and act on it as you should will be of great help, espe­cially if you're in a joint business venture or agreement. Pleasure comes easy; you get satisfaction. CAPRICORN-Use that imagination, and make it work. Apply the whimsical to the practical. Take a fantasy and make it into a fine reality. Someone that you care for may appear in a new and shining light. Being special can mean being open to all sorts of things. AQUARIUS-Your need for privacy and self-reflection is still strong, but at the same time an old friend may try to pull you into the social whirl. You can balance both if you remember what your priorities are. Clean up your act before you go out for auditions. PISCES-Something strange and wonderful could shake up the scene on the home front, but if you're careful, it will happen in a most delightful way. You want to do it differently than you've done it before: three ways, four ways, all kinds of ways to see it. 1987 MONTROSE VOICE APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 T'Wo Kinds of Love Sho'Wn in N e'W Films Houston Screens By Bill O'Rourke Our colleague, Scott Cutsinger, has left us. For many months now, we have missed his insightful commentaries, his sophisticated views of the films of his day. Now, we will have to miss the man himself. Farewell, Scott. Thank you for having dared to be yourself. o Waiting for the Moon Waiting for the Moon is a very comfort­ing film, given the circumstances. But those of you who like to leave your minds outside the movie theater won't like it at all. It doesn't hand you everything on a silver platter. You have to meet it part way. It cuts back and forth through time. There are a few major facts (What disease did Gertrude Stein have?) that it leaves out completely. It believes, as Gertrude did, that facts are not as important as thoughts. Even the photo­graphy itself (by Andre Neau) chooses artistically interesting angles rather than always keeping the action at the center of the screen. ·-~~ ~ Linda Hunt is Alice B. Toklas :n ' "Waiting for the Moon" At the center of Mark Magill's screen­play lies the very deep abiding love of Stein and Alice B. Toklas. It is not thought of as odd or even noteworthy that they are both women. Their love is accepted and examined for what it is-a thing of rare beauty. This is not a frenetic love. It is not the yearning chase commonly depicted in romantic movies. It is the warm hearth of the heart that surely took some years to be grown into. It is not based on the pelvis but is the vision of two who can­not put down their favorite books-each other's minds. It is not tempestuous. There are some horrible fights, but they are handled with such grace, dignity and respect for each other's feelings that they are hardly recognizable as such. What does cause Alice to throw things, and what is ultimately what the movie is about, is death. Their friend Guillaume Apollinaire (played by Jacques Boudet) flirts with death inev­itably once too often. They strike 'up an easy friendship with young Henry Hopper (Andrew McCarthy). But he is earnestly on his way to die in the Span­ish Civil War. And Gertrude ... Gertrude has been told by the doctors that she has a fatal disease. She cannot bring herself to share it with Alice. But Alice finds out. Which is worse-the dis­ease or the not telling? Director John Godmilow has assembled a perfect cast. Having once seen them in these roles, it is basically impossible to imagine anyone else doing them. Linda Hunt is Alice. Linda Bassett is Gertrude. Bruce McGill is Ernest Hemingway, a boor that they are for the moment tolerating. Bernadette Lafont is Fernande Olivier, Picasso's mistress. o Project X Project X is a different kettle of fish. This film is a little quiet and personal, too, but when measured by completely different standards. Producers Walter Parkes and Law­rence Lasker. the creators of War Linda Bassett is Gertrude Stein and Andrew McCarthy is the young American, Henry Hopper, in "Waiting for the Moon" Games, have given us a show with the same kind of excitement, fear and preoc­cupation with technology but without the scale, the overriding pace and with a much lower level of dependency on machine props. Indeed, ther are times when this movie feels very much like Crocodile Dundee. The story is about a young boy who happens to be watching a bird just before his mother is shot dead in front of him. He, understandably, grows up with a fixation on flying. He is captured by minnions of a for­eign government, which give him to a surrogate mother to learn the language. When he has, just as he is playing with a toy bird, the government takes him from his new mother. He is shipped to a secret installation where he is taught to fly-at least in a simulator. But he learns the truth. The government has only taught him so they can watch him fly as they kill him in a bizarre manner. As much as possible, the boy, Virgil­played by a chimp named Willie-is the star of the show. He is joined by lOother highly trained monkeys. You will be convinced that he is talking. I thought sure that this must be Washoe's son and was truly amazed later when I found out that Willie does not speak the language and is only doing tricks on command. When the plot requires a human pro­tagonist, we are treated to Matthew Broderick. He must really be confident of himself as an actor to ingore the ancient actor wisdom to avoid scenes with animals so far as to actually play second fiddle to one. This character is also subtly different from most of the ones he's played in the past-a little simpler, less sophisticated person. It's good to see him stretching himself, and it was believable, but he still occasion­ally moves with the grace of a cancer. He's really about my favorite of the young generation of film actors, and I hope, is destined to be with us a long time. Has anyone compared him to Cary Grant lately? The most touching point in the movie is when this once callow young man must lie to dying animal in order to save the lives of many more. Director Johnathan Kaplan has blended humor, pathos and more than a touch of high adventure into this fairly unique little move. The last movie I remember quite like this was The Day of the Dolphin, which I loved at the time, but I think that this one may be better. o Film Clips On May 7, there will be a benefit screen­ing of Lily Tomlin at the River Oaks for the Gay Political Caucus and the Mont­rose Counseling Center Women's Net­work. Thi~ film looks behind the scenes at how Lily and her playwright, Jane Wagner, created their current Broad­way hit. You may remember when the show played the Tower. It was called "Pieces in Progress." Top ticket price will be $7.50, $6.50 in advance. Masters of the Universe, coming out in August, will be the first live action movie based on a line of toys. It comes as no surprise that this special effects -• Benteen (Nick Nolte) stands with Sheriff Hank Pearson (Rip Torn), a strong father figure who has instilled in Benteen the honesty and integrity of the Texas Ranger in "Extreme Prejudice" His knowledge of the language has extravaganza will feature a true hunk, enabled him to make one friend. Will Dolph Lundren, as He-Man, but playing that friend be able to help him escape? Skeletor, and surely under miles of The boy is not human. He is a chim- makeup will be Frank Langella, a heart­panzee. Does that really make him any throb of not so long ago. less one of our brothers? The film makes a very strong statement against certain D Curtain Up types of experiments with animals. The Houston International Film Festi- Matthew Broderick stars with a trained chimpanzee in "Project X" val goes out with a bang this week. There's still time to catch some good stuff, though. And with a bang and a whiff of brimstone, My Demon Lover, reaches general distribution. As does Nick Nolte as a modern day Texas Ranger in Extreme Prejudice. A little gem called Giragge hits the Belair. Also on the art film screen (If it's not marked *, it only lasts one day!): Koyanisqatsi (River Oaks, 24)­wordless plea, music by Phillip Glass* Jack McKenney Film Festival (Adams Mark Hotel, 24, 6:30)-go underwater with the cinematographer of Jaws and The Deep. Simon of the Desert; That Obsure Object of Desire (Rice Media Center, 24)-black comedies Phantom of Paradise; The Raven (Rice MC, 25)-Paul Williams as a rock version of the Phantom of the Opera; Price, Karloff, Lugosi and Lorre team. Subway (River Oaks, 27)-punkish fairytale* · The Day the Earth Stood Still (River Oaks, 29)-Michael Rennie was therein sliver underwear. Klaatu Brada Nik to!* Class Photo (Goethe Institute, 30)­Eberhard Fechner tracks down and interviews the graduating class of 1938 from a working class high school. The Montrose Voice It's The Place to Advertise MILITARY FASHIONS FRENCH * GERMAN * IT/I.LIAN ... wwn VINTAGE * COME~~ THE FASHION ARMY AT ....• b~ ViLROY'Se t::_[X ~w-4flvw- 1 NTERNAT10NAL MILITARY SURPLUS HDQRS. MON··SAT 11 ·6 IDJWM.Clt D'I.. MCil.cfOoil.ftU.Snoot su-uu 18 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 Testing of AIDS Vaccines Set to Begin By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON-When word got out that scientists were ready to begin test· ing an AIDS vaccine in humans, volun· teers needed no special inducement to come forward. "People inquired about the trial. They are interested in it," said Dr. Adan Rios, director of medical oncology at Hous­ton's Institute for Immunological Dis­orders. "We're ready to start." Once the vaccines are determined safe, a second phase of testing will begin in slightly larger numbers of peo­ple. In this phase, more attention will be paid to efficacy. Phase 3 will enroll large numbers with the goal of observing how effective the vaccine is. "Then the interesting part will happen, which is, how do you evaluate what they (the vaccines) did? It would be wonderful if something just came out that was terrific," said Dr. Howard new virus particles. The genes responsible for these coat proteins are extracted from AIDS virus and inserted into other cells that then become factnrees for the production of more protein. An experimental vaccine produced by Oncogen, a subsidiary of Bristol· Meyers Co., is based on such proteins. The "factory" is the vaccinia virus, which is the basis for other vaccines, including the one against smallpox. played." MicroGeneSys Inc., a small firm in West Haven, Conn., programs its cell factories to produce synthetic replicas of the entire viral coat protein, accord· ing to Frank Volvovitz, president and chief executive officer. As soon as the government gives a go-aMad, Rios will supervise half of a study to determine the safety of an experimental vaccine that hopefully will be able to prevent the AIDS virus from getting a foothold in the body. But when, and whether, there will be an effective AIDS vaccine are questions no one can answer. Many scientists have predicted there will be an AIDS vaccine, though estimates of how many years it will take to develop range upwards from five to into the next century. A concern with fragment proteins is that certain areas within them change. Other areas on tie,coat remain con· stant. By using the whole coat protein as the basis for the vaccine, the worry of selecting the right fragment is elimi­nated, he said. So far, MicroGeneSys has only tested its preparation in small animals. A leading proponent of the surface protein approach is Dr. Robert Gallo, head of the NCI tumor cell biology laboratory and a discoverer of the AIDS virus. Many scientists have predicted there will be an AIDS vaccine, though esti· mates of how many years it will take to develop range upwards from five to into the next century. All realize this is a challenge unlike any other medicine has ever faced. "We're on a wartime basis," said Food and Drug Administration director Frank Young. It has been estimated more than a mil· lion people in the United States are infected with the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Although only some of them have come down with the disease and others with lesser symptoms, all are believed capa· ble of passing the virus on to others. "If the spread of the virus is not checked, the present epidemic could become a catastrophe," the National Academy of Sciences said in a report last October. The goal is to develop an agent that spurs the body's immune system into producing specialized proteins called 1antibodies that recognize and neutral­ize the AIDS virus if it enters the body later. Three teams of scientists from George Washington University and Rios' insti­tute; Oncogen Inc. of Seattle; and a party that so far has remained unpub· licized have asked the FDA for permis­sion to begin testing experimental AIDS vaccines in small groups of humans. Half a dozen others said they are in various stages of testing vaccines in animals but are not yet ready to begin human testing. All have reported having compounds that neutralize the AIDS virus when mixed in lab dishes. The first phase of human testing will concentrate on assessing side effects in small numbers of volunteers. Streicher of the National Cancer Insti­tute's tumor cell biology laboratory. The FDA is expediting its review of the vaccine test applications and expects to decide by this summer whether to approve any of the applica· tions. Scientists say the agency could act much sooner. Aside from specific technical prob­lems, of which there are many, thereare the larger questions. "Number one, this is the first time we have dealt with an infectious disease for which we do not know the natural his­tory," the FDA's Young said. "That makes it an enormous problem. Another is that the disease is chronic, not acute like the flu or pneumonia, for which there are vaccines. "We have not been successful in (vac· cinating against) chronic diseases," he said, such as herpes. "I look at myself as running a muni· tions factory," said Young. "I've got the responsibility of turning out safe and effective bullets effective in that they do the job, safe in that they don't go back up the gun barrel and blow up in your face." Proving safety is not believed to be the problem. Scientists believe a frag­ment or imitation of the AIDS virus can· not cause disease, and so far, Parisian researcher Daniel Zagury, who injected himself with a surface compound last year, ha~ suffered no ill effects. "We feel confident all the data gener· ated so far indicate this will be safe for use in humans," said Rios of the com· pound his institute and George Washington University have deve· loped. Among the vaccine approaches taken by the applicants is a compound based on fragments of the protein coat that surrounds the virus' core of nucleic acid, the stuff that carries the blueprints for ' ~ It's Springtime again and time to do those projects you've been putting off. l Call .I I ,, HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor •Roofing (All Types) • Tree & Trash Removal • Remodeling • Insulation • Sheetrock/ Painting • Trle/ Masonry • Plumbing/ Bectrical • Cabinets • Foundations Repaired • Decks/ Hat Tubs No Job Too Big or Toa Small 520-9064 Or Emergency Pager 891-4053 Oncogen found the vaccine boosted chimpanzees' immune systems, but did not prevent all those given the vaccine from becoming infected with AIDS virus. Vaccines based on surface proteins cause the body to produce antibodies that destroy the AIDS virus when mixed in test tubes. A Bristol-Meyers spokesman declined to make Dr. George Todaro, Oncogen's scientific director, available for com· ment, saying "the story has been over· But some research teams believe the focus should be on core proteins, which •D The Montrose Voice It's The Place to Advertise * * C A S A A SPECIAL HOSPITAL FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS LICENSED PROFESSIONAL STAFF ~A E IPP~ MI FOR 10: * AGGRESSIVE OR SUPPORTIVE THERAPY * SHORT & LONG TERM STAYS VISIT 1803 OLD SPANISH TRA IL OR CALL 796-CASA CASA Is Now HIRING RN ' ~/LVN's Al's Insurance Service 4108 Fannin Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 529-0140 AUTO LIABILITY SR-22 FILINGS YOUNG DRIVERS LOW DOWN PAYMENTS LIFE COMMERCIAL AUTO BONDS PROPERTY HOMEOWNERS NOTARY SERVICE "Number one, this is the first time we have dealt with an infectious disease for which we do not know the natural history," the FDA 's Young said. "That makes it an enormous problem. appear less subject to change. Gallo has said it would be reasonable to include core proteins in an AIDS vaccine for­mula, but "the first level should be the envelope protein," he said recently. However, said Dr. Prem Sarin, deputy chiefof Gallo's lab, "He may change his mind. He is doing that slowly." One of the reasons for that is the approach developed at George Washington University. The school and the Institute for Immunological Dis­orders were the first to apply to the FDA for permission to begin human testing of a vaccine. The GW vaccine is based on a syn­thetic version ofa core protein known as P-17. Sarin said the basic advantage of the P-17 approach is that this protein remains intact in different strains of the AIDS virus while there can be a lot of variety in the outside proteins. Another advantage is that the syn­thetic version can be cheaply produced without genetic engineering. Still another may be the protein's location. Research indicates P-17 is right next to the outer membrane of the virus. "That may be the reason the antibody is able to neutralize the virus," Sarin said. A different approach under develop­ment at the Wistar Institute and Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research in San Antonio, Texas, uses antibodies mimicking the AIDS virus to produce different antibodies that pre­vent the virus from locking onto its target cells in the victim. Immunologist Tranh Chan, who has led the foundation's research on this project, said his team will be ready for testing in chimps soon. But like other teams, he expects problems once it's time to expose vaccinated animals to the AIDS virus to see if the inoculation works. "The problem with challenging chimps with the virus is there's no standard. Each and every Jab uses dif­ferent dosages," he said.· That is one reason researchers believe Oncogen's vaccine stimulated the immune systems of chimps, but failed to protect against infection. The chimps were believed to have been given doses of virus much larger than the equival­ent dose any human would receive. The AIDS virus comes in more than 100 slightly different varieties. So far, the vaccines on the drawing board have reacted against only a few. Gallo said any vaccine that makes it to the public may be a combination of compounds­or one that boosts the body's immune system to fight all varieties of the virus. Another problem in animal testing is that different species respond differ­ently to the various vaccines and to the AIDS virus reinforcing scientists' belief that the only way to test any vaccine will be to test it in humans. "We should do immunological studies in man regardless of the chimp results. Certainly the chimp studies have shown no significant protection," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infec- HOUSTON ClUBBDDY CINTIR 2205 FANNIN 77002 (713) 659-4998 APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 tious Diseases. What Fauci, Young and other researche~s worry about, among every­thing else, is how to do the testing. Effectiveness will not be easy to deter­mine, since the virus remains latent in its victims and may not cause symp­toms for as many as 10 years. "I'm very concerned that the first infection in a phase 2 trial might pre­vent a phase 3 trial. People would say, 'It doesn't work,"' Dr. Thomas Curran, head of the AIDS unit at the Centers for Disease Control, said recently. According to Dr. Peter Fischinger, deputy director of the National Cancer Institute, it will boil down to vaccinat- Scientists say that to expose a vaccinated person to the virus intentionally would be unthinkable. ing peop1e at risk for the disease, coun­seling them to avoid virus exposure, and then assuming some will take risks. Effectivess will be gauged by compar­ing numbers of infections among the vaccinated group with those in a group that only believed it was vaccinated and that received the same counseling. Scientists say that to expose a vacci­nated person to the virus intentionally would be unthinkable. But Arthur Caplan, a medical ethicist and asso­ciate director of the Hastings Center, a non-profit think tank in Hastings-on­Hudson, N.Y., fears this could occur. "The fast road to scientific glory may lead people to do some funny things," he said. Like Walter Reed, who developed a treatment for yellow fever by experi­menting on himself, some researchers may intentionally expose themselves to the virus after being vaccinated, Caplan said. However, said Rios, "I think it would be a social irresponsibility to exposure yourself to the AIDS virus and expose others just because you have been vacci­nated. That would be the most outrage­ous immorality," he said. The George Washington-HD group has already recruited volunteers-12 who will be vaccinated at each institu­tion and an equal number will be used as a comparison group not receiving the vaccine. All are from high-risk groups, most are homosexual or bisexual men and none has AIDS virus antibodies, which is evidence of infection. "The first thing to understand is that this is a clinical experiment and we are not claiming that this will be a success­ful vaccine," said Rios. Even if the GW compound or another one shows some signs of effectiveness, people should not consider it a license for foolhardy behavior. Like hepatitis, for which a vaccine exists, the AIDS virus is something best avoided. Society must do everything possible to confront the issues of behavior that spreads the AIDS virus-sharing of needles, the expression of sexuality­whether a vaccine is developed or not, Rios said. "Prevention, education and dealing with our own sexuality have nothing to do with the development of the vac­cine," he said. "These are two roads run­ning parallel, but one does not depend on the other. "The vaccine for AIDS is just a frag­ment of the more important issues that have been raised by this disease, that have to do with our humanity. If we want to tie in development of a vaccine with those issues, we will make a mis­take. stJ~ cit...111~5 rrtl~ rrtl~ f A PRO MAXIMA/ FREE WEIGHT GYM S30 a mo. Gym Pass At•ailablc •HEATED POOL I SUNDECK AREA •PRIVATE TANNING ROOM •STEAM ROOM• DRY SA UNA •JACUZZI • VIDEO & TV ROOM • SNACK I VENDING AREA •SHOWERS MEMBERSHIP 10.73 6MONTHS PRIVATE DRESSING ROOMS 10.73 LARGE LOCKERS 6.50 MINI LOCKERS 5.00 12 hr. time limit MONDAY LOCKER SPECIAL NOON TO MIDNIGHT 3.00 THURSDAY 16 PRICE DAY NOON TO MIDNIGHT DRESSING ROOMS 5.36 LOCKERS 3.00 CLUB BODY CENTER PRESENTS SPLASH DAY'87 MAY 3rd lpm to 3pm FREE BBQ AND REFRESHMENTS 20 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24. 1987 Kids: Less -D-EA-L-IN-G W-ITH------. Pressure to Try Marijuana, More on Crack A DRUG OR WASHINGTON (UPI}-Many fourth-grade youngsters feel pressured to try crack or wine coolers these days but are less pushed to try pot than their counter- ALCO H 0 L parts were in 1983, a Weekly Reader drug report aimed at the pint-sized said Thursday. The percentage of children reporting "some" to "a lot" of peer pressure to try PROBLEM IS marijuana dipped from 31 percent in 1983, when the national classroom newspaper first sampled attitudes aboutdrugsanddrinking,to25percent HAR I ENOUGH in 1987, said the "The Weekly Reader National Survey on Drugs and Drink­ing." The report noted, however, that 24 percent of fourth-graders now say kids WITHOUT their age are pressured to try cocaine or crack; and 34 percent, wine coolers. The report, based on analysis of 100,000 of about 500,000 survey responses, also showed among the HirlNG lO fourth graders: Thirty-seven percent believe cigarettes are a drug, up from 20 percent four years ago. Fifty percent, up from 42percentin I EAL WITH the same period, claim beer, wine or liquor are drugs. Pressure to try beer, wine, or liquor has remained unchanged, with about36 percent these days reporting that kids H 0 MOP HO BIA their age feel "i;ome" to "a lot" of pres- ' sure to try these forms of alcohol. Fifty-five percent claimed that teach­ing kids the facts about drugs in school "works very well" as a tactic to help TO 0 them steer clear of drugs and alcohol. Terry Borton, editor-in-chief of Field Publications, the Middletown, Conn., • publisher of "Weekly Reader," said the drop in pressure to try marijuana may be linked to an increase in drug educa­tion in the schools. The report said the percentage of fourth graders reporting that school was where they learned the most about drug dangers rose from 15 percent to 32 percent over the last four years. "When we tabulated the survey four years ago, we were startled by the con­trast between the amount of pressure to try drugs that young children reported and the minimal role that school played in educating them about drug dangers," Borton said. "As a result, we increased our 'Weekly Reader' coverage of drugs. At the same time, there was a rapid growth of anti­drug information for young children provided by many other sources," he said. "Kids seem to be getting the mes­sage." A special focus of recent educational activities has been to teach youngsters about the addictive properties of so­called "gateway drugs"-cigarettes and alcohol, the report said. "This idea of gateway drugs-smoke one cigarette and you'll end up dead with a needle in your arm-can be over­stated," said Dr. Donald Ian MacDo­niild, head of the White House Drug Abuse Policy Office. "It was overstated in the 60's. But today there's plenty of responsible research to show that early use of cigarettes and alcohol is related to trou­ble with other drugs later," he said. Thomas Seese!, executive director of the National Council on Alcoholism, said media attention to the dangers of crack, a highly addictive form of cocaine, is a good thing. "The wine cooler industry needs to exercise restraint in its advertising," he said. 1-800-54-PRIDE 24 HOURS-A-DAY It takes a lot of courage to admit to a drug or alcohol problem. And once you've decided to deal with it, the last thing you need is someone passing judgment on your !if estyle. That's where we come in. We're Pride Institute, America's first in-patient drug and alcohol treatment facility run by and for lesbians and gay men. We offer a safe, confidential environment where you'll find the support, understanding and respect to effectively treat your chemical dependency. Our professional staff will do more than help you overcome your problem, they'll help you live your !if e with Pride. If you, or someone you care about has a problem with drugs or alcohol, give us a call. 1-800-54-PRIDE. Help is available 24 hours-a-day. VPRIDE INSI'I'I'UTE Recover with pride. Weinberger Approves New Military AIDS Policy By Walter Andrews WASHINGTON (UPI)-Military per­sonnel who test positive for the AIDS virus will get a chance to remain on active duty under a new Pentagon policy-but if they break the rules, they could be kicked out of the service. Among other restrictions, any of the 2.1 million uniformed personnel who test positive for the virus known as HIV will have to agree in counseling to engage in "maximum safe sex" by using condoms, officials say. Defense Secretary Caspar Wein­berger signed the new policy Wednes­day and sent his assistant secretary for health, Dr. William Mayer, to brief reporters on the nine-page guidelines. Mayer made it clear the rules will be strict. "If (a person) violates the counsel, he will be punished," Mayer said. Asked if this could mean a discharge, he replied, "Conceivably it could, yes." Authorities will be allowed to revoke security clearances and deny access to classified information to infected per­sonnel. The policy addresses the reserve forces for the first time, restricting the service of those who test positive and denying them treatment for the disease at military hospitals. The policy exempts from tests the nearly 1 million civilians working for the Defense Department, largely because the legality of the matter "is still in the courts," Mayer said, but civ­ilians might be tested in places where they would be working closely with uni­formed personnel. Infected servicemen and wom~n will be advised to inform spouses of the test results, but Mayer conceded the Pen­tagon will have no way oflegally check­ing if spouses have been informed or if condoms have been used a significant precaution because AIDS is transmitted through body fluids such as semen. More than 1. 7 million military person­nel have been tested for the AIDS virus so far and about 2,500 have tested posi­tive, nearly the same ratio appearing in the civilian population. Signs of HIV do not guarantee the person will contract the deadly acquired immune deficiency syndrome, but until now, the military branches have been free to reassign infected members as they saw fit. Mayer acknowledged "some military commanders" wanted wider powers than allowed under the new policy; government sources said earlier that many commanders wanted the power to kick out those testing positive for the virus. The new policy stipuates only that overseas personnel testing positive be reassigned to the United States, where Mayer said there are better medical facilities for monitoring patients. The policy cannot be used for any­thing but to prevent an overseas assign­ment and cannot be used to deny a promotion, Mayer said. Also, any information obtained from the testing program may not be used in a court martial or any other punishment proceeding, which means that it cannot be used alone to determine if a military person is homosexual. It is currently Pentagon policy to discharge military personnel found to be homosexuals. The new policy reaffirms the practice of rejecting recruits testing positive for HIV, Mayer said. Ofthe855,000 recruits tested since June 1985 when screening started, about 1,300 were found to have the virus. APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 er the dof The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 :-''.--­ ·-'·----'­':.-'~----- t \ 22 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 Romanovsky & Phillips: Gay Lives in Song By Steve Warren Special to the Montrose Voice We shared all our secrets Round an open fire And wrestled with each other As we wrestled with desire ... We were best friends Doing things kids do And no matter what you'd like to think We were lovers too . .. -Best Friends Ron Romanovsky and Paul Phillips sing of their lives and ours in original songs that are sometimes sincere, some­times satirical, always entertaining. After nearly six years of performing together and a few months more of being lovers, they are foremost in the very limited field of openly gay male artists on the concert and recording scene. In case anyone wanders into their show by mistake, or because a particu­lar town or campus has no other live entertainment that night-they don't just play big cities-Romanovsky and Phillips will open with a song like "Let's Flaunt It!" which leaves no doubt as the where they're coming from. Frequently sharing the bill with Jes· bian entertainers, they have always been close to the women's movement in music and politics. "Women come up to us when we perform," acacording to Paul, "and say, 'You use the word les- ~~~~-, .!11ore , than Chris Williamson .. as I grew older Still I wished to be a lady Not so I could have a man But so I could have a baby! -Womb Envy Ron was inspired early on by Holly Near, who he says "was using the L word" a lot at the time. I realized I was afraid of performing because I was gay, so maybe I wouldn't be so afraid if I performed for gay audiences." Paul claims he "came out from read­ing feminist literature, from The Female Eunuch to Lesbian Nation ... I think because I'm an effeminate man I've suffered a lot of the same oppres­sion women have, even within the gay male community." Heterosexuals aren't immune to R&P's charms either. You do'n't have to be Argentinian to enjoy Tango Argen­tino or a cat to like Cats. While their songs are never coy about gender when · a pronoun is called for, many deal with basic emotions that cross boundaries of sexual preference. Not all of us who dreaded sports as kids turned out gay (maybe 99 percent?), and that's what "Outfield Blues" is about: They split up into teams No one wanted to get with stuck me So I'm as far as I can be I'm in the out field ''Wimp," which Ron says is "tota!ly autobiographical is how I deal W1th life " could be about anyone who flu~ked out of assertiveness training: The waiter was rude and so was the food But I tipped him thirty-five percent "Lost Emotions," a song about missed opportunities ("I want to reach out for his hand/ But that would break the rule"), is so universal that they fo). low it in performance with something blatant like "He's My Lover" to get the show back on track. Ron Romanovsky, the dark-haired one who plays guitar and writes most of the songs, was raised in Pittsburgh, PA. He escaped to San Francisco shortly after high school because the fog "suited my manic depressive personal­ity so well." After Ron and his music came out he advertised "to start a gay men's music collective. I didn't know what that is musical and romantic history. "I didn't know he could sing for five months," Ron says. "I thought he just played piano." You don't notice all the details on the honeymoon. I thought you'd be taller I thought you'd be rich Romanovsky (left) and Phillips, currently touring the country, are scheduled for the University of Houston June 21 would be." Before he could find out he met blond Paul Phillips, the perfect yin for his yang. Born in New Jersey and raised in West Virginia, Paul spent three years at Wheaton, the "Christian college" Billy Graham attended. From their Paul moved to Bloomington, Ind., and then New York City. "Even there I was treated like an outsider," he recalls, "I think because I'm bubbly, not reserved." That's putting it mildly-the man could carbonate an ocean! Once they were both in San Francisco it was only matter of time until fate brought them together, one July after­noon in Golden Gate Park. "Not in the bushes," Paul hastens to add, "although I'd been to the bushes that day." They cruised each other without qui~ connecting. ... hot and cold, then cold and hot Really drags out the chase And I've begun to think Perhaps you're just a basket case -Cat and Mouse If a movie is ever made of their lives, the scene where they finally meet will be highly cinematic. Paul gets on a bus to go home. Ron jumps on his bike and starts chasing the bus. After a couple of blocks Paul gets off the bus ... The rest TOUR THE ISLANDS COZUMEL-HA WAI/­JAMAICA Tour the Islands this Summer with Us at Our fabulous pool I didn't think you'd be moody And at times such a bitch -The Prince Charming Tango Their first official appearance as Romanovsky and Phillips was at Ame­lia's, a lesbian bar. They became regu­lars at Gay Comedy Open Mike at the now-defunct Valencia Rose. "We were hanging out with all these comedians," Roy says, "so we thought we should be funny." With humorous songs and nat­urally amusing patter in between, that was no problem. Now, Ron says, "I need the audience response" that goes with comedy. "It's my need for approval. I want them going crazy after each song." "After the second month," Paul relates, "Ron was ready to do a national tour. We only had five songs." That first tour was to come about a year and a half later, in the fall of 1983. After another year Romanovsky and Phillips created the Fresh Fruit label on which they released their first album, I Thought You'd Be Taller. The record's 10 songs included "Closet Case" ("you get your kicks in tearooms from 10-minute love affairs) and "Paint by Numbers," Ron's song for Frances Farmer. Frances wasn't satisfied With all the money and the fame They tried to teach her all the rules parties! TOWfif • PlflZft lUJCUIY ArAIT,,,~fNTS THE PLACE TO LIVE THIS SUMMER Live on TV-5 in June Prices start at $355 all bills paid 621-7880 Another Fine finger Propercy But she refused to play the game In the summer of 1985 Romanovsky and Phillips went through a trial sepa­ration, which led Ron to rewrite what became the title song of their second album, Trouble in Paradise. ... love is never easy, it's a lot of give and take And it's learning to forgive each new mistake But any love worth having's gonna take some sacrifice Don't run away from trouble in paradise "The act has kept us together at times," Paul says, "but the relationship has kept the act together at times, too." Last August Paul and Ron moved to Santa Fe, NM. Paul calls it "the Marin of the desert," Marin being the mellow, artsy county North of the Golden Gate from San Francisco. "I only wish we could stay home for the next three months to enjoy it!" writes Ron, embroiled in travel plans. Just by performing together as they do Romanovsky and Phillips are mak­ing a political statement, but they don't stop there. Their songs rail against ever­ything from homophobia (" ... it seems to me my dear/ That we've seen straight folks flaunt their sexuality for years"­Homophobia) to macho militarism ("We've got a president who's so con­fused ... I He thinks . .. weapons make us strong/ ... that kind of rationale/ Will only make us dead/ I wish that when he runs the country/ He would use his other head"-Don't Use Your Penis (for a Brain)) to political correctness in the gay community ("I don't brunch on Sundays, don't own a set ofweightsr I wouldn't dream of screwing 'ti! after several dates"-What Kind of Self­Respecting Faggot Am I?) We're not coming from a place that we're a gay Everyman," Paul says, "but we've discovered a commonality." Romanovsky and Phillips have been discovered, too, by predominantly gay audiences in more than 50 cities in 31 states. The current tour can only increase the number of fans. The duo brings its tour to Houston on June 21 for a concert at the University of Houston . Lynes by Ron Roman;;vsky and Paul Phillips-Used by Permission Pla;y Safe! FLOWERS & GIFTS European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, Fruit Ir Gourmet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Stuffed Toys A"'.'ailable. 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cords Accepted Final page of the Medical Boards APRIL 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Voice Comics "Heyl Now her whole head Is out! ... This Is getting better every minute!" Vacation notes: Mr. Crosby was working on his fourth Barn-Boozier Grande at the time. 1/-J.ll ...;;.--.,;i 01917Kong f ... ur"S~. Inc Wond ,.,. r-...WO ~l ~\)t~~ ~"'\ ~~ ~ \t) S.~ \WI\ '\()\) 00\ 't£.UeJ£ t:.~\~ '[ell ~R'~· 24 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 24, 1987 Shephard Lays It on in Alley Production After Beth's and Jake's relationship has erupted into violence, Beth (protrayed by Annalee Jefferies) lands in the hospital and comforted by her brother Mike (portrayed by Greg Kean Williams) whom she barely recognizes, in the Alley Theatre's production of Sam Shephard's "A Lie of the Mind" Houston Live By Bill O'Rourke A Lie of the Mind (Alley) is one of the most accessible Sam Shepard plays I've ever seen. The audience can readily fol­low the plot and are helped along with traces of a fine sense of humor. Still, in all the wrong ways, Shepard is the American Chekov. This richly detailed play was written for the actors. That isn't surprising. Shepard is an actor. However, it is much more interesting to act in his plays than it is to watch them. Unfortunately, most of us are watching them-many more than are actually osntage. These wond­erful monologues and scenes should be relegated to the acting classrooms, with an occasional full performance in a small, out of the way theater. The audience, not being actively involved, is free to fall asleep at times without the nagging feeling that it has missed something important. The plot goes so slowly that it's easy to catch up. So slowly that I'm sure those cursed with insomnia must wonder what the point was meant to be, hurried as it is under an avalanche of droning words. This is also the longest of his plays, I'd bet. Don't expect to get home before midnight. Jake has beaten his wife senseless and left her for dead. She isn't dead, merely extensively brain damaged. She hobbles back to a close semblence to normalcy. Her mind, even given the fact that it cannot communicate well, seems to be the most tender, caring, sane one onstage. Her steadfast love for her hus­band is seen as the one true beacon of hope in this dreary world. Give me a break. He has gone into a debilitating bout of depression because of her supposed death. But by the time he can get back to her, his brother, working towards Jake's sanity, has become stranded at her house-snow and an untended leg wound from her brother's rifle. She falls in love with him instead, goes off the deep end and believes she's Marilyn Monroe (a recurring image in Shepard's plays). Love is the only thing that stands a chance of humanizing this world and even it only stands a snowball's chance in hell. Meanwhile, Jake's mother has disco­vered that her sons are never going to clean out their rooms and starts throw- Peg Glazier and Gordon Mayne in Theatre Southwest's "Deathtrap" ing things out. She eventually bums down the whole house. The Red Clay Ramblers perform the incidental music they wrote for the NYC run of this show. Quite pleasant, but often moody and mournful, country and western. Not even one of our best directors, George Anderson, aided and abetted by some of our best local actors-Smith, Bennett, Marich, Krohn and Fitzpatrick-could make this long dirge work for me. o Notes When I was in Denver recently for the fourteenth annual Imperial Court of the Rocky Mountain Empire, it was obvious that this is an election year forthat city. Mayor Frederico Pena himself attended the festivities. That had never hap­pened before. Not to be outdone, several other may­oral candidates as well as a handful of council hopefuls, attended and spoke. Sylvia Herring, a young, black may­oral candidate, came up with an inter­esting idea. She said prositution should be legalized and taxed and the proceeds used to combat AIDS. The Imperial Court system is much less elitist than it sounds. In most cities, anyone with a ticket to the coronation can vote for Emperor and Empress. It is always held in a ballroom large enough to fit in anyone who wants to come. So you aren't stuck with some hand-me­down dress rehearsal. The Next Court of the Lone Star (Houston's own) coronation will be in January. Rick Odums, whose four-year-old dance company from France are the guest aritst at this weekend's Delia Ste­wart Jazz Dance performances, is a native Houstonian and graduated from HSPVA. Don't forget this Sunday's HGO per­formance is at 7:00 p.m., not the usual 2:30 p.m. matinee. Such a wide variety of shows in town right now! The brand new World of Beauty (Stages), a reappraisal of Hair (Stages), the rarely seen treat Uncom­mon Women and Others (Main Street) and the umpteenth time through the delightful Crimes of the Heart (Theatre Suburbia). The Celebrate the Arts sampler series offers a book of coupons that can be exchanged for tickets at any of 30-some odd cultural entertainment establish­ments throughout town. Sortoflike buy­ing a flexible season's ticket to the whole city. 524-ARTS. Poets: You'll want to get five poems together to enter the Houston Poetry Fest. You can win recognition from the city as a distinguised poet and a public reading. This is actually two juried competitions-one for poets working with English and another for those molding Spanish to their liking. Info: 667-7332. Auditions: Carmine Street: three women, eight men (25-55): April 26 & 27, 7:30. Theatre Southwest, 661-9505. o Celebrate! April 28, 1813: Prince Mikkhail Kutunov, the Russian general who forced Napoleon's retreat from Moscow, had a heart attack and died while hav­ing sex with one of his soldiers. B'days: 24-Leslie Howard, Shirley MacLaine, Barbra Streisand. 25- Edward R. Murrow, Al Pacino, Talia Shire. 26-John James Audobon, Ber­nard Malamud, Jules Stein. 27-Anouk Aimee, Sandy Dennis, Sheena Easton. 28-Robert Anderson, Lionel Barry­more, Jack Nicholson. 29-Rod McKueri, Tom Ewell, Celeste Holm. 30- Alice B. Toklas, Franz Lehar, Willie Nelson. "Philosophy is language idling."­Ludwig Wittgenstein, born April 26. o Openings The Birthday Party (Actors Workshop, 24)-Harold Pinter's cruel birthday party Carolyn Dahl (Art and Fashion Insti-tute, 24)-hand painted silk work and dyed paper vessels Deathtrap (Theater Southwest, 24)­Ira Levin's witty thriller Deborah Hay Dance Co. (Diverse Works, 24) The Marriage of Figaro (Heinen, 24)­Mozart's truly funny adaptation of Beaumarchais Patio/ Porch (Houston House "Crimes of the Heart" continues its run at Theatre Suburbia Theater, 24)-wonderful two woman comedy Delia Stewart Jazz Dance Company (Tower, 24)-with special guests from Paris France: Rick Odums' Dance Explosion They're Playing Our Song (UH­University Park, 24)-the musical Mar­vin Hamlisch and Carol Bayer Sager wrote about their relationship, book by Neil Simon Billy Cobham (Rockefellers, 26)-the drummer. ONO! Dame Joan Sutherland and Luciano Pavarotti (Summit, 25)-a true summit meeting! ONO! Autograph Show and Sale (Westin Galleria Hotel, 26, 9-5)-Freebies. ONO! Pizazz (Tranquility Park, 27, noon)­Freebies. ONO! Ario Guthrie (Rockefellers, 27)­Alice's Restaurant. ONO! Kris Kristopherson (Rockefellers, 28)-Help Me (and Bobby McGee) Make it Through the Night. ONO! The Night (Blythe Spirits, 30). ONo! American Sculpture: Investigations (Davis/ McClain Gallery, 30)-works by 10 contemporary artists HCC Repertory Dance Company (HCC, Theater One, 30) Jesus Christ Superstar (Arena 30)­an innovative, updated touring p~oduc­tion by a non-Equity professional company from Connecticut Dally The 611: 50 cent draft beer Hunt Room: Happy hour and hors d'oeuvres 5-7pm Exile II: Happy hour 7am-7pm Charlie's Coffee Shop: Dinner and midnight specials Mary's: Happy hour 7am-noon (ex. Sun.), 6-Bpm (ex. weekends), 11 :30pm-12:30am Camp Closet: Open 7am (noon Sun.), happy hour opening-Bpm Most days Hunt Room: Michael Daily Friday K.J.'s: Pool tourney, 10pm Men-ergy: Amateur Male Strip 10pm Chutes: Male strip contest 11 pm Chutes: After-hours E/J's: Beer bust 4-10pm and $1 hamburgers Roosters: Fantasy in Montion dancers 10pm and midnight Dirty Sally's: "TGIF Party," 75 cent schnapps, 50 cent draft all night Heaven: After-hours Exile II: "Fiesta Extravaganza," Latin disc
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