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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 13
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 13. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/69.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 13. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/69

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 13, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/69.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_013.jpg
Transcript supersede, is to pass on to our youth through teaching the knowledge so painfully accumulated in centuries past, to add to that knowledge through research, and to use that knowledge for human good through service. We must meet the trials that lie before us with the best wisdom we can muster, and that best wisdom will keep us true to our real vocation. The South needs good educational institutions desperately, needs them now as never before. A great university is too precious to be sacrificed to the demands of the extremists of either the right or left wing groups. We must make every effort to guard our effectiveness as educational institutions, whether the threat comes from demagogues or—if you will accept the paradox—from idealists. Because of this problem of racial integration, I look to the future of the university in the South with deep concern, but also with deep faith. All around me in the Southern universities I see dedicated men of character, men who know how much they are needed in the South, men who see the worth of what they are doing, men who realize that nowhere else in America can their weight count for so much. Some able men will leave us, I know, shaking the dust off their feet as they turn away; but others will stay to see this struggle through. May I say in closing that this struggle is not ours alone, but yours too. America is one nation. What hurts a part, hurts the whole. The South today is the nation's frontier, a rich land, still unexploited. The South has a tradition and a culture that America cannot afford to lose. The South has a tremendous contribu- 11