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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 12
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 12. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/68.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 12. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/68

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 12, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/68.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_012.jpg
Transcript This last—this situation which is considered ideal by so many Americans—let me say frankly, shows no substantial signs of achievement in the state universities of the Deep South. A state institution is very close to the people of the state. In many ways this is good, for the ideal state university is delicately responsive to the varying needs of those whom it serves. At the same time, this closeness makes for effective political and social pressures which are hard to withstand. Instances of their influence come readily to mind— Bertrand Russell's being forbidden to teach in New York because of his controversial views on marriage, the forcing out of an Iowa State professor who published a factual study of the relative merits of oleomargarine and "the high-price spread," the long and painful loyalty-oath controversy at your University of California. The controversy over the integration of Southern state universities will not be settled on the university campuses alone; and the administrators of those universities must look forward to stormy years. What those who direct the course of these universities, and those who teach in them, must do is to keep their perspective with regard to this tangled question of integration. We must keep our eyes firmly fixed upon the true mission of the university. Our trinity must be teaching, research, and service. A university does not exist for the purpose of holding the line against racial mixing. Neither is its primary function to lead the campaign for integration. Its supreme obligation, which no lesser purpose must be allowed to 10