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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 11
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 11. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/67.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 11. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/67

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 11, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/67.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_011.jpg
Transcript want to turn to the broader topic of integration in all the state-supported institutions of higher learning in the South. We can be sure there will be attempts to enroll more Negroes in schools previously closed to them. The aggressive organizations pressing this campaign will not slacken their efforts. On the political scene, the Democratic Party is committed to furthering such integration, and the Republican Party cannot abandon its historic role as the defender of the rights of the individual. The Supreme Court is most unlikely to change the tenor of its decisions. As Finley Peter Dunne's Mr. Dooley observed, The Supreme Court follows the election returns." Just as certainly there will be continued Southern opposition to integration. Neither laws nor sermons nor logical arguments nor economic expediency can work a rapid change in social attitudes so deeply rooted and so charged with emotion. What will come in the next few years out of this struggle to integrate the Southern universities is difficult to predict. Many Deep South state institutions may maintain a de facto but not a de jure segregation, using social pressures to accomplish what was once accomplished by state laws. More probable is a pattern of token integration, such as now exists at the University of Mississippi and Clemson College. Most desired by liberal Negro leaders and most bitterly opposed by most of the South is full integration, with Negroes admitted freely to all universities and finding sufficient social acceptance there to lead the normal life of a college student.