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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 10
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 10. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/66.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 10. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/66

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 10, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/66.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_010.jpg
Transcript owes something to us for her own peaceful integration last month. Just how seriously have we been damaged by our crisis? It is too early to assess the cost as yet, but we know that we have been hurt. For one thing, we have been attacked consistently and almost unanimously in the national press. Some of the attacks I think have been unfair. We have made mistakes—certainly I have made mistakes; but I might remark that a sparrow caught in a badminton game is not always in the best position to make the wisest decisions. We have lost some prestige in the academic world. We have had to defend ourselves against the threat of loss of accreditation. We have lost some good faculty members, and we may lose more. We have lost some good students, and some good students who would once have come to us may not do so now. We have been turned down on some projects that we believe would otherwise have been approved. And yet, at least within the context of my own educational philosophy, we have won a notable victory. We might well have been destroyed yet we have survived. I believe we shall continue to survive, and survive as a truly strong university, not merely as the husk and shell of a university. I shall return to this point in a few moments, but first let me recapitulate. In dealing with my topic, "The University and Integration," I have tried to convey to you what has happened at the University of Mississippi, why it happened, and what some of the implications of those happenings are. Now I 8