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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 9
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 9. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/65.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 9. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/65

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 9, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/65.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_009.jpg
Transcript back not merely into injustice but into grief and agony and violence too by forcing on us laws based on the idea that man's injustice to man can be abolished overnight by police. Sambo will suffer it of course; there are not enough of him yet to do anything else. And he will endure it, absorb it and survive because he is Sambo and has that capacity; he will even beat us there because he has the capacity to endure and survive but he will be thrown back decades and what he survives to may not be worth having because by that time divided we may have lost America ... I only say that the injustice is ours, the South's. We must expiate and abolish it ourselves, alone and without help nor even advice. Thus, when the time came for Meredith to enroll at the University of Mississippi, there were many issues at stake. This was a test, and it was recognized as a test by all those concerned. Unwillingly, and almost unwittingly, our quiet, tree-shaded campus became the battleground for a decisive struggle between opposing schools of thought—ethical, political, and sociological. That battle is certainly not over; but, three weeks ago when James Meredith registered for our spring semester without the slightest appearance of an incident, I saw reason to hope that there would be no more violence over this issue on American campuses. Perhaps out of our suffering has come the wholesome determination that our experience shall not be repeated elsewhere. Possibly Clemson College