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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 8
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 8. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/64.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 8. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/64

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 8, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/64.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_008.jpg
Transcript the damned. At the end of the sermon the old farmer worked his way down to the pulpit and told the preacher he just couldn't believe the Devil would behave so. "Folks just wouldn't stand for it!" he insisted. So Mississippians believed about integration In their State—"Folks just wouldn't stand for it"—and I am convinced that much of the fury of our campus that black September night sprang from frustration, from a kind of intellectual outrage that comes when one is forced to acknowledge what he could not believe was possible. There was more involved than the question of racial integration, however. The question of States Rights enters in. "States Rights" is an increasingly important political issue in many parts of the country. In the Deep South substantial men, men of good will, men like yourselves, find it a matter of deep concern. Many citizens who would be considered very liberal on the race question are deeply concerned about the constantly decreasing role of the state in the government of its citizens. Southerners have been shaped and moulded by their history, and they are a proud people. They believe they know best how to settle their own issues, and they want no interference. Even so compassionate a man as my famous fellow-townsman William Faulkner felt this. I think the character Gavin Stevens, in Intruder in the Dust, speaks for Faulkner when he says: I'm defending Sambo from the North and East and West—the out- landers who will fling him decades