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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 7
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 7. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/63.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 7. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/63

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 7, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/63.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_007.jpg
Transcript gain, in Mississippi, it is a fact of existence. No other way of life appears acceptable. Even so, you may well ask, could not Mis- sissippians see in recent years that the advancing tide of school integration would not stop at the State's borders? Perhaps it was an unwillingness to see, yet once more the attitude was understandable. Most of the State's citizens sincerely believed that the old solution of "separate but equal' facilities would answer in Mississippi in spite of the Supreme Court's decision to the contrary In 1954, and that we needed only to upgrade our Negro schools. In consequence, since 1954 Mississippi has spent nearly twice as much money building schools for her Negro minority than for her white majority. What else was the average Mississippian to believe when he read nothing else in his newspapers, when he heard little else from his political leaders? A practical politician in the Deep South would no more advocate school integration than a candidate for mayor in your city would run on a platform advocating earthquakes. Add to this the fact that for nearly seven years after the Supreme Court decision there was no serious attempt to integrate a Mississippi school, and you can better understand how the feeling of "it can't happen here" could settle into a conviction. I am reminded of the anecdote of the old farmer who was attending his first religious revival service. The preacher was an imaginative man, and he described in dramatic detail the tortures which the Devil would inflict upon