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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 5
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 5. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/61.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 5. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/61

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 5, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/61.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_005.jpg
Transcript not permit Meredith to enroll without breaking a State law carrying a prison sentence, and they could not block his enrollment without risking imprisonment on Federal contempt charges. At one point, under provisions set forth in the State Constitution, the Board delegated certain authority to the Governor of the State to act for them. On instructions from a Federal Court they later resumed this authority, but the Governor continued to act in the case under the police powers of his office. Meredith was twice prevented from registering as a student by the Governor and once by the Lieutenant Governor. A fourth attempt was begun but was cancelled before Meredith reached the campus. Finally just before dark on Sunday, September 30, with less than one hour's notice to the University's administration, Meredith was admitted to the campus under the guard of hundreds of Federal marshals. Their arrival touched off a bloody riot which provided a Roman holiday for newspaper readers and television viewers, and which gave our University its unenviable notoriety. In the mob were some of our own students and students from at least thirteen other universities and colleges; there were Mississippians other than students, but the majority of the mob were outsiders from all over the South and Southwest. When the thousands of troops who were rushed to the scene finally quelled the riot, two men were dead, perhaps two hundred were injured, and property damage amounted to thousands of dollars. Meredith remained at the University under a heavy guard of marshals and of armed soldiers, but for weeks the campus seethed with unrest. It is quiet at Oxford now, and I pray