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The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Page 3
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Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 3. February 21, 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/59.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983. (February 21, 1963). The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 3. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/59

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983, The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams - Page 3, February 21, 1963, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/73/show/59.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The University and Integration, an address by John D. Williams
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Publisher Program For A Greater University of Mississippi
Date February 21, 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
  • Williams, J. D. (John Davis), 1902-1983
Genre (AAT)
  • speeches (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_072_003.jpg
Transcript The history of The Commonwealth Club of California, the widespread influence for good that it has, and the list of illustrious persons who have preceded me on this rostrum make me keenly aware of the honor you have done me by your invitation. At the same time, when I reflect upon the train of events that brought me to this place to speak to you on "The University and Integration/' my pride in being here is somewhat chastened. I have been given some prominence by the integration crisis at the University of Mississippi but—to recall the anecdote about the man being ridden out of town on a rail—it has been a mighty uncomfortable way to achieve the honor. The months just past have been ones of terrible stress for me, for the faculty and staff, for all those who love the University. When I consider the price that has been paid for this determined attempt to integrate the University of Mississippi and the equally determined attempt made by powerful forces to resist such integration—the cost in money, in reputation, in good will, in human suffering—I am appalled. It is not my purpose to spend the moments you have allowed me in giving just one more version of 'The Meredith Case," and yet the Meredith case is the obvious point of departure for all that I do have to say. Let me begin, then, with a swift recapitulation of the more salient facts. By Constitutional provision, the University of Mississippi is under the management and control of the Board of Trustees of State Insti- 1