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Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland
Page 4
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McFarland, John W.. Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 4. July 8, 1959. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/419.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McFarland, John W.. (July 8, 1959). Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 4. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/419

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McFarland, John W., Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 4, July 8, 1959, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/419.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McFarland, John W.
Date July 8, 1959
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 18
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_045_004.jpg
Transcript - 4 - Negroes are accorded more rights and privileges, more opportunities in the South today than ever before. In the Houston Public Schools, schools for Negro pupils receive the same priority as schools for whites, and justly so. Negro teachers are paid on the same salary scale as white teachers. Library books, equipment and supplies are allocated on the same basis to all schools. Supervisory help is provided more intensively for Negroes than for whites in order to assure that opportunities shall be at least equal for them. Unfortunately, all the talk about possible desegregation, the ruthless force of the United States Supreme Court decision, and the pressure of lawsuits and of intervention by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People -- these have intensified bitterness between the races. Although school officials continue to deal dispassionately, fairly, and impartially with all, regardless of color, it pains me to hear bitter, emotional tirades from all sides. The white person who criticizes the Negro does not help the situation. Neither does the agitator who speaks of forcing the majority to the will of the minority, or who ridicules the careful efforts of those in authority to comply with both federal and state law. It is important for business and professional men, parents, and other taxpayers to understand the unique position in which members of the Board of School Trustees are placed as responsible representatives of the entire Houston Independent School District. In this situation there is no action they can take that will be universally applauded or accepted by all segments of the population of the School District. They are not free to do just whatever they desire to do. They are bound by federal law, state law, school regulations and their all-consuming concern for the education and welfare of over 160,000 boys and girls of all races. It is extremely important that if and when desegregation occurs, it should occur gradually. In such a situation, many believe that every effort should be made to insure that there would remain some schools where white students j can attend school solely with other white students and other schools where Negro I students can attend school solely with Negro students. There are indications that Ithe great majority of Negro students will prefer to remain in their present excellent schools and that the great majority of white students will prefer to remain in Ischools attended solely by white students. On May 17, 1954, according to the Court, "separate but equal" ceased to be law; the invalidity of state-enforced racial segregation in the public schools became the "law of the Land". Then the implementing decision was handed down on May 31, 1955. Basic to the Courtfs opinion was a recognition of the wide variety of local school problems involved. Because of this the Federal district courts were told to look at the integration plans separately submitted by the authorities of each school district against which enforcement actions should be brought, not to achieve uniformity but rather to achieve good faith implementation of the desegregation principle as applied to local facts. "Equitable principles, " traditionally characterized by practical flexibility and by a facility for adjusting and reconciling public and private needs, were to be the guide. The Court called for a "prompt and reasonable start" toward compliance with the new constitutional requirement, to be then carried out "with all deliberate speed. " Federal district courts were to retain jurisdiction of cases before them throughout the implementation process, as a check upon compliance.