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Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland
Page 3
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McFarland, John W.. Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 3. July 8, 1959. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/418.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McFarland, John W.. (July 8, 1959). Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 3. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/418

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McFarland, John W., Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 3, July 8, 1959, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/418.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McFarland, John W.
Date July 8, 1959
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 18
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_045_003.jpg
Transcript - 3 - was made by a Negro student in one of our Negro high schools. Also, the highest test score in Chemistry was made by a Negro student in one of our Negro schools. Special "major works" classes are provided for capable students in the high schools for Negroes in order to enable the capable students to proceed at a pace based on their own ability. The laboratory facilities in Science for the Negro students in Houston are unexcelled in that all of their high schools are new and equipped with modern science equipment. Now prejudice is a strong and insidious pressure in the emotional life of any individual. Prejudice literally means judgment before the facts. Webster's New International Dictionary defines prejudice as "preconceived judgment or opinion; leaning toward one side of a question from other considerations than those belonging to it; prepossession; unreasonable predilection for, or objection against, anything; especially an opinion or leaning adverse to anything without just grounds or before sufficient knowledge. " The insidious part about prejudice is that it is difficult for the person affected by the prejudice to recognize the nature of his own prejudice. When one is controlled byj3rejudicef he. makftfi certain decisions on the basis of emotions I rather than on the basis of reasoning. In the segregation question, prejudices ^*""' ■ II ^ III! li^^Mi *~ ■ «Hll^^—^■^^■^W~» ~l ■■■■!■■! . ^J exist on both sides. Some Negroes and some who are agitating for quick integration manifest strong prejudices against whites. This is unfortunate. It helps anyone if he can recognize his prejudices. For instances, I admit that I am deeply and severely prejudiced against the University of Oklahoma Sooners. The reason for my prejudice is clear. I spent five miserable, hot, sweaty, humiliating October Saturday afternoons in the Cotton Bowl at Dallas suffering as the University of Oklahoma defeated, one way or another, my beloved Texas Longhorns. One year the Longhorns scored early, played a wonderful game, led most of the game, but lost at the end by a close score. Another year they were swept along by a tidal wave of Oklahoma power, mostly in the form of lads of Breckenridpfe. Texa.a^ Stamford, Texa.st and ff^rrx Naw Mexico^ In this game the score was 45-0, and in the last few minutes a Texas back tried to punt on last down from deep in his own territory and just dropped the ball on the ground. All of these things occurred while I lived just a few miles from the Red River and was surrounded by neighbors and associates who saw nothing wrong in a good Texan1 s attending Oklahoma University. Three members of my school board in Amarillo were from the University of Oklahoma. I had to sit at the head table at the Amarillo High School football banquet and hear Bud Wilkinson claim that he I didn't proselyte or recruit Texas boys for his teams. "They just simply want to attend a good university," he said. He had the nerve to say that. Can you understand why I would develop a prejudice against the Oklahoma Sooners? The nice part about my prejudice against the Oklahoma Sooners is that several more glorious and decisive victories like the Longhorns1 triumphant, crushing, and thorough win, 15- 14, last year, will resolve my prejudice. You see, I used to be prejudiced against the Texas Aggies, but I have ncthing but good will now for those lovable, tame, well-disciplined boys from the farm. c Unfortunately prejudices about Negroes are not as simple, as light, or as easily resolved as those football rivalries.