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Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland
Page 2
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McFarland, John W.. Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 2. July 8, 1959. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/417.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McFarland, John W.. (July 8, 1959). Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 2. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/417

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McFarland, John W., Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 2, July 8, 1959, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/417.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McFarland, John W.
Date July 8, 1959
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 18
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_045_002.jpg
Transcript Y - 2 - their schools. They are planning and administering a highly effective educational program for the boys and girls. A very high percentage of the graduates of these five high schools will go to college or university for advanced study* Many will command good jobs on the basis of the skills developed in the Vocational Education and Business Education courses taken in these schools. It is doubtful if these Negro youth could have obtained as effective an education in an integrated school. It is doubtful if there is any other high school anywhere that could provide as effective education for the Negro youth of the City of Houston as Jack Yates High School, Booker T. Washington High School, Worthing High School, Wheatley High School, and Kashmere Gardens High School. There are many school systems in other parts of the United States which are not providing as well for the educational needs of Negro children as the Houston Independent School District is. This statement would be true of many school districts which claim to be integrated. Many of these schools are not providing as effectively for the education of Negro children and youth of their cities as Houston is for the Negro students of Houston. It may well be questioned whether it would not be good to allow a little more time for this difficult transitional process in school districts like ours where the Negro student receives the full measure of his educational rights and opportunities. There are five modern senior-high-school for Negroes in the Houston Independent School District^ These buildings cost approximately $2,000,000 each. The new Booker T, Washington building has an air-conditioned auditorium, the first one to be built in Houston. This high school, and each of the other four senior high schools for Negroes, has an excellent library, good classroom facilities, a sanitary and attractive and comfortable cafeteria and kitchen, the finest high-school physical science laboratories in the State of Texas, extensive and efficient vocational shop facilities and homemaking laboratories, and wonderful facilities for music and art. The aggregate enrollment in the Negro high schools for the school year just passed was 4,753 students. Another 7,266 junior-high- school students are enrolled in eight Negro junior high schools. /A * . f There were 1. 145 graduates of our Negro high schools this June and of jthia-JUimber 69» 8% are planning to attend college This is a slightly higher percentage than the 66% of white graduates from our schools whn plan fo att^rf college, and considerably higher than the percentage of high-school graduates \ nationwide who attend college. Seventy-one of the Negro graduates received I substantial scholarships to attend college. The aggregate amount of these I scholarships for Negro students was $146,369. In addition to the usual academic courses offered to all the students in Houston, Negro students have available to them vocational courses in the areas of Auto Mechanics, Cosmetology, Industrial Arts, Homemaking, Trade Dress Making and Trade Cooking, Vocational Agriculture, Radio and Electricity, and Trade Metals. Negro students in Houston are receiving unusually good instruction in Mathematics, Foreign Languages, and the Sciences. The Negro teachers in Science particularly have done an excellent job. Although the test results indicate that generally the Negro studentsfall below the students in the white schools, some of the Negro students^ have made excellent grades in the city-wide testing program. For example, a year ago the highest individual test score in Physics