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Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland
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McFarland, John W.. Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 1. July 8, 1959. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/416.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McFarland, John W.. (July 8, 1959). Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 1. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/416

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McFarland, John W., Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland - Page 1, July 8, 1959, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/422/show/416.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Problems Incident to Integration in Our Schools by Dr. John W. McFarland
Creator (LCNAF)
  • McFarland, John W.
Date July 8, 1959
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 18
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
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  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_045_001.jpg
Transcript Kiwanis Club July 8, 1959 / Problems Incident to Integration in Cur Schools by Dr. John \V. McFarland, Superintendent Houston Independent School District It is frankly with some reluctance that I discuss publicly a problem so controversial and so fraught with emotion as the problem of segregation or desegregation in the Houston Public Schools. I hope that you will understand the difficulties of my discussing this problem while my employers, the Board of School Trustees, continue to study and to seek a satisfactory solution for this most vexing of problems, and while a law suit, styled Delores Ross v®. Petersen and others, is pending in the Federal District Court. It would, of course, be impossible anyway for me to provide in 20 minutes a complete and comprehensive discussion of this complicated question. It may be that a few observations concerning the education of Negroes in Houston will be of interest to Kiwanians today, however. One of the difficulties of this problem of segregation or desegregation lies in the fact that it is an emotional problem rather than a rational problem. The basic issue has been clouded by sympathy and prejudice for or against the Southern Negro, and sympathy and prejudice for or against the Southern way of life. To understand the problem of segregation or desegregation in the schools, one must go all the way back to the War Between the States, in which the Southern States fought a courageous and honorable, but losing, war. Following this war, the defeated Confederates were subjected to the most degrading peace terms in modern history and to a bitter Reconstruction Period in which the Southern Negroes unwittingly and against their will were used as a means of punishing, humiliating, and retarding the Southern States. It was during the latter half of the nineteenth century that the "separate but equal" school system, based upon the judicial doctrine of the Plessy vs. Ferguson case, was set up in the South. Unfortunately the segregated school system provided "separate but unequal" school facilities in many instances. At one time, this may have been true even in the Houston Independent School District. I do not know. But, the fact remains that today Negro students do enjoy equal school facilities in the segregated system of the Houston Independent School District -- equal in terms of quality of instruction; equal in terms of courses offered; equal in terms of quality of school buildings and classrooms; equal in terms of equipment, of supplies, and of facilities provided; equal in terms of educational opportunities. Chief Justice Earl Warren and his associates on the United States Supreme Court are not really familiar with the quality of education specially designed for the Negro youth that can be afforded in high schools like our Phillis Wheatley High School, Jack Yates High School, Booker T. Washington High School, Worthing High School, and Kashmere Gardens High School. I doubt if the leaders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People are really familiar with the dedicated work that is being done in these schools. Each of them is headed by a distinguished and experienced Negro educator as principal. These men are working conscientiously for the best interests of the boys and girls of