Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Summary statement regarding desegregating the University of Houston
Page 1
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Summary statement regarding desegregating the University of Houston - Page 1. October 1969. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/268/show/264.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1969). Summary statement regarding desegregating the University of Houston - Page 1. University of Houston Integration Records. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/268/show/264

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Summary statement regarding desegregating the University of Houston - Page 1, October 1969, University of Houston Integration Records, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ/item/268/show/264.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Summary statement regarding desegregating the University of Houston
Date October 1969
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Segregation in higher education--United States
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • documents (object genre)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1985-005, Box 29, Folder 19
Original Collection President's Office Records
Digital Collection University of Houston Integration Records
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/integ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name integ_201401_063_001.jpg
Transcript SUMMARY STATEMENT RE DESEGREGATING THE UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON The Board of Regents of the University of Houston has never felt it necessary, or appropriate, to issue a formal resolution "desegregating" the University or to attach any fanfare to the admission of Negroes or other minority groups to the student body, faculty or staff. Instead, the regents, in close consultation with the administration, began a broad study of how to achieve the admission and/or hiring of all qualified applicants without reference to race, creed, or color* As a result, Negro students were admitted to graduate programs in 1962 and at the undergraduate level a year later. Negroes were attending very few institutions of higher learning in the state or region at the time, and virtually no private universities because of extreme differentials in tuition and fees. Nevertheless, there were no problems connected with the admission and acceptance of black students at the University of Houston, and they have increased steadily in number since 1962. The rate of increase jumped most perceptibly in 1963, when the institution became part of the state system of higher education with a resulting six-fold decrease in tuition. The University of Houston has always had minority employees outside the faculty; the number and relative responsibility of these men and women has grown over the years. Along with most colleges and universities in America, the University has never been able to attract a substantial number of qualified Negro faculty members or administrators. In spite of the continuing short supply of, and increasing competition for, such persons, however, we have recruited considerably more of them in the past several years. October, 1969 A \ Al/