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HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 24, July 2018
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Tibbits, Randy. HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 24, July 2018. 2018-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hetag/item/26.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tibbits, Randy. (2018-07). HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 24, July 2018. Houston Earlier Texas Art Group (HETAG) Newsletters. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hetag/item/26

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tibbits, Randy, HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 24, July 2018, 2018-07, Houston Earlier Texas Art Group (HETAG) Newsletters, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hetag/item/26.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 24, July 2018
Creator
  • Tibbits, Randy
Contributor
  • Houston Earlier Texas Art Group
Date July 2018
Language English
Subject
  • Art
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 987443698
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Performing & Visual Arts Research Collection
  • Houston Earlier Texas Art Group (HETAG) Newsletters
Donor Tibbits, Randy
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
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  • Houston Earlier Texas Art Group
Transcript HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Bill Condon Guanajuato 1957 ink and wash on paper HETAG Newsletter No 24, July 2018 The Travels with Bill Issue Here it is July, and Houston is HOT! And it’s been hot for months already. And it will be hot for months more. Big things are about to start happening in the world of Earlier Houston Art (see announcements later in this newsletter), but that’s next month. For now we’re in the fiery clutches of that dispiriting nightmare, the summer doldrums. If you’re like me, and you haven’t managed to escape to some cool, enlivening mountain eyrie, then you’re probably dreaming about one. So this issue of the HETAG Newsletter is dedicated to summer escapes. But not just any escapes, and not by ourselves. We’re traveling this summer with the Earlier Houston Artist, Bill Condon (1923-1998), and there couldn’t be a better traveling companion when it comes to seeing the world through art. So pack your bags, visually anyway, and let’s go. But be sure to get back by August. You won’t want to miss the exhibitions and openings and lectures and panels for what will be the best opportunity there’s ever been to see, and learn to love, Houston-made art – hundreds of paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures and ceramics, from the 1850s onward. And we’ll be all rested and refreshed after our little July getaway with Bill. Bill Condon Paris 1963 (l) and Piazza San Marco, Venice 1965 (r) HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Houston Art History Notes: Travels with Bill Bill Condon all dressed up (l) and with Stella Sullivan (r) Houston architect/artist William J. (Bill) Condon (1923-1998) loved to travel, and he loved to send postcards home, but not just any postcards – he made his own, using the cardboard inserts that came in his laundered shirts back then. He’d cut them into postcard size blanks before he left and then work them up into place-specific cards as he went along. Bill Condon Guanajuato 1962 postcard So if you were a friend of this Bill, you might open your mailbox to find a wonderful little work of art greeting you from wherever he was at the moment. He must have sent thousands of them, and you can still find them around Houston, framed and ready to fill a small space on your wall – or big space if you’re lucky enough to get a group – never mind that they’re addressed to someone else. Bill Condon Lucerne, Switzerland 1967 (l), Riesenrad, Vienna 1962 (c), Amsterdam 1960 (r) HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Bill Condon Taxco 1964 Condon was a native Houstonian. After serving in the U.S. Army for four years during World War II, he got a degree in architecture from Rice University, and he was a practicing architect throughout his working life. He seems to have retained a real affection for his alma mater since he made many images of the Rice U. campus over the years. Bill Condon Rice Institute No. 4 34th Annual Houston Artists Exhibition, museum purchase prize, 1959 It’s easy to see the architect’s eye in his work, but art was at least as much a part of him as architecture. Fellow architect and close friend, Ralph A. Anderson, Jr., said of Condon’s work: “He seems to be saying that, no matter how pretentious man is in what he builds, no matter how ugly, an other-worldly beauty exists there in spite of everything.” Bill Condon Hong Kong 1961 (l); Denver, Colorado 1969 (c); Zurich, Switzerland n.d. (r) HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Upcoming exhibitions: SOUTH AND NORTH OF THE BORDER A pair of exhibitions sponsored by HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group and CASETA: Center for the Advancement and Study of Early Texas Art in conjunction with The Heritage Society and Houston Public Library Thomas Flintoff Court House, Houston 1852 (l) and Robert Preusser Untitled (Buildings at Night) 1938 (r) SOUTH AND NORTH OF THE BORDER: Houston Paints Houston On view at The Heritage Society Museum August 16 – November 24, 2018 (Reception Thursday, August 16, 2018, details to follow.) and SOUTH AND NORTH OF THE BORDER: Houston Paints Mexico On view at the Julia Ideson Building Exhibition Hall, Houston Public Library August 25 – November 10, 2018 (Reception Thursday, August 30, 2018, details to follow.) Together the two exhibitions will include more than 140 works created by Houston artists over 130 years, showing the evolving vision of our own city and of our closest neighbor to the south. Emma Richardson Cherry [Mexican Market] c1905 (l) and Lucas Johnson Esperanza de las Flores 1971 (r) Read a preview these shows in the Houston Press, by Susie Tommaney. HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group In addition to South and North of the Border, a number of other exhibitions and events around the city throughout the fall of 2018 will add up to a FESTIVAL OF EARLIER HOUSTON ART, making this the best opportunity in a lifetime to see the full range of Houston art from the 1850 to the present. These are some of the delights in store for us: Sense of Home: The Art of Richard Stout Coming in early October to the O’Kane Gallery, University of Houston Downwtown This exhibition of the art of Houston artist Richard Stout, curated by HETAGer Sarah Beth Wilson McKeel, Curator of Exhibitions and Collections at the Art Museum of Southeast Texas, opened in Beaumont last year, and will be at the O’Kane Gallery, University of Houston Downtown. On Saturday, September 22, Richard Stout will be in conversation about his life and work with Alison de Lima Greene, The Isabel Brown Wilson Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art at The Museum of Fine Arts Houston. (Details to follow.) Richard Stout with his painting Blue Gibraltar 1957 at the opening of Sense of Home: The Art of Richard Stout at the Art Museum of Southeast Texas in Beaumont, September 2017. Art of Elinor Evans: Learning to See Fondren Library, Rice University An exhibition featuring selections from the Woodson Research Center collection of Elinor Evans, award-winning artist and Rice University Architecture Department design instructor, including woven baskets and hangings, delicate collages, and a "portfolio of ideas" in mixed media on paper. HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group In conjunction with the publication of Collision: The Contemporary Art Scene in Houston, 1972-1985 (Texas A&M University Press, forthcoming) by Pete Gershon: Contemporary Artists in Houston from the Collections of William J. Hill and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Leslie and Brad Bucher Gallery, the Glassell School of Art August 3 –November 11, 2018 (Reception Friday, September 7.) Featuring works by John Alexander, The Art Guys, Bob Camblin, Charlotte Cosgrove and Helen Orman, Ibsen Espada, Ezekiel Gibbs, Joseph Glasco, Allan Hacklin, Joseph Havel, Rachel Hecker, Dorothy Hood, Terrell James, Luis Jimenez, Sharon Kopriva, Jesse Lott, Jim Love, Suzanne Manns, MANUAL, Jesus Moroles, Kermit Oliver, Basilios Poulous, Forrest Prince, Philip Renteria, Bertram Samples, Gael Stack, Earl Staley, Richard Stout, James Surls, Michael Tracy, Arthur Turner, Dick Wray, and Sandie Zilker. Organized by Pete Gershon. Sunday, September 23, 1pm: Collision book launch event, Favrot Auditorium, Glassell School of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Houston 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm: Collision presentation by Pete Gershon 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm: Panel discussion: Pete Gershon, Alison de Lima Greene, John Alexander, Bert Samples, Arthur Turner. 3:15 pm – 3:20pm: Group photo of ‘70s/’80s HTX artists on atrium steps by George Hixson. 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm: Book signing with writer and participating artists Sunday, September 30, 1pm: Contemporary Houston Artists film festival, Favrot Auditorium 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm: Dorothy Hood: The Color of Life (1985, 30 min.) 1:30 pm – 2:00 pm: Jesse Lott: Art and Community (2017, 30 min, Cressandra Thibodeux, dir.) 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm: vintage Super8 home movies with live narration by artist Earl Staley 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm: Jackelope (1975, 60 min., Ken Harrison, director) HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Creating Collision: The Contemporary Art Scene in Houston, 1972 - 1985 Hirsch Library, Museum of Fine Arts Houston August 28 – December 15, 2018 Featuring rare and unusual ephemera from the collection of the Hirsch Library including materials published by the B&E Holdings Firm, H.J. Bott, Lawndale Annex, Louisiana Gallery, Midtown Art Center, Moody Gallery, Robinson Galleries, Studio One Alternative Space, and Texas Gallery. Thursday, October 4, 7pm, Hirsch Library Conversation with Pete Gershon, Terrell James, and Clint Willour focusing on the research Behind ‘Collision’ and James’s experience working for the Texas Project of the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art from 1979 to 1984. Sharon Kopriva: Early Works The Jung Center, Houston, TX October 2 – 30, 2018 Saturday, October 6, 5 - 7pm: Opening reception Tuesday, October 9, 7pm: Discussion with artist Sharon Kopriva about the work in the show. From elsewhere around the state: We’ve received word that Michael Grauer, Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs/Curator of Art and Western Heritage at Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in Canyon, will be leaving for new opportunities in September. He will become McCasland Chair of Cowboy Culture and Curator of Western Art at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. Michael has been a cornerstone figure in the world of Early Texas Art for the entire 31 years he’s been at PPHM, and before. He’s curated ETA exhibitions too numerous to list, including the recent Jose Arpa: A Spanish Painter in Texas and the groundbreaking Texas Impressionism: Branding with Brushstroke and Color, 1885-1935, to name just two. He has also presented many, many entertaining and eye-opening talks around Texas and beyond, including several at annual symposia of CASETA: Center for the Advancement and Study of Early Texas Art. And he’s been the guiding eye in building the largest publicly held collection of Early Texas Art, at PPHM – including massive holdings by his art hero, Frank Reaugh. ETA is much the better for Michael’s contributions over the decades. He will be sorely missed by those of us who have come to know and love him over the years, but he’s not going far and he promises to keep in touch. All the best, Michael. We are forever grateful for you and all you’ve done. HETAGers who Sponsored the 2018 CASETA Symposium This letter is for YOU! Minnette Boesel, Bonnie Campbell, Leila & Henri Gadbois, Paulette Harbin, Christian Kelleher & Theresa Clarke, Tom & Tam Kiehnhoff, Rex Koontz, Sandra Lloyd, Sarah Beth Wilson & Joseph McKeel, Larry Martin, Bobbie & John Nau, JoAnn & Bill Owens, Trilla & Bob Pando, Stan Price & Clay Huffard, Linda & Bill Reaves, Sally Reynolds & Associates, Shirley E. Rose, Kay Sheffield, Richard Stout, Randy Tibbits & Rick Bebermeyer, Earl Weed, and Mary Ellen & Tom Whitworth. Dick Rembrandt [Houston Skyline] watercolor c.1960s HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Next HETAG meeting, Sunday, September 16, 2018, 2-4 p.m. Helen and Erik Sprohge have invited us to visit their home, and Erik’s studio, for a look at the art of Erik and his artist father, Paul Sprohge. This is a treasure trove of Houston art going back into the 1930s, when the Sprohge family came to Houston from Latvia by way of Berlin. You will see work by both Erik and Paul in the exhibition South and North of the Border: Houston Paints Mexico, but you’ll see much more of it on our visit with the Sprohges. Don’t miss it. Details to follow. Paul Sprohge Untitled [Mexican Market] 1963 The mission of HETAG is to illuminate Houston's art history by providing viewing opportunities for art, by supporting and doing research on the artists and art communities working in Houston through the years, and by spreading the word. Back issues of the HETAG Newsletter are available via the University of Houston Libraries Digital Library https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hetag Randy Tibbits, coordinator HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group tibbits@rice.edu Bill Condon Patzcuaro 1964 (l) and Cemetery, Saltillo 1960 (r)
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