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HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 28, December 2018
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Tibbits, Randy. HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 28, December 2018. 2018-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hetag/item/20.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tibbits, Randy. (2018-12). HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 28, December 2018. Houston Earlier Texas Art Group (HETAG) Newsletters. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hetag/item/20

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tibbits, Randy, HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 28, December 2018, 2018-12, Houston Earlier Texas Art Group (HETAG) Newsletters, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hetag/item/20.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Newsletter, No. 28, December 2018
Creator
  • Tibbits, Randy
Contributor
  • Houston Earlier Texas Art Group
Date December 2018
Language English
Subject
  • Art
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 987443698
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Performing & Visual Arts Research Collection
  • Houston Earlier Texas Art Group (HETAG) Newsletters
Donor Tibbits, Randy
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Rights Holder
  • Houston Earlier Texas Art Group
Transcript HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Kathleen Blackshear HETAG Newsletter No 28, December 2018 One of the many nice things about having artist friends, especially this time of year, is sometimes receiving Holiday Cards they’ve made themselves. In this issue of the newsletter, some of them are passing their greetings along to HETAG. We’ll also take a look back at the FESTIVAL OF EARLIER HOUSTON ART, Fall 2018. What a Festival it’s been! Things going on on all over town from July to January, accompanied by enthusiastic response and great press coverage. Though the Festival is winding down, a few exhibitions and events are continuing into the New Year. And even after the Festival ends, there are lots of exciting opportunities in the planning stage - a HETAG tour of Glenwood Cemetery on a beautiful spring afternoon; a visit to the undisputed biggest and best collection of art by DuBose Gallery artists; and more. As you bid farewell to 2018, get ready for another spectacular HETAG year in 2019. HAPPY HOLIDAYS! Stella Sullivan (l); Henri Gadbois (r). HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group The Festival of Earlier Houston Art: A Look Back The Festival of Earlier Houston Art, Fall 2018, started a couple of years ago as the hope that a number of projected exhibitions and events might be brought to fruition at the same time, to give Houstonians a comprehensive look at our own art from the past – and at a level of critical mass that would generate the excitement and publicity to get the word out that we actually do have an art history, right here in Houston. Though the chances of success seemed improbable then, thanks to the hard work and cooperation of many individuals and institutions, The Festival happened. Through the fall, we’ve been able to see and learn about Houston’s own art – made by our own artists, or those who spent some time among us – from the 1850s to the 1980s. The intention was not to dishonor in any way the amazing, courageous artists who are even now making art in Houston every day. But rather to bolster their efforts, and to enrich the experience of being Houstonians for all of us, by showing that art has been made here for as long as there has been a Houston – art still worth seeing, but that we seldom have the chance to see as we rush into the future and continue the process of becoming World Class. Just because you’re World Class, doesn’t mean you have to turn your back on your past. I think someone sometime said, “You can’t know where you’re going if you don’t know where you came from.” The Festival has given us a better idea of where we came from, at least where our art is concerned. Thanks are due to all those who helped make The Festival a reality (even to those who didn’t necessarily know they were doing so). Scores of individuals contributed to this success in larger and smaller ways – too many to list, but they all have the satisfaction of knowing that they were part of something important. A number of organizations also participated, including: The Heritage Society; The Ideson Gallery, Houston Public Library; The O’Kane Gallery, University of Houston Downtown; Reaves/Foltz Gallery; Deborah Colton Gallery; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The Bryan Museum, Galveston; The Rosenberg Library, Galveston; The Panhandle Plains Historical Museum, Canyon; CASETA: Center for the Advancement and Study of Early Texas Art; and, of course, HETAG: Houston Earlier Texas Art Group. And a special thanks to the press organizations that helped spread the word: Houston Chronicle, Houston Press, Glasstire, Culturemap, Arts & Culture Texas, and others. The Festival of Earlier Houston Art is coming to a close, but let’s keep the fervor for Earlier Houston Art going into the future! HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Here are some of the high spots of the Festival of Earlier Houston Art, Fall 2018: SOUTH AND NORTH OF THE BORDER: HOUSTON PAINTS HOUSTON The Heritage Society 1100 Bagby Street Houston, Texas 77002 Until November 24, 2018 Extended thru January 12, 2019 More than 80 works created by Houston artists from the 1850s to the 1980s showing the evolving vision of the city. There will be a closing party for “Houston Paints Houston” on Thursday, January 10, 2019, 6-8 pm, at The Heritage Society. Details to follow. Read more about it: Rediscover Our City's Lost History Through the Eyes of Early Houston Artists, by Susie Tommaney in the Houston Press. SOUTH AND NORTH OF THE BORDER: HOUSTON PAINTS MEXICO The Julia Ideson Building, Houston Public Library 550 McKinney Street Houston, Texas 77002 Closed November 10, 2018 More than 60 works created by Houston artists during the first three quarters of the 20th Century, exploring our relationship to our closest neighbor to the south. The two exhibitions are presented by The Heritage Society, Houston Public Library, CASETA: Center for the Advancement and Study of Early Texas Art, and HETAG: Houston Earlier Texas Art Group. A joint catalog has been published and is free when you visit either exhibition. Read more about it: Art Daybook: ‘Angels’ from memories of Mexico, by Molly Glentzer in the Houston Chronicle. HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Kindred Spirits: Louise Nevelson & Dorothy Hood Until February 3, 2019 Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Celebrating Louise Nevelson and Dorothy Hood, independent women ardently committed to assuming leading roles at the forefront of the American vanguard. Coming of age as artists in the 1940s—Nevelson in New York, and Hood in Mexico and Texas—they frequently drew inspiration from common sources, balancing abstraction and content as they synthesized the lessons of Cubism and Surrealism into the bold, new language of mid-century Modernism. LECTURE Two Women Who Shaped Houston’s Avant-Garde: Louise Nevelson & Dorothy Hood Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, 6:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m. Law Building, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston In celebration of Kindred Spirits: Louise Nevelson & Dorothy Hood, this panel discussion delves into the unique contributions Nevelson and Hood made to the evolution of American Modernism. Read and hear more about it: Kindred Spirits mini-catalog Modern Art Notes Podcast interview with curator Alison de Lima Greene. After years of second-tier status, female artists are getting attention in Houston museums, by Molly Glentzer in the Houston Chronicle. Hood and Nevelson: Pioneering Artists Who (Probably) Never Met, Until Now, by Susie Toomney in the Houston Press. Kindred Spirits Without Categories: Nevelson and Hood in Houston, by Eric Miller on Urban Art & Antiques. Dorothy Hood Untitled watercolor c1950s? HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Cosmic Attraction: Works by Dorothy Hood and Don Redman Basilios Poulos: A Moment in Time Dick Wray: Select Works Deborah Colton Gallery Until January 5, 2019 Houston Foundations III: Identifiably Houston Deborah Colton Gallery Closed October 27, 2018 Late 20th Century Houston art from several Houston artists. Read more about it: Art Galleries: See the flames of ‘Icarus’, by Molly Glentzer in the Houston Chronicle. Earl Staley Icarus 1982 (l); Pete Gershon Collision Texas A&M Univ. Press 2018 (r) Contemporary Artists in Houston from the Collections of William J. Hill and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Leslie and Brad Bucher Gallery, the Glassell School of Art Until November 11, 2018 Works from the 1970s thru the 1990s, presented in conjunction with the publication of Collision: The Contemporary Art Scene in Houston, 1972-1985, by Pete Gershon (Texas A&M University Press, Sept. 2018) Read more about it: Art Daybook: a 'Landscape with Skull', by Molly Glentzer in the Houston Chronicle. Collision: A Conversation With Pete Gershon About His New Book on Houston’s Art History, by Christina Rees on Glasstire. Fire, Wild Parties and Rule-Bending Museums Shaped Houston's Art, by Susie Toomney in the Houston Press. HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Mid-Century Mod in Motion: Stella Sullivan: A Retrospective. Transformed: Jack Boynton and Richard Stout Reaves-Foltz Fine Art Closed November 3, 2018 Read more about it: Stella Sullivan and the Art of Seeing, by Robert Boyd on Glasstire. “Stella Sullivan, 1924-2017,” on Glasstire. Mid-century Modernist Stella Sullivan, a bridge to Houston's art history, has died, by Molly Glentzer in the Houston Chronicle. Stella Sullivan The Chinese Lamp c1961 (l); Richard Stout Nest 1958 (r). Sense of Home: The Art of Richard Stout O’Kane Gallery, University of Houston Downtown Closed December 6, 2018 A major traveling retrospective of the work of Houston artist Richard Stout, including works from the 1950s to the present. Read more about it: O'Kane Gallery Hosts Art of Richard Stout, by Mike Emery on UHD News. Veteran Houston artists reconsidered in spate of shows, by Molly Glentzer in the Houston Chronicle. A Sense of Home: The Art of Richard Stout, by Hannah Dean on Glasstire. HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Meetings: Many thanks to HETAGers Lisa Lipscomb and Brian Hill for giving us a festive Holiday Party at their home and for sharing their wonderful collection of Earlier Houston Art and Houston Ephemera with us. What a great way to round out the HETAG year. Let’s make our next meeting the closing party for HOUSTON PAINTS HOUSTON at The Heritage Society, Thursday, January 10, 2019, 6-9 pm. We’ll be celebrating the exhibition, and also toasting our departed friend, Henri Gadbois, who will be there with us through his art, which is such an important part of the exhibition. RSVP to rsvp@heritagesociety.org Texas Art Videos: The next best thing to looking at Early Texas Art may be looking at videos about Early Texas Art. Here are a couple of video resources you might want to check out: CASETA Symposia videos – If you have attended the annual CASETA Symposia, you know what a wealth of knowledge our speakers bring to us. Now all the speaker sessions for 2014-2018 are available via the CASETA Website. That’s 30-plus hours of the best talks by the most knowledgeable scholars, collectors and dealers in the field of Early Texas Art. Watch them for the first time, or again, and learn all about our fabulous Texas art. Art This Week – I have only recently become aware of this amazing resource for videos of art-related topics at Texas museums. It’s not all Earlier Houston, or even Early Texas, but there’s lots of content related to our focus, including the recent series at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, on three Houston women important in our art history: Ima Hogg, Audrey Jones Beck and Annette Finnigan, about whom we’ll be learning more when we do our HETAG tour of Glenwood Cemetery in the spring. Check out Art This Week. HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group Carden Bailey Chartres Cathedral 1938(l); Forrest Bess c1938 (c); Kathleen Blackshear (r). The mission of HETAG is to illuminate Houston's art history by providing viewing opportunities for art, by supporting and doing research on the artists and art communities working in Houston through the years, and by spreading the word. Back issues of the HETAG Newsletter are available via the University of Houston Libraries Digital Library https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hetag Randy Tibbits, coordinator HETAG: The Houston Earlier Texas Art Group tibbits@rice.edu Erik Sprohge Winter Dance 2015 (l); Bill Condon 1966 (r).
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