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Street Wize Magazine Issue 8, with "Exclusive: HAWK's Last Interview"
Page 3
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Street Wize Magazine. Street Wize Magazine Issue 8, with "Exclusive: HAWK's Last Interview" - Page 3. approximately 2006. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hawk/item/29/show/17.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Street Wize Magazine. (approximately 2006). Street Wize Magazine Issue 8, with "Exclusive: HAWK's Last Interview" - Page 3. HAWK Photographs and Memorabilia. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hawk/item/29/show/17

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Street Wize Magazine, Street Wize Magazine Issue 8, with "Exclusive: HAWK's Last Interview" - Page 3, approximately 2006, HAWK Photographs and Memorabilia, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hawk/item/29/show/17.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Street Wize Magazine Issue 8, with "Exclusive: HAWK's Last Interview"
Creator (Local)
  • Street Wize Magazine
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Austin, Texas
Date approximately 2006
Donor Meshah Hawkins
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Hip-hop--Texas--Houston
  • Rap (Music)--Texas--Houston
  • Rap musicians--Texas--Houston
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • H.A.W.K. (Rapper)
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2010-024, Box 1, Folder 2
Original Collection HAWK Papers
Digital Collection HAWK Photographs and Memorabilia
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/hawk
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note High-resolution images are not available for this item.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name hawk_201402_003_005.jpg
Transcript Police Brutality All across America there are court cases involving wrongful death suits, law enforcement corruption, and police brutality. Many of these acts of violence are carried out against people of color. In several instances, officers involved in cold-blooded murder are put on administrative leave, placed on probation, acquitted, or let off easy without facing a murder trial or prison time. There was an interesting article in USA today written by Rob Sewell entitled "USA Today: Police Brutality and the Electric Chair". The following is an excerpt from the article: The last defiant words of Gary Graham, who was executed by lethal injection in Texas, was to accuse his captors of "the systematic state murder of black people". This murder not only takes place on death row but in the cities of America. James Quarks, a market trader in Baltimore, Maryland, was cutting open a box, when a group of police officers, guns drawn, responding to a call, came racing up in their squad cars. The young Black man looked up from his work to see what was happening. Not realising that the knife was still in his hand, the police order him to drop it. As he does so, the cops open fire and shoot him dead. Like the Rodney King case in Los Angeles, this murder was caught on video and the police, who tried to cover it up, were caught red handed. In the Bronx, N.Y., Amadou Diallo, another street vendor, was murdered by police in cold blood. Four cops - members of the deadly Street Crime Unit - fired 41 shots at unarmed Diallo, pumping him with 19 bullets. The police officers were later acquitted, giving a clear signal that there is a state-sanctioned "open season" for police to kill unarmed blacks. There were similar incidents in Riverside, California, Charlotte, N.C., and on the New Jersey Turnpike. In Philadelphia, four more African Americans have been killed by police this year. For instance, in January, Erin Forbes was shot in the heart by Lower Merion police as he returned home from his night job. He was surrounded by at least five fully-armed officers, yet the police story was that he threatened them with a stick. These are not isolated incidents. Police brutality is an everyday occurrence in the United States. Trigger-happy cops have murdered countless individuals, overwhelmingly none-whites. Many of the victims of police brutality have committed no crimes, but are attacked because they are Black, Latino, poor or young. Millions are victims of racial harassment and discrimination and African Americans continue to feel the full weight of racist US capitalism upon their backs. The rage that rises up in Black Americans and minorities against their conditions is met with the repression of the racist police force and the legal system. Increasingly, in Black and Latino communities, people fear the police more than the criminals. This is directly due to the repressive actions of the police themselves, who are getting away with murder - literally. The police act in a brutal fashion because they have been given the green light from the higher-ups in the police department to commit all manner of murder and mayhem in the name of the "war on crime." State violence is reaching new heights in the United States. There are over two million people in prison - the highest incarceration rate in the world. While the USA has only 5% of the world's total population, it has 25% of the world's prisoners. Despite their minority status, Blacks and Latinos account for 56% of death-row inmates and 42% of executions! Without doubt a sizeable proportion have been framed by police in an ongoing effort to break the resistance within the African American and Latino communities. The answer of the American ruling class to the discontent within society has always been increased repression, building more jails, increased use of the death- penalty, acts of racist violence, and the elimination of democratic rights. However, the murderous practices of the police are not confined to minorities. Violence is being used against workers on strike, against peaceful protesters, against immigrants and against innocent people of all races and nationalities that stand up for their rights. While fighting against the injustices of capitalism, the police brutality, racism, at the end of the day, only though the socialist transformation of society can these evils be eliminated once and for all. Disclaimer: The views and opinions stated in this article are not necessarily the views and opinions of the Street Wize Magazine staff or affiliates.