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Gay Austin, December 1977
File 017
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Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 017. 1977-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/987.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-12). Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 017. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/987

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 017, 1977-12, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/987.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, December 1977
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript FOR SEXUALLY ACTIVE PEOPLE IT'S A FACT For sexually active people it's a fact of life—venereal diseases (VD) are communicable diseases almost always spread by sexual contact. Because of the stigma attached to VD and other sexually transmitted diseases, myths and misinformation about them have flourished. When VD is transmitted through gay sex the stigma is compounded. The result is that myths and taboos are magnified, misinformation a- bounds and often moralistic literature exaggerates the consequences of infection to the point of frustrating enjoyment of a full, sexual life. Sexually active people do face an increased risk of infection. But, caring for those we love includes the responsibility of knowing about sexually transmitted diseases and preventing their spread. By dealing with VD openly, we can soon eliminate the stigma associated with getting and passing VD and eventually eradicate the diseases and the risk of having sex FACTS ABOUT GONORRHEA (CLAP) Gonorrhea is the most common venereal disease and can be spread by oral, anal, and vaginal sex. Initially it is a localized infection caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae which can affect the penis, rectum, mouth, or vagina. PENILE GONORRHEA Within 3 to 7 days after contact a thick whitish-yellow discharge (pus) will occur from the penis accompanied by mild to intense burning during urination. However, sometimes a drip without burning or burning without a drip will occur. Any unusual or intense penile discharge or sensation merits a visit to a physician or local VD clinic. Untreated penile gonorrhea can cause a form of prostatitis (painful inflammation of the prostate gland), penile stricture (scarred tissue inside the penis) and gonococcal epididymitis (intense irritation and swelling of the balls). ANAL GONORRHEA Many people with anal gonorrhea have no symptoms. When symptoms are noted, they include a mucous anal discharge, intense rectal irritation, tenesmus (a feeling of incomplete evacuation after defecation) and burning during defecation or intercourse. Anal contacts of persons with penile gonorrhea should recieve treatment since medical examination may not detect rectal gonorrhea and cultures are not dependable from this site. PHARYNGEAL GONORRHEA (GONORRHEA OF THE THROAT) Symptoms of oral gonorrhea usually are not noticed. If symptoms are noted, they include a mild to severe sore throat, fever and chills. VAGINAL GONORRHEA As with anal and pharyngeal gonorrhea, those with vaginal gonorrhea may not have symptoms or they may be so slight that they go unnoticed. Occasionally, a vaginal discharge and a burning sensation during urination may occur. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GONORRHEA Gonorrhea can be diagnosed by microscopic analysis of specimens taken from the urethra of the penis. A culture test is the best method for detecting anal, pharyngeal and vaginal gonorrhea. When visiting a physician or VD clinic for a check-up you should ask for a rectal and throat culture if you think you need them. They are not usually performed routinely. An accurate blood test has not been developed to detect gonorrhea. Gonorrhea may be completely and quickly cured without lasting damage to the body if diagnosed and treated soon after infection. Self-treatment is dangerous and often ineffective. Inadequate treatment may cause symptoms to disappear even though the disease can still be spread to others as well as cause severe bodily damage. Treatment with left-over antibiotics may contribute to the development of a resistant strain of gonorrhea. CONTROLLING THE SPREAD OF GONORRHEA The gonorrhea epidemic could be ended if all sexually active people will do two things: 1) get an examination every 90 days, or whenever symptoms are noticed, and 2) if you are treated be responsible for insuring that all your sex partners within the past 30 days receive an examination. Sex could be a whole lot better if the worry of gonorrhea was removed . For more information concerning the control of venereal diseases in the gay community, please call the City Health Department VD Services at 476-1168, or call Gay Community Services at 477- 6699 between the hours of 6 and 10 p.m. Examinations, treatment and VD control services may be confidentially obtained free of charge at the Austin Health Department, 1313 Sabine, across from Brackenridge Hospital. Hours: Mon. 1-4 p.m. Tues. 1-4 and 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wed. 8-11 a.m. Thurs. 8-11 a.m. Fri. 8-11 a.m. and 1-3 p.m. Club Austin sponsors free blood tests on the third friday of every month from 10-12 p.m. Membership is not necessary for admittance to the test. Tests will take a week for processing at both free clinics. 16 "One can 't be too careful these days.
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