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Gay Austin, December 1977
File 010
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Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 010. 1977-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/980.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-12). Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 010. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/980

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 010, 1977-12, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/980.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, December 1977
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript The Texas Observer reports thai, according to the Wholesale Beer Distributors of Texas, Coors sales in Austin dropped 4 between May and July, during the height of boycott activity. I'nfortunatefy the gay boycott is beginning to weaken; many gay bars in Texas which once boycotted Coors are once again selling it. Indeed the Advocate, for reasons that are not altogether clear, recommends the boycott he left to "individual conscience. " Yet if the relative freedom gay people have won over the past few rears is not to be lost in the current wave of right-wing activity, we must learn to identify right-wing activists. To buy or not to buy t 'oors may indeed be a matter of individual conscience. Hut collective action springs from a multitude of informed individual consciences; and only collective action achieves results. when a hastily organized but sizeable contingent of lesbians and gay men joined a march in Austin of about 700 people to protest the tatesl in a sickeningly long series of police killings of Chicanos, this time in Houston. Although homosexual victims oT police brutality often are not identified as gay in news accounts, it is common knowledge that being visibly gay is in many places little different from being black or brown in encounters with the police. We gay people who joined (he march recognized that the murder of Jose' Campos Torres was not merely a Chicano problem but a common problem, that despite differences between us and the rest of the marchers, we were joined with them in our revulsion at the baibarism of the police and judicial system. The most prominent alliances formed by gay organizations since Stonewall have been with women's groups, and lesbians have always been an invaluable part of those groups. A recent project of the Klan, the Birchers, and less histrionic organizations was the infiltration and disruption of the National Women's Conference in Houston. It's hardly surprising that gay people, male and female, should see the events in Houston as of the greatest importance. There were many homosexuals, including members of the Society for the Advancement of Freedom and Equality (SAFE), Austin Lesbian Feminist Organization (ALFO), Gay Community Services (GCS), and the Lesbian- Gay Alliance, at the conference itself and at related events. Like other gay political activities, the Coors boycott clearly demonstrates that we have much in common with racial and ethnic minorities. Since the Coors family has complete control ot the brewery and the numerous other Coors businesses-the ceramics factory, the construction company, the rice farms, etc.-it is impossible to separate Coors family politics from Coors products and business practices. There is a long list o\ accusations from Chicanos and blacks of discriminatory hiring practices by the Coors company. At the Senate hearings on Coors's nomination to the board o\ tlic Corporation for Public Broadcasting (he was nominated by Richard Nixon on his last day in office), Ralph David Abernathy, national president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, said in opposing Coors's confirmation, "Our opposition comes because research and factual evidence prove beyond a doubt that Mr. Coors and his TVN network has been racist and anti-black." The G.I. Forum. a predominantly Chicano organization, has been boycotting Coors beer for nine years. Paul Gonzalez of the Forum's "Have you ever been involved with homosexuals national boycott committee has said, "That family has always had racist ways. In the '30s, they used to have Ku Klux Klan meetings at the brewery." Dr. William E. Hanks, NAACP media coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh and one-time resident of Denver, said, "The feeling of Chicanos who are familiar with the Coors operations are quite negative based on Coors's consistently prejudicial hiring practices against blacks and Chicanos." According to sworn statements from a Coors employee and to testimony before the Colorado Civil Rights Commission in 1970, William Coors urged his employees at a meeting in 1964 to write their congressmen opposing the Civil Rights Act. claiming that its passage would result in the replacement of white workers by blacks. Although the gay boycott against Coors began several years ago in San Francisco, a new and major impetus for the boycott was a strike last April by 1,400 Coors brewery workers. Their strike is not over the usual wage issues, but over matters whose importance homosexuals should be quick to recognize. Many American corporations screen prospective employees with the lie detector test, but few require employees to reveal intimate details of their lives, including their sex lives, to the extent Coors has. According to sworn statements from people who have taken the tests, Coors asks questions like, "'Have you ever cheated on your wife?"; "Did you have relations with your wife last night?"; "Have you ever done anything with your wife that could be considered immoral? "; "Is there anything in your past that you could be blackmailed for?"; "Have you ever been involved with homosexuals?" and "Are you a homosexual?" One man swears in an affadavit that as a Coors employee he attended a meeting at which William Coors stated explicitly that the purpose of the lie detector test was to "eliminate the employment of homosexuals in the Adolph Coors Company." To speak of an alliance between workers, gay people, blacks, and Chicanos is to invite the accusation that one is using the radical rhetoric of ten years ago. But many recent gay political activities- the Coors boycott among them-have shown that both principle and pragmatism require us to recognize how much we have in common with other groups which suffer unfair treatment in a society geared to the demands of white heterosexual males. We would like to thank Ethel Little for most kindly consenting to model. The gentleman in white is Steve flwmas. ■•■aphs are by the author
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