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Gay Austin, December 1977
File 009
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Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 009. 1977-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/979.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-12). Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 009. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/979

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 009, 1977-12, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/979.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, December 1977
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript r contains all NATURAL ingredients.... Or, Why You Still Should Watch What You Drink, No Matter What the Advocate Says by DAVID MORRIS "1 ask for victory over the perverts in this country," shouted Clay Smothers to the crowd assembled in the Houston Astro Arena to voice opposition to the National Women's Conference. "The perverts-meaning you, me, and most of our friends—have become the betes noires around which pink ladies, Klansmens. John Birchers, and other supporters of antique morality have gathered to cast stones. They hate the Equal Rights Amendment, they abhor abortion, but they reserve for homosexuals a special place on their list of abominations and they mean to do something about us. There is no question that a broad, highly organized, and heavily financed campaign is underway to prevent what its proponents consider the collapse of morals and the destruction of traditional family life. And these proponents are, very clearly, the same people who for years have opposed the black and Chicano movements, the women's movement, union organizing efforts, and every other step forward. They represent an established ideological trend, with specific goals to pursue and a specific set of evils to oppose, the latest of which is the gay movement. They are the broader and more permanent basis for such short-lived phenomena as Anita Bryant's Save Our Children, Inc., and are therefore the real danger behind Bryant's hysteria. They are the radical right. To cite an extreme case, one of the independent groups making up the Klan recently called for a Nazi-like final solution: the extermination of homosexuals. But the KKK is only the most dramatic of our organized foes. American Opinion. a publication of the John Birch Society which finds peril around every corner ("Women's Lib. . .threatens the survival of humani- "), published in its May 1977 issue an article entitled "There's No Such Thing as a Good Fairy." "Homosexuality," the article declares, "is a sin —a violation of God's law, It is also, and should be, a crime, since it presages degeneration and death of the nation- state." The article says o\' Anita Bryant. "She is a God-fearing woman, as well as a top-ranking popular singer, and why should she be polite to a bunch of queers'1" The Birch Society's propaganda is diversified. In the specific area of sex, for example, the Society organized a front group, the Movement to Restore Decency (MOTOREDE), whose function is to combat sex education. But the Society does not limit itself to propaganda: a good many elected officials owe their positions to the John Birch Society and its "fellow travelers." Rep. Lawrence McDonald of Georgia, who recently introduced an amendment eliminating coverage of homosexuals by federally-funded legal services to the poor, is a member of the John Birch Society and until 1973 was a member of its national council. His successful 1976 campaign was financed partially by a new but influential organization, the Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress, the same group that recently initiated a drive to reinstate the California sodomy law. It takes money to elect congressmen and publish propaganda, and much of that money comes from a small number of wealthy zealots. In the thick of right-wing politics is Joseph Coors, whose brewery has lately been the object of a boycott by gay people. "Mr. Coors is emerging as a major personage on the American far-right," said Charles R. Baker, executive director of the Institute for American Democracy. "To the best of my knowledge, he is directing more personal and corporate resources into the battle for his beliefs than any other living super patriot." Money from the sale of Coors beer has gone to the John Birch Society and specifically to its anti-sex education front group, MOTOREDE; Coors money founded the Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress, the group that helped elect Rep. McDonald and tried to reinstate the California sodomy law, and the Coors family and Coors executives are still by far the CSFC's largest contributors; over a million dollars of Coors money went to the Ronald Reagan presidential campaign; Coors money has supported the Committee of Nine, an organization which operated at one time from the Senate offices of Spiro Agnew, an organization whose purpose is still to do research for right-wing candidates; thousands of Coors dollars were dor te ! to the re-election campaigns of Richard Nixon ■ Agnew. 8 Joseph Coors and his brother William deny in a recent Advocate interview with David Goodstein and Sash a G regory-l.ewis that they have any interest, pro or con. in sex as a political question. But as a regent at the University of Colorado, Joseph Coors (like Frank Erwin at the University ol I in ardent foe of student activism . of which aav liberation was ;i part. He said of birth control information for women students, "This is the type of thing that certainly doesn't make people think well of the University. I think girls shouldn't go to school with the intention o\' needing the pill. I think they should exercise self-discipline until they're married." In a commencement address at the Colorado School o\' M ines in 1969, Joseph Coors found fault with his generation for failing to set a better example for youth "in the field of morality and in attempting to preserve a spirit of patriotic enthusiasm for our fine country." William Coors sounds almost a friend of gay people when he says in the Advocate interview, "The only thing I object to is the evangelical approach. Regardless of what a person's belief is, 1 resent anyone who tries to inflict their beliefs on me. I shouldn't say inflict, rather-try to convert me to their belief.". But in fact that's the same kind of stand taken by Save Our Children, Inc., which claimed that being openly gay was in itself an attempt to convert children tohomosexuality. The same reasoning has been used to justify the firing of gay teachers, as has been threatened in Dallas. According to the Washington Post, Joseph Coor's wife Holly "says cheerfully that she is behind her husband 100 per cent in everything." Their apparent agreement is interesting in light of Mrs. Coors's membership in a committee of the King's Ministries, (a maverick group loosely affiliated with the Episcopal Church) whose purpose is "to conduct a continuing program of education to aid clergy and laity in ministering to persons of Gay orientation who are seeking release from the homosexual lifestyle." They believe in gay liberation, but what they mean is liberation from being gay. The newsletter of a small Austin political organization recently criticized gay activists for the "narrowness" of our concern. But in reality Austin gay politics in the Anita Bryant era has been marked by an awareness of common predicaments, common needs and common foes, and by a willingness to make common efforts with other, equally "narrow" groups. No project lias shown more clearly the naturalness of mutual aid among minority groupsi including gay people. than (he campaign foi passage of the original Fair Housing Ordinance, an effort which failed to achieve its primary goal hut prompted no! only the political coining out of many gay people but also the uncompromised tupporl of ( i and blacks. That same sense of solidarity prevailed m ore recently
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