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Gay Austin, December 1977
File 007
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Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 007. 1977-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/977.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-12). Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/977

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 007, 1977-12, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/977.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, December 1977
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript BOY HUSTLING A Shocking Expose! BOY PROSTITUTION IN AMERICA r'or Money or Love: Boy Prostitution in America, by Robin Lloyd. New York; Ballantine Books, 1977- $1.75. On local newsstands. by Michael Wertin The author of ~or Money or Love says early on in the book that he became interested in the subject of boy prostitution when his two teen- a^ed sons were approached by a man who "allied then late going over to his house and posing for nude pictures. From this fact, and from the rather lurid picture of a young hustler on the cover, one might gather -hat ?cr -■■cney or Love is just another insensitive exploitation of the already nmch-abused gay lifestyle. Fortunately, the book is nothing of the kind. It is, thankfully3 a thorough, well-researched and compassionate analysis of one of the most problematical aspects of gay life today. Although one can only guess at Lloyd's motives for writing this book, it is to his credit that once he examined the facts, he reached sensible conclusions that are consistent with what any knowledgeable gay person would also conclude about the subject. Lloyd found that the majority of "chickenhawks" are white, middle-aged married men who are attracted to the convenience and anonymity of quick sex with boy prostitutes. And the majority of these hustlers are poor or rootless young men who for the most part consider themselves straight, but who engage in prostitution "for money or love." Lloyd makes very clear the fact that most of the boys have not been raped or otherwise coerced into their vocation. They choose it voluntarily, being attracted to the easy money, the abundance of paying customers, the dream of being swept off to a better life by a wealthy sugar daddy, and only peripherally (they insist) because of homosexual concerns. DEVASTATING.. NEEDED TO BE TOLD Money nor J Love Robin Ucwd Senator Birch Bayh As every gay person knows, hust- Iers---especially chicken or chicken- looking hustlers are common to larger cities (and in selected areas of smaller cities such as ours), but Lloyd is careful not to indict the highly-visible gay population of these cities for their existence. He rightly criticizes schools, churches, welfare agencies, police departments, and America's peculiar and unloving system of domestic life for providing the atmosphere that inclines so many people toward prostitution, both as providers and ac customers. So enlightened is Lloyd that he suggests as an alternative to these rather harmful institutions an organized social service in which settled, sympathetic gay men and wayward gay boys are deliberately brought together on an organized basis, in an attempt to alleviate the loneliness and alienation of both groups. On the surface, this sounds a little too progressive for many legislators to accept, but given in context with Lloyd's devastating reports about reform school and halfway-house conditions (especially in Texas), it seems the only humane alternative. Anyone interested in the gay situation in America should read this book. Its thoroughly-documented, honest, subdued, and persuasive presentation might serve as a model for all future books about gay life, and its findings and conclusions are significant and supportive enough that all gays would benefit by having them at their disposal. Chickenhawking is a real part of gay life, and the problem is too serious and complex to dismiss as Just another crazy aspect of life. To read this book and to disseminate what it has to say is another step in providing restraint and understanding to a world which often is woefully lacking in both. HOGAH & 1WY, continued from pg. 5 when the Houston cops are watching through the glass front of the Convention Center—sitting and watching. Reports on Sunday had it that the police chief had denied the incident took place. Later that day, the resolution in favor of the ERA was passed overwhelmingly and with much celebration in the aisles and in nightspots afterward. Sunday dawned auspiciously and somewhere the minority women had been caucusing, rewriting the minority women resolution, giving it some real meaning. When it was introduced at Sunday's plenary session as a substitution for the original resolution, people were amazed at the ease with which it passed. We were also overjoyed, and there was much celebration. Reproductive freedom and sexual preference also passed — overwhelmingly. Sexual preference was not an original agenda item; needing only 10 states to be placed on the agenda, the sexual preference resolution was passed at 36 state conventions. We are, afterall, a majority. So, look around you. See all the conservative fringe getting upset? See them amazed that women accomplished so much in so short a time. Be pleased. And for the women and men who came to support women's rights: let's stick together and work. The antis have money and they will fight. We must also. We must win. During the afternoon a pro-ERA rally was held on the steps of the Houston City Hall. It was very strange that somehow the sound e- quipment did not arrive until the last speaker was through. Flo Kennedy encouraged revolution, saying that if we thought we'd get our rights without hurting someone we were wrong and blood would flow. "That time is not yet now," she qualified. Kate Millett spoke of the need for egual rights, especially lesbian rights. Most of us in the crowd were lesbians, so she was very favorably received. The first announcements of the rally had also listed Betty Friedan as a speaker. Friedan has for years spoken of dykes as a "lavender herring," a detriment to the women's movement. She did not show.
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