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Gay Austin, December 1977
File 006
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Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 006. 1977-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/976.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-12). Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 006. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/976

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 006, 1977-12, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/976.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, December 1977
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript by Amme Hogan This article will not be written without bias; I attended the National Women's Conference and enjoyed every minute of it. Excitement and a sense of cooperation pervaded the atmosphere; there was much to be learned—and we learned it; there were new friends to be met—and we met them. A woman from Alaska delivered a note to me from another woman I had met in Michigan. People came together in Houston. I arrived about noon on the Thursday of that week. Trie conference was not scheduled to begin until Saturday, but in the great tradition of politics there were caucus meetings of every conceive- able sort—Hispanic women, native American (I would have gone to that one, but my whisper of Cherokee is believed by no one except my brunette, brown-eyed sisters), NOW, lesbian, etc. At the lesbian caucus Thursday night we began with a discussion of whether the press should be allowed. It was finally decided that they would be, provided that none of our plans were released prior to their execution. Then the real press argument began: photos. Many women in the room were genuinely afraid of cameras. Growled the woman next to me, "I've been out 20 years and it hasn't hurt me." True, but we can't all be Del Martin ... give 'em time. Cameras were finally told to first get permission from the subject. By the end of this debate some of the joy of being in a room full of political dykes had abated; we have come a long way to be able to caucus, but we still have so far to go before we can do it without fear. Friday was' another exciting day. Having got up I wandered through the lobby of the Hyatt in time to see Gloria Steinem getting attacked by hordes of press. She has often spoken in favor of lesbian rights, so I felt the day would go well. At the convention center the crowds had gathered to see the torch run in from Seneca Falls, NY. Seneca Falls was the location of the big National Women's Conference in the nineteenth century, and marathon runners had brought a torch from New York State to Houston. (And the Olympics directors think women can't run marathons!) I was standing on a platform marked "Press Only," from which I was able to see the hands of two women carrying the torch: one white, one black. It kept changing hands, though, and I couldn't see who was who. Actually an entire group of women ran it and they all deserve credit. Saturday afternoon was a rally "Beyond the ERA" organized by the New American Movement. It dealt with minority women's rights, welfare mothers, lesbians—speakers on every subject that was not really being effectively dealt with by the delegates. As the rally was breaking up, the Christian Defense League (the Louisiana Klan) came up with their misspelled signs and their fat red necks. A brief period of chaos ensued, ending with several women bruised and none of the men properly kicked. It's difficult for small women to deal with large ignorant men. It's even more difficult continued, page 6 JEAN O'LEARY, International Women's^ Commissioner and Co-Executive Director of th« National Gay Task Force. Amonp; the spectators at the Mr. Club Austin contest. . . Safe News SAFE (The Society for the Advancement of Freedom and Equality) is a political organization dedicated to preserving human and civil rights. Most members of SAFE are concerned about the rights of minorities because of their membership in one of the most maligned and oppressed minority groups—the homosexuals in the United States. SAFE has worked for the passage of the Fair Housing Ordinance, has opposed the Clay Smothers H.B. 1902, which would have made campus gay organizations illegal, has raised funds for the Dade County Coalition in their fight against Anita Bryant, and more recently has marched in protest against the police brutality in the Jose Campos Torres case, and in support of the Chicano community. As you can see, we have not a spectacular record of success. We need many more people to help us-, SAFE is not a rigid doctrinaire group, we have no official ideology—merely a common concern about the bigotry and homophobia which is on the rise today, and a desire to do something about it. At present, SAFE is cooperating with the Human Relations Department in a study of housing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. If you would like to assist us in providing documentation of housing discrimination against gay people please contact us by phone or mail. Absolute and complete confidentiality and anonymity is guaranteed. Write to: SAFE P.O. Box 8531 Austin, Texas 78705 or call Steven Thomas at 477-7867. SAFE meets on the first and third Sunday of each month at Capital Ceramics, 809 W. 12th, at 8 p.m.
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