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Gay Austin, December 1977
File 004
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Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 004. 1977-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/974.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-12). Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 004. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/974

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 004, 1977-12, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/974.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, December 1977
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript G4Y IM^GG9 Few things are as pervasive in our lives as the electronic media is. Radio and television reach out to millions of people at any given moment. People view television an average of four to six hours each day. That contact is not without effect on the viewer. This column's concern is with how television influences our own as well as the general (straight} public's view of gay men and lesbian women. The reason for this concern is two-fold. First, how does that portrayal of gay people influence the way straight people oppress or accept us, and second, how does that portrayal affect the way gay people perceive their own community. As people watch TV they are exposed to situations, places and people, perhaps for the first time. The way in which a subject is handled has a direct influence on the way people feel about that subject. Viewers learn ways to act in situations they've never experienced by watching the TV characters respond. We need to remember that television, for all of its intentions of being nothing more than entertainment, is a powerful and influential teacher. The problems arise when the "teacher" gives out bogus information which the audience is asked to accept as realistic and factually based. Gay men and lesbian women have been misrepresented by the mass media for so long without the benefit of positive images that the public and uninformed gay people "buy" that image as factual. When you lack contacts with the real-life people that are bein, represented by TV characters you can only assume that the portrayals are accurate. Since gay people are a basically invisible minority straights are not aware that we are everywhere. There is that unfortunate mistaken assumption by the majority of straight neoule that everybody they see is heterosexual. The only way they find out otherwise is when a gay person chooses to confide in them, when they see a stereotypical example, or when they see a character on television they are told is gay. Since all too few gay people can be openly gay and the stereotype is not representative of us as a group, television is the remaining channel in current use which reaches the general public. The examples they show are mixed at best (which will be the topic of future columns). But we must keep in mind that straights are not the only people who are watching these programs. Gay people who may be struggling with the coming-out process look at the stereotype shown them and rightfully question how the character portrayed relates to them. They may ask themselves whether they might not be gay because they're not like the stereotyped people shown. They might also decide that since they are gay they should be like the people shown them. The problem here is one of role models available. The problem goes beyond public relations. We'll attempt to cover it here in this paper. Keep watching. —Bruce D. Aleksander c APITAL ERAMICS 809 W. 12 72-6520 HOBBY CERAMIC SHOP WHOLESALE - RETAIL FULL CERAMIC SERVICES INSTRUCTION MOLDS - KILNS SAFE MEETS HERE ON THE 1st AND 3rd SUNDAY EVERY MONTH at 8:00 P.M. JOIN US BREEDER NEWS NUCLEAR FAMILY MELTS DOWN! HET HACK MURDER The ax-hacked remains of an as-yet 'unidentified woman were found by school children in a ditch running alongside the Eastern Express rail eight miles outside of Metrolex. "Apparently somebody did a bad job of it," grimaced police chief Richard "Mary" Harding, referring to a box containing her legs and other parts. Investigators have yet to determine the motivation for this grisly murder. A coin purse found nearby contained over one hundred dollars. Robbery apparently was not among the gruesome weirdo's aims. A bloodstained ax nearby one of the victim's hands had no fingerprints. Chief "Mary" suggested that sex was involved. 'Whenever you see a smashed face," he said, motioning toward the box, "you pretty well know the nature of the crime. And that's what makes the inherent bestiality of heteros even more shocking. But then that woman probably deserved what she got. If we find that she was normal, we shall immediately call for a statewide dragnet. But I think we can pretty well dismiss that possibility." LABOR LEADER A HETERO (UPl) Britian's capitol reeled as a- nother scandal rocked the nation. A man, identified as Scott 0'Conner, alleged today in a press conference that Labor Party leader Betti Wilson paid him to remain silent about an alleged heterosexual affair the past nine years. He introduced letters allegedly written to him by Wilson where she told him: "Remember my warmest regards always to you. Love, Bet." O'Conner explained that 'Bet' was a term of endearment she had asked him to use. He also held several checks he said were payments by her, after having accepted a post in the party six years ago. "She did me wrong; I was her whore, and I feel Britian should know the quality of 3et"—he laughed—"Wilson." Parliament's Morals Subcommittee under Tory party deputy tJanc Coffee promised immediate investigation.
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