Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Gay Austin, December 1977
File 001
File size: 3.99 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 001. 1977-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/971.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-12). Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/971

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, December 1977 - File 001, 1977-12, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/988/show/971.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Gay Austin, December 1977
Contributor
  • Lind, Scott
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date December 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript December 1977 Gay Austin is the monthly publication of Gay Community Services. The advertisements you see displayed signify these business' current support of the work of the organization. Gladly patronize these establishments, but above all, let the people know that you appreciate their equal, open-hearted support. Herein is the directory of these supportive businesses: BARS Austin Country Pearl St. Warehouse The New Apartment BATHS Club Austin ADULT BOOKBHOPS All American News Stallion Bookstore HAIRSHOPS Comb Free ARTS & CRAFTS Capi t-;l Ceramics Capital Coin Co . 705 Red River 18th & Lavaca 2828 Rio Grande 308 w. 16th 2532 Guadalupe 7o6 E. 6th 1512 West 5th 809 West 12th 3oo4 Guadalupe 472- 0148 478-0176 478 0224 476-7986 478-0222 477-0148 477-8280 472-1676 The Editor, Scott Lind, acknowledges the support of these individuals who made the December edition of Gay Austin an actuality. Editorial Associates were: Contributors were: Art Morris Steve Thomas Correspondence or submissions to Gay Austin may be addressed to: Gay Austin 2330 Guadalupe, Room 7 Austin, Tx. 78705 LETTEl\S Dear Edi tor, I disagree completely with "JB's" analysis of what it means to be gay and what it means to be black and what it means to be Jewish. But I agreed completely with that Het Lust thing. I want more pictures in the newspaper and I:JOre about what' s hap­pening in Austin. Jimmy 1516 w. 9th 2 Dear Editor, I consider your treatment of les­bians still below par. You have almost nothing about us , e.lmost completely about men. If you consider yourself tc be a collllllUnity newspaper, the fact that you print almost nothing about women makes your title, "Gay Austin" ridiculous. A=.ie Vanson 4618 Saltillo Austin Dan Puckett Randy Conners .Amme Hogan Mike Miesch Carole Waychoff. David Morris Dear Editor, I think the last issue of Gay Aus­ti..:: l was much better than the ones be­fore. Who was that good-looking gizy­on the cover? If he lives in Austin, where does he go? I haven't seen him anywhere, and if anybody should know who's here and who isn't, I should. Because I'm everywhere at least three times a night. I go to the Apartment, then to Pearl Street, then I drop by the Stallion/Private Cellar. I go to the baths every other night, and I've never seen the gizy-! If you're holding him somewhere for sake keeping, I un­derstand wby, but how about the rest of Austin? We deserve him too! Sign me DELIGHTED Bur INTERESTED Few things are as pervasive in When you lack contacts with our lives as the electronic media is. Radio and television reach out to millions of people at any given moment. People view television an average of four to six hours each day . That contact is not without effect on the viewer. the real-life people that are being represented by TV characters you can only assume that the portray­als are accurate. Since gay people are a basically invisible minority,, straights are not aware that we are everywhere. There is that un- BREEDER NEWS "-UCLEAR FAMILY MELTS OOWNI This column's concern is with how television influences our own as well as the general (straight) public 1 s view of gay men and les­bian women. The reason for this concern is two-fold. First, how does that portrayal of gay people influence the way straight people oppress or accept us, and second, how does that portrayal affect the way gay people perceive their own community. fortunate mistaken assumption by HET HACK MURDER As people watch TV they are ex­posed to situations, places and people, perhaps for the first time. The way in which a subject is han­dled has a direct influence on the way people feel about that subject. Viewers learn ways to act in situ­ations they've never experienced by watching the TV characters re­spond. We need to remember that television, for all of its in­tentions of being nothing more than entertainment, is a power-ful and influential teacher. The problems ari. se when the "te ach er " gives out bogus information which the audience is asked to accept as realistic and factually based. Gay men and lesbian women have been misrepresented by the mass media for so long without the benefit of positive images that the public and uninformed gay people "buy" that image as fact­ual. CAPITAL ERAMICS the majority of straight people that everybody they see is het­erosexual. The only way they find out otherwise is when a gay person chooses to confide in them, when they see a stereotypical example, or when they see a character on television they are told is gay. Since all too few gay people can be openly gay and the stereotype is not representative of us as a group, television is the re~ain­ing channel in current use which reaches the general public. The examples they show are mixed at best (which will be the topic of .future columns). But we must keep in mind that straights are not the only people who are watching these programs. Gay people who may be struggling with the coming-out process look at the stereotype shown them and right.fully question how the char­acter portrayed relates to them. They may ask themselves whether they might not be gay because they're not like the stereotyped people shown. They might also de­cide that since they are ga;y they should be like the people shown them. The problem here is one of role models available . The prob-lem goes beyond public relations . We'll attempt to cover it here in this paper. Keep watching. --Bruce D. Aleksander 809 w. 12 72 - 6520 HOBBY CERAMIC SHOP WHOLESALE - RETAIL FULL CERAMIC INSTRUCTION - SERVICES MOLDS - KILNS SAFE MEETS HERE ON THE 1st ANO 3rd SUNDAY EVERY MONTH at 8:00 P.M . JOIN US The ax-hacked remains of an as-yet unidentified woman were found by sch­ool children in a ditch running along­side the Eastern EJqiress rail eight :tiles outside of Metrolex. "Apparently somebody did a bad job of it," grimaced police chief Richard "r.:cry" Harding, re!'erring to a box containing her :egs and other parts. Investigators have yet to deter­mine the motivation for this gris:y murder. A coin purse found nearby contained over one hu..,dred dollars. Robbery apparently was not among the gruesome weirdo's aims. A blood­stained ax nearby one of the victi!n's bands had no fingerprinte. Chief "Mary" suggested that sex was involved. "Whenever ~·ou see a smashed face," he said, motioning toward the box, '"you pretty well know the nature of the crime. And that's what makes the inherent bestiality of heteros even more shoc!:i.ng. But then that woman probably deserved what she got. If we find that she was normal, we shall immediately call for a statewide dragnet. But I think we can pretty well dismiss that pos­sibility. " LABOR LEADER A HETERO (UPI) Britian's capitol reeled as a­nother scandal rocked the nation. A man, identified as Scott O'Conner, alleged today in a press conference that Labor Party leader Betti Wilson paid him to remain silent about an alleged heterosexual affair the past nine years. He introduced letters allegedly itten to him by Wilson where she told him: "Remember my war.nest re­gards always to you. Love, Bet." O'Conner explained that 'Bet' was a term of endearment she had asked i.:n to use. He also held several checks be said were payments by herl after having accepted a post in the arty six years ago. "She did me wrong; I was her bore and I feel Britian should ow t' he quality of Bet " - -he lau-hed--'' Wilson." Parliament's Y.orals ubcommittee under ~ory perty deputy anc Coffee pro~ised i::lmediate in­estigation. 3 BISHOPS SAY NO :r. its "?astora: I.etter to the Ch­' Z'Ch :Tor. the nouse of 3ishO'OS II (Oct­ober, 1977) the Episcopal Ch~ch ::i2.de so:::.e state::ents dee..ling with so:::.e ra­ther sensitive subjects • .Among these were reinterpretation of Chri stian dogi:a that dee..ls with the or dination of: both wo:::.en and " ... anyone who ad­vocates andfcr willingly pr actices ho:::ose..~.ialit:;", and upon whom a nup­tia: blessir.g is to be coo:f erred. :r. the state::::ent on the ordir.at~or. of wo:::ier., the church accepts every­one, r egardless of their feel:!..ng on the subject . :'hat is, even tho\l6h =.a.~:; were " ... gla1dened and encot:!"a­ged ... :eca~se of the General Conven­~~ c~'s ac~~or. conce~cing the ordi:la­tior. of •.-o:::er. ... 11 , one is not a dis­loyal E?iscopalian if he or she abs­tair. s fror. supporting the decision, or contir.ues to be convinced that it was ar. error . ':'his attitude refle~ts the concept that the Church should be flexible enough "to accept eve~J­one, e::C. a:;:?ears to be a pclic:,- o:: t~!!..~si~io~ to b~Ve e_~~a ~:!..:ne ~o eie- ba.rd sexis~ ~=adi~~onal~s~s. ON HOMOSEXUAIB In dealing with ho::iosexuality in :::iarr iage and ordination, the House of 3ishops was less than consistent, and hardl:; co::ipassionate. The bishops said that the sexual union of man and won:an is God's will. With an ir.ane logic, they therefore l:!..:tlt its nt."lltial bless:i.= to 11 ••• the union o!' mal~ and fe:::ale ." ':hey ~e.il i:c Sa;/ that a "J..Oior. cf man and woman is God's only desire or that same- sex unions are not ~od's desire. (God cou2.d not be reached for co::::ment . ) NO Gf.::f. ORD::Il"ANDS As if this wasn ' t enough, they went on further to s~.1, 11 ••• the bishops ... deny ordination to an advocating and/ or practicing homosexual person." .A:l this is done on the grounds that each ordinand :=ust fashion ~.is or her life after Christ as an exru::ple to the fai­th:!'. il. :;: such were act-..ie.ll;· the case, a strong argu::.ent for ce:ibacy would be preser.t ir. the Episcopal Chu=ch. The House o~ Bishops sought ~o re­dee= -:h~elves °:;:" evok!r.g -:he ole "we are ell brothers and sisters in Christ" routine . While support of ho­= sexuals is indeed welcome and com­~ endable, after their statements on marriage and ordi!lation, the rest is mere pablm::. They say that we " ... as children of God have full and equal clai!n with all and other persons upon the love , acceptance , concern, and -:iastor al care of the church. 11 They ~all u"OOn our society to see that equ al protection under the law is provi­ded. :his all is little more than con­tradictory in the attitude conveyed ~ ~hei: s~a~enents on the :n.e.rriege and ord:!..ne.~ion o~ gay ~en and lesbian:. The bishops were middle of the road, at best in their entire Pastora~ Letter . ':'hey said little more ~ha.~ : c: course homosexuals are entitled to all the ci ·T..l rights of respectable folks, we just don' t want to deal with the::. Granted, their statements are =re ~han the statement fro~ the V~tican, but r.ot ::::uch better. ---ft.rt Morris WomempJre 1s .1 pl.ice for women co come for 111lor­m. 1t1on. for coun~elmg. and for meeting other women .ind lc.1rnrng .1bou1 t'ie commu111tv We ,ire opt•n from 7-10 pm Tucsd.1} through Frid.iy .1bovc Somme~ Drug .1t 2310 Cu.id.dupe. Telephone 472 .~OSJ. Those Dcemn Queers .... F.or::ophobia is nothing ne-.- . But new ceses pop u~ a:: ~he ~:!.::le . He~e a.!"e so~e :~c~~v exa::.p:es o! bcmophob~a: "--So:::e ;s:r~hiat~ists st!.!.: gi .. ,~ :-~ects !..::jec~ions of pe:a:yz~5 d..~s to 'help' the:r. abolish homose­:~..:. a: :~ndencies. Desp:. te the decla­ra~ ion o~ the .l>:!nerican ?sychiatric .A. ..ssoc!a:.!cr. -:ha.t ho:!Dser..Ia:i-::r is net e. sickness, =any ~sychothera?ists are still tryin;; to conve"t gay cli­e~ ts to heteroseX'~ality or helping thez ~d~ust :.o :.he~ 'handi:ep.' +-.,.,.w.:esbians :ee.vi:lg e s~~a.cuse' :·ew- Yo.!"k Car a~ ::csi:ig :i=e w~re sev~~!y bee~~n ~p Cy a g.!"O"i.Ip of :"rater::-: tr ~-e:~ ~~o= the :1.~!:by t:.!'li­versi 'tj". So:e of tr:.~ wc!!!.ec su:ff'!.!"ed brok~~ ::=.bs e.nd :onc~ssio~s. ·-~·'.e...~y pe.ren~s disown or i."lst!­~ ut~one~iz~ chi:~~~ who ~hey disco­ver to be hcmosexua:. ~r. the n~sstands of Paris, rou can cu:; a cartoon postcard sho-..r­ing t"..ro soldiers in the barracks :ookir.g at a third who is ::ressed ir. e pir..k ~igh~go~ and black =esh st.o­cki~.; s. :~ is ca~~ioned 'la folle du regi=e~~· ' the ~~e~r o~ th~ reg!.=~~t ) . ~n a ~s Angeles television ~ogre=, cc=edia:: Mer~ Sar.l .recer.tly e.d·10cated t!:e £:i::::.:.ng of homoseX'..ial.;. 4 F~ 'Was :iot ~e.A~g a Joke, but t.a2- !..~; se~io~sly . :Z:::ediately e.ft~r ~he prcg"a::., the :.A. ~ay Coi::::t:.~ity 3er­\ 4ices Ce~~e~ ~e~e!v~d s everal bo=b three.ts. ----~. -::rooosed housi::;; ordinance in A~sti;, :exas including equal -::rcte~tion fc" bo=oseX'.tals, s=oused ~uc'h host:.:.:. :.r -:hat "the city' s news­~ a:;iers were f~l:ed with a.~ti -homose-x ·..:.a~ ~e~:.ers ev~n weeks after the o~di~ance passed, i~s s~>:'~a: pre~er ­er.~ e section deleted. ***A study paper on homosexuality coi=nissioned by the Presbyterian Ch'.lrch, U.S. (Southern) was circula­ted e.itong member churches for discu­ssion. Several congregations pulled out of the denomination, even though the paper did not advocate homosex­• 1ality as such. -----------~ _________ ..., la&& ··-·--·· I •-•- 2 532 Guadalupe 1 '/!7oi //,,e adive man'' the llest selection In adult materlal ••• Anywhere! BOGAN we can'~ all be Del Vartin ... give 'em tin:e. Cameras were finally told to first get permission from the subject. Py the end of this debate some of the joy of being in a room full of political dykes had abated; we have come a long way to be able to caucus, but we still have so far to go before we can do it without fear. Friday was' another exciting day. t-y A.'ll:lle Hogan Saturday afternoon was a rally "'Peyond the ERA" or "'anized by the New P~erican Mover:lent . It dealt with minority women's rights, welfare l!IOthers, lesbianS--s;eakers on every subject that was not really being effectively dealt with by the dele­r, ates . As the rally was breaking up , the Christian Defense League 1 the Louisiana Klan) came up with their misspelled signs and their 1his artic:e wil: not be writt~n without bias; I attended the Natio­nal Women's ronference and enjoyed every m:!.nute of it. Sxci tement and a sense of cooperation pervaded the atmosphere; there was much to be 'earned--and we learned it; there were ne;~ friends to be rr.et--and we ~et them. A wo~an ~rom A'aska deli­vered a note to me rrom another wo­man I had =et in Michi ,an. People ca~e +,ogether in Houston. I arrived about noor. on the hursday of that week . 'ihe confer­ence was not sched:tled to begin until Saturday, but in the great tradition of politi~s there were ~au•"JS meetinll;s of every conceive­able sort--Hispanic women, native An:erican (I would have eone to Having got up I wandered through the !obby of the Hyatt in t~e to see Gloria Steinem getting attacked by hordes o~ press. She has often spoken in favor of lesbian ri ;h.,s, so I felt the day would eo well. fat red necks. A brief period of chaos ensued, ending with several women bruised' and none cf the rr.en properly ki6:ed. ::t' s difficult for small women to dea: with larGe ig­norant ~en. It's even more difficult that one, but my whisper of Cherokee is believed by no one except my brunette, brown- eyed sisters), NCM , lesbian, etc. At the lesbian caucus Thursday ni~ht we began with a discussion ~f whether the press should be al­lowed. It was fin~lly decided that they would be , provided that none lf our plans were released prior to their execution . T'hen the real press arcruroent beo:an: photos . Many women in the room were -i:enuinely afraid of '::ameras. r.rowled the woman next to me , "I've been out 20 years and Lt hasn't hurt me." True , but At the convention center the crowds had gathered to see the torch run in from Seneca Falls, NY. Seneca Falls was the location of the big National Women ' s Conference in the nineteenth century, and marathon runners had brought a torch from New York State to Houston. (And the Olympics directors think women can' t run marathons ! ) I was stand­ing on a platform marked "Press Only," from which I was able to see the hands of two women carry­ing the torch: one white, one black. It kept changing hands , though, and I couldn't see who was who. Actually an entire group of women r an it and they all de­serve credit . continued , page 6 JEAN 0°LEARY, lnternatoonal Womens ear Commissioner and Co E•ecuti:ve Director ot the National Gay Task Force. Safe News 5 Amonr the spectators at the Mr. Club Austin con­te:; t ... SAFE (The Society for the Advance­ment of Freedom and Equality) is a political organization dedicated to I preserving human and civil rights. Most members of SAFE are concern­ed about the rights of minorities because of their membership in one of the most maligned and oppressed minority groups-the homosexuals I in the United States. SAFE has worked for the passage of the Fair Housing Ordinance, has opposed the Clay Smothers H.B. 1902, which would have made campus gay organ­izations illegal, has raised funds for the Dade County Coalition in their fight against Anita Bryant, and more recently has marched in pro­test against the police brutality in the Jose Campos Torres case, and in support of the Chicano community . As you can see, we have not a spectacular record of success. We need many more people to hel P us-; SAI'E is not a rigid doctrinaire group, we have no official ideology--merely a common concern about the bigotry and homophobfa which is on the rise today, and a desire to do something about it. At present, SAFE is cooperating with the Human Relations Department rn a study of housing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. If you would like to assist us in providing documentation of housing discrimination against gay people please contact us by phone or mail .1 Absolute and complete confident1ahty and anonymity is guaranteed. Write to: SAFE P ,0 . Box 8531 Austin, Texas 78705 or call Steven Thomas at 477-7867 . SAFE meets on the first and third Sunday of each month at Capital Ceramics, 809 W . 12th, at 8 p.m. BOY HUSTLING For ~ or Love: ~ Prostitution in America, by Robin Lloyd. new York; Ballantine Books, 1977. <1-1. 75. On local newsstands. by llichael Wertin ':he authc!" of Fe:- f.ione".: c!" I.eve ::.ays ee:ly oi: :..~ t;he 'bciOktbat~ bece::e i::te.rested ir: t~e s~bject of be .. p::-osti-..t:.t;io:: whe:: his ;;we teen­e. ged sons ;;e::-e approached by a I:la..'l who te.!!:ed ~=~ :!..:::;o going over to his house and pos!=.g !er ::rude pict­cres. :ire:: t!l!s :'ac~, e::d frm:l the rather :urid pic"ure of a young hus­tler on the cover, one cig!:t gather that :'o::- Monev or ::.Ove is just ano­ther Inseilsfilve e:::olo:::tation of the a.l.re!l.dy ::uch-aln!sed-gay :i!estyle. Fortuna"ely, the book is no"hi.'lg of the kind. It is, thonl:::'ully, a thorough, ve:!.1-researched and compas­sionate a.na:ysis of one of the most proble:::atica: aspect;s of gay life to­day. Although one car: only guess at Lloyd rs ::oti "/eS fo::: "WT! t~g th'!.s book, it is to his credit; tha" once he exa­~ ee the fac"s, he reached sensible =onclusions that are cocs~s~ent with W::at a::r:f bowledgeable gay person ~o~ld a!.sc conclude about; the subject. Lloyd found that the =.ajority of "chicker.hawks" are white, ::iddle-aged =arried mec who are attracted to the coi:Yecience and anonymit;y of qu!.ck sex with boy prostitutes. And the ca­joritJ of these hustlers are poor or rootless young men who for tbe most part consider themselves straight, but who engage in prostitution "for !:lDney or love." Lloyd makes very clear the fact that :ir.ost of the boys have not been raped or otherwise co­erced i.r.to their vocation. They cho­ose it vol=tarily, being attracted to the easy !!X>ney, the abundance of pay'...ng cus"vocers, the drea::i of being swept off to a better life by a wea­lthy S'.igar daddy, and only peripher­all;,• (they insist) because of hoIOO­sexual concerns. HOO AN & rMY, continued from pg. 5 when the Houston cops are watching through the glass front of the Con­vention Center~sitting and watching. Reports on Sunday had it that the police chief had denied the incident took place. Later that day, the resolution in favor of the ERA was passed over­whelmingly and with mu.ch celebration in the aisles and in nightspots afterward. Sunday da:wned auspiciously and somewhere the minority women had been caucusing, rewriting the min­ority women resolution, giving it some real meaning. When it was in­troduced at Sunday's plenary ses­sion as a substitution for the original resolution, people were amazed at the ease with which it 6 BOY PROSTITUTION IN AMERICA :JEVASTAT l\G NEEDED TO 8 TOl.D I:; ® 8aw<ino -,. ,.,",. ... 6 passed. We were also overjoyed, and there was much celebration. Reproductive freedom and sex­ual preference also passed ~ overwhelmingly. Sexual preference was not an original agenda item; needing only 10 states to be placed on the agenda, the sexual preference resolution was passed at 36 state conventions. We are, afterall, a majority. So, look around you. See all the conservative fringe getting upset? See them amazed that women accomp­lished so mu.ch in so short a time. Be pleased. And for the women and men who came to support women's rights: let's stick together and work. The antis have money and they will fight. We must also. We must win. During the a!'ternoon a pro-ERA A Shocking Expose! J..s ever/ gay persor. knows, hust­: ers---especially chicken or chicken­: ooking hust;lers---are co=n to :arger ci"ies (and ir: selected areas of s:::e2.~er cities such as ours), but :1oyd is care.ru.: not t;o indict the highly-visiole gsy population of the­se ci~ies ~or ~heir existence. He ri;ht;ly cri~ici:es schools, churches, we:!are agencies, police depar-::ments, a-~d P.=erica's peculiar e..~d unlo-r-~g syste:: o~ domestic life for providing the at!!losphere that inc:ines so ::ian;,' people ~oward prostit-~tion, both as ;!"'cvid~s and as customers. So e::lightened is Lloj-d that he suggests as e.n alternative to these re.ther he.r-fu: i..~stit-~tions an organ­ized social service in which settled, Sj;:i:pathetic gay men and wayward gay boys are deliberately brought toge­ther on an organized be.sis, in an at­te::: pt to e.1.leYiate the loneliness and e.lienacior. of both groups. On the su::-face. this sou.'lds a :!.itc:e too progressiYe for ::.a.'ly legislators to accept, ~ut given i:: contexu wi~h r.:oyd's devasvating reports about refor:::. schoo: e..~d hal..~ey-house con­di~ ions (especially in :exas). i" se~s ~he only hUlllane alternacive. Anyone interested in the gay si-cu­a" ion in .America should read this book. Its thoroughly-documented, hon­est, subdued, and persuasive presen­tation n:.ighv serve as a~odel for all !'ut-=e books about giey- J.i:fe, end 1 ts !indings and conclusions are signi~i­cant and supporti-,e enough that e.1.1 gays would benefit by having them at their disposal. Chickenhawking is a real part of gay life, and the problem is too ser­ious and complex to dis:niss as jus~ a-~other crazy aspect of life. To read this book and to dissen:.inate what it has to sa;r is another step in provi­ding restraint and understanding to a world which often is woet'ully lacking in both. rally was held on the steps of the Houston City Hall. It was very strange that somehow the sound e­quipment did not arrive until the last speaker was through. Flo Kennedy encouraged revolution, saying that if we thought we'd get our rights without hurting someone we were wrong and blood would flow. "Tha.t ti.me is not yet now," she qualified. Kate Millett spoke of the need for egu.al rights, especi­ally lesbian rights. Most of us in the crowd were lesbians, so she was very favorably received. The first announcements of the rally had also listed Betty Friedan as a speaker. Friedan has for years spoken of dykes as a "lavender herring," a detriment to the women's movement. She did not show. THE LADY OF DADE The Lady of Dade, Anita by name, called on a seamster of worldly fame, Saying, Seamster, Make a dress for me, That I might seem lovely as a bride to be. And when he had set her in the height of fashion, He found her eyes were shot with passion, Saying, Seamster, Seamster, Look at me, Lovely as a bride to be, In my gown of satin laced with silk, Wilt thou not marry me? Wnereupon the seamster, chuckling, did say, But Milady, I am a man from the Land of Fay. Whereon she ripped the gown to shreds And chided him all day. The Lady of Dade, Anita by uame, Next called on a fruitman of worldly fame, Saying, Fruitman, Fruitman, find for ne An orange to make a sweet soul of me. So the fruitnan searched his oranges ripe, And regarding her as the greedy type, He handed her the biggest of the bunch, Saying, Lady, this will make a tasty lunch. And when Lady Dade had sucked it dry, He noticed an arrow had pierced her eye, Saying, Fruitman, Fruitman, look at me, Am I now tasty enough for thee? Oh, no, l.Jilady, tho sweet thou be, the sweeter.fruitman be did say, For tho I nay marry, A Lord he'll be, For I am a man from the Land of Fay. Whereon she spit the seeds from her throat And scolded him all day. The Lady of Dade , Anita by name, Then called on a minstrel of worldly fame, Saying, Minstrel, write a song for me That I might a dame irresistable be. Whereon he wrote an amiable t tme Of birds and bees and a winking moon. And as she warbled it three times seven, She saw the first stars appear in the heavens Saying, Minstrel, Minstrel, look at me, Aren' t I a nightingale meant for thee? And he answered, Oh Milady, you've been fooled today, For I, too, am a man f'rom t he Land of Fay. And cursing the minstrel and bis devilish tune She hysterically stormed f!May. The Lady of Dade, you all know her name, Called on a priest of worldly fame, Saying Father, Father, Grant to me, The power of Her who outholies thee '!'bat I might banish f'rom our village this day l'he sinful men;:.;rom the Land of Fay. For wicked th~ are and cursed they be For none of them will marry me. The priest disguised her as a virgin maid And placed in her bands a dove Saying, Remember, Milady Anita of Dade, It must seem like an angel 1 s act of love . So the Lady went to the village square And beginning her speech with a tearful prayer, Demanded the flesh of all that day Who'd told her they loved in a different way. Demanded their bodies roast in flames And faggots they be called by name. So burned were the three and banished all they Who had come to her town from the Land of Fay. One blunder the Lady Anita made, She bethought her husband far away, But there, on the pyre with his lovers three, She noticed the corpse of the Lord of Dade. And from that day She has little to say Concerning the men Fr= the Land of Fay. ---Randy Conners 7 !!:'.. tcbik:::.g a!ld neet:..n.z two guy'- w":::.o t~e you o-..:.t "!:or jokes and laugh at your d.r .:.nlcs an::l. bet; you W::.th i:ru:n1endos and p:i'..:err_.s gazes to be "the::.r sensual f"a.:-.tasies to be their d.rea::.s but never ue too real an~ never be l:ru::!a.; T'ney beg ~;ou W::.th sof't f'yes to be :=..lJ.. fles~ a.::d wa::t =d hot. a."1d ne..- beg ~'it~ se=tle toug!::..:-.ess to give a.::::l. O?e.": pla:::id.1.y no, ~e·fC!' let the::i feel o~lty of wa.~on thCT.Jtiht~ ez:a. u.:!Car~ de::!.res !or t!:ey are !:'~a?: c...."'ld ya.:. are the fa~eless wo:n.a..": o~ their ~<..:.tas!es ---Carol Waychoff Olp Broumas : 1976 \\"inner, Yale Series of Younger Poeu Competition Capital Coin Co. extensi1t1 sel•ction of COINS and CURRENCY GOLD JEWELRY FROM All THE NORLD Buys Antiques and All Gold 3004 GUADALUPE 472·1676 contains all NATURAL ingredients .... Or, Why\ ou Still Should \\'atch What You Drink, :\o \ latter \\hat the _\ drncate Says b) DAVID \\ORRIS "I ask for victory over the perverts i'l th.s country," shouted Clay Smo••1ers to the crowd assembled ir tre lluuston Astro Arena to voice op::ios1t1on to the \ati.>ndl \\ omer's Conference "T'-e perverts meani g you, me, anc. most of our friends · have t-eco11e the beres 1101re:; Jround wri,ch p1rk !Jdies Klansmens. John Bircrers, ar d other supporters of artique !T'orality rave gathered to i;.ist st">nes They hate the Lqual Rights Amendment, they abhor abort10n. !Jut they reserve tor homosexuals a special place on their list of abominations ar<l tl>ey mean to do something abou• us. There is no quesllon that a broad, h1grly orga111zed, ard heav,!} financed campaign ts underwJy to prevent what its proporents c0nsider the co'lapse of morals and the destruction cf tr.idttional farPily life. And these proponents are, very clearly, the same people who for ye.irs have opposed the black and Chicano movements, the women's movement, union organizing efforts, and every other step forward. They represent an estab· lished ideological trend, with specific goals to pursue and a specific set 0f evils to oppose, the latest of which is the gay movement. They are the broader and more permanent basis for sue!- short-lived phenomena as Anita Bryant's Save Our Ch1ldren, Inc .. and are therefo•e the rea; danger behind Bryant's hysterta. They are the rad1ca' riglit To .:ite an extreme case, one of the independent groups making up the Klan recently called for a :\azi-like final solution : the extermination of homosexuals. But the KKK is only the mvst dramatic of our organized foes . America11 Opi11io11. a publi~ation of the John Birch Society which finds pen! around every corner ("Women's L ib th•eatens the survival of humani· ty "),published in its '.\l ay l'l77 issue an article entitled "There\ :So Such Thing as a Good Fairy" "Homosexuality," the article declares, '"is a sin a violation ,,f yo d's law. It is also. and should be, a crime. since it presages degeneratton and deatJ1 of the nation· state." The article says of AnitJ Bryant. "She is a God-fearif'~ woman , as well as a top-ranking pop1:ar s111ger. and why sh c ulJ she be polite to a bunch of queer.s'?" The Birch Society's propaganda is diversified. In the specific area of sex, for example, the Society organized a front group. tre \i ovement to Restore Decency (MOTOREDEJ, whose function is to combat sex education. But the Society does not limit llself to propaganda. a good many elected officials owe their positions to the John Birch Society and its ·•fellow travelers." Rep. Lawrence McDonald of Georgia, who recently introduced an amendment eliminating coverage of homosexuals by federally-tunded legal services to the poor, is a member of the John Birch Society and until 1973 was a member of its national council. His successful 1976 campaign was financed partially by a new but influential organization, the Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress, the same group that recently initiated a drive to reinstate the California sodomy law. It takes money to elect congressmen and publish propaganda, and m uch of that money comes from a sm all number of wealthy zealots. In the thick of right-wing politics is Joseph Coors, whose brewery has lately been the object of a boycott by gay people. " Mr. Coors is emerging as a major personage on the American far-right," said Charles R. Baker, executive director of the I nsti­tute for American Democracy. " T o the best of my knowledge, he is directing more personal and corporate resources into the battle for his beliefs than any other living super patiiot."- · Money from the sale of Coors beer has gone to the John Birch Society and specifically to its anti-sex education front group, \10TOREDE; Coors money founded the Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress, the group that helped elect Rep. McDonald and tried to reinstate the California sodomy law, and the Coors family and Coors executives are still by far the CSFCs largest contributors , over a million dollars or Coors money went to the Ronald Reagan presidential campaign : Coors money has supported the Co mmittee of Nine, an organi­lallon wh1cl' operated at one time fr om the Senate offi ces of Sp1•0 Agnew , an organ1Lat1on whose purpose is s till to d o research fo r nght-wing candidates; thousands of Coors dollars were dor• · ~ J to the re-election campaigns of Richard \'ix o n ard SpHo Agnew . Jose pl• Coors and l11s brother William deny ltl a recent 1 Jrucat<' interview with David Goodstein and Sasha Gregory-Lewis that they have any interest. pro or con. in se' as a political question Hut as a regent at the Lnrversrty of Colorado, Joseph Coors (like I· rank I· rwin at the Lnivers1ty of Texas) was an ardent toe of student activism, of whid1 gay libcratron was a part. li e said of hnth control information for women students, "This is the t) pc of thing that certainly doesn't make people think well of the Ln1vcrs1ty I think girls shouldn't go to school with the intenti0n of needing the pill. I think they should c'erc ise sell-d1scipline until they're married." In a commencement address at the Colorado School or Mines in 1969, Joseph Coors found fault with his generation for failing to set a hetter example for youth "in the field of ri1orality and in attempting to preserve a spirit of patriotic enthusiasm for our fine country ." William Coors.sounds almost a friend of gay people when he says in the Ad1·ocace interview, "The only thing I ohject t~ is the evangelical approach. Regardless of what a person's belief is, I resent anyone who tries to inflict their beliefs on me. I shouldn't say inflict, rather - try to convert me to their belief.''. But in fact that's the same kind of stand taken by Save Our Children, Inc., which claimed that being openly gay was in itself an attempt to convert child ren to hom osexuality. The same reasoning has been used to justify the firing of gay teachers, as has been threat~ned in D all as. According to the Washingcon Post, Joseph Coor's wife Holly "says cheerfully that she is behind her husband 100 per cent in everything." Their apparent agreement is interesting in light of Mrs.Coors's membership in a comm it tee of the Kin g's Min is· tries , (a maverick group loosely affiliated with the Episcopal Church) whose purpose is "to conduct a continuing program of education to aid clergy and laity in ministering to persons of Gay orientation who are seeking release from the homosexual lifestyle." They believe in gay liberation, but what they mean is liberation from being gay. The newsletter of a small Austin political organi1ation recently critici1ed gay activists for the "narrowness" of our concern. But in reality Austin gay politics in the Anita Hryant era has been marked by an awareness of common predicaments, common needs and common foes, and by a willingness to make common efforts with other, equally "narrow" groups. Nu project has sh own mo re clearly 1he naturalness of mutual aid among m1nunty gr o ups, in cluding gay people, than the campaig11 for pa,sage or the original Fan ll o using Ordrnance, an dfort which fallcd to ac hieve its primary goal but prompted not only the p o lrtic ·tl c o1111ng o ut o r 8 many gay pe o ple but also the un comprom1se 1l su pp0r t o fCl11 canos and hlac ks That same sense or solrd ,inty p revu1k d '11<>re recent!) /1ie 1 exas Ol:>server r<'ports that, accordmg ro rite ll'lrolcsale Beer D1strrb11tors of Te~as. Coors wlc1 in A rotm dropped 45 '1etuce11 \la" and Jrtlv. drtring the lrciglzt oJ bm·cott acti1•1t1'. l 11f ort1111ateil' tire ga1· bo1·cott is begim1mg to weaken. man\' gat bars m I cws wlriclr once bm·cottcd Coors are once agam 1d/111g 11 /11decd tire ,\dvo<.ate. for rcasom tlrat are 1101 altogetlrer </car, reco111me11ds tlu bowort he left to ''111div1d11al conscience." l'et 1( tire rclatll'< jrcu/0111 ga1' people hare wo11 01·cr the past few 1·cars 111101 to be 1011 in the crtrrl'llt wa1·1• o(rigl1t·Wi11gact11'i11·. 11·c 11111<t leam to ulcnt(li• right·ll'i11g act1visl\. To brt1• or 111>1 to b111 ( oors 111111• i11dccd be a matter of i11Jirid11al co11sc1e11cc 11111colic<11· c act1011 sph11gs from a 111ultit11Je of 111fom1cd 111 /111 lual c011sc•e11ccs amt 011/1; col/ec111·c activ11 ac/11el'cs resrtlts. \\lien a hasll y organized but slleable ,onllngerit of lesbians and gay 1Pcn Joined a mdrcl> in Aust111 of ab0ut 700 people to protest t11e latest 111 a s1ckcn111gl} long series of poll,e killings of Chicanos. this htl'C 111 llouston. Although homosexu.il VlCllmS or police hrutaltty often arc not identified as ga} 111 news u,counts, 1t 1s "ommon knowledge that being 1·1s1bly gay is •n many places (,tile d1 fe•ent lr.>m being bla~k or brown 111 cn,ountcrs with the police. \\ e ga) people who jo111cJ the march recognized that the r111rdcr of Jose ( ampos Torres was not merely a Chicano prohlcm but ,1 common problem, that dc,pitc diffrrenccs between u' Jnd 1hc rc>t of the marchers, we were J1>1ned with them in our rev11ls1011 Jt the barbarism of the police and jud1.c1al s} stem . fhc most prominent alliances formed by gay organizations since Stonewall have been with women's groups, and lesbians have always been an invaluable part of those groups. A recent project of the Klan, the Birchers, and less histrionic organizations was the infiltratton and disruption of the National Women's Conference in Houston. It's hardly surprising that gay people, male and female, should see the events in llouston as of the greatest importance. There were many homosexuals, 111clud111g members of the Society for the Advancement of Freedom and Equality (SAFE), Austin Lesbian Feminist Organi­tation (ALFO), Gay Community Services (GCS), and the Lesb1an­Gay Alliance, at the conference itself and at related events. Like other gay political activ111es, the Coor:. boycott clearly demonstrates that we have much in common with racial and ethnic mtnortties. Smee the Coors family has complete control of the brewery and the numerous other Coors busrnesscs the ceramics factory, the construction company, the rice farms, etc. it is 11npossihle to separate Coors family politics from Coors products and bus1nc» pract11:es. There is a long list of accu ations from ('hican<lS and blacks of d1scrim1nato1y hi11ng practices b} the Coors company. At the Senate hearings on Coors's nominJtion to the board ot the Corporation for Publi<: llroa1kast1ng (he was nominat.ed hy Ri~hard :-;1xon on hrs last day 1n oll1cc), Ralph David ,\bernathy, nat111nal president of the Southern Christian Leadership C11nferen.:e, said 1n opposu1g Coors's confi1matrnn, "Our oppos1t1on comes because research and factual endcnce prove beyond a douht that ~tr. Coors and lus 1 \':S network l1Js been racist and anti black" 1 he (,,I 1·orum. a predom1nanll) Ch1,a110 organtLJllon, has been hoi cot1tn Coors beer fo1 111nc }Cars. Paul Gonzalez of the l"orum' 9 "lla\e you ever hecn in\Ol\ed with homosexuals'!'' national boycott committee has said. "That famil> has always had racist ways. In the '30s, they used to have Ku Klux Klan meetings at the brewer} " Dr.\\ 1lliarri E. Hanks, :\AACP media coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh and one-time resident of Denver, said, "The feeling of Chicanos who are familiar with the Coors operations are quite negative based on Coors's coos1stentl} preJU· dicial hiring pracuces aga1mt blacks and Chicanos." - According to sworn statements from a Coors employee and to tes11111011y before the Colorado Civil RiRhts Comm1ss1on in 1970. \\ 1lltam Coors urged his cmplo) ees at a meetmg m 1964 to write then congressmen opposmg the Cn1l Rights Act, claimmg that tts passage would rc:.ult in the repla.:ement of white workers b~ blacks. Although the gay boycott agnmst Coors began several )ears ago Ill San Francisco, a new and major impetus for the bo) cott was a strike last Apnl by l.400 Coors brewery workers Their strike 1s not ove1 the usual wage issues. but o\er matters whose importance homosexuals should be quick to recognize. !\tany American corporations screen prospecll\'e employees with the he detector test, but few require employees to reveal intimate details of then ltves, including their sex li\'es, to the extent Coors has. According to sworn statements from people who ha\'e taken the tests, Coors asks questions like, "Have you ever cheated on your wife?"; "Did you have relations with your wife last night~"; "Have you ever done anythmg with your wife that could be con­sidered immoral?"; "Is there anything in your past that you could be blackmailed for?", "Have you ever been involved with homosexuals?"; and "Are you a homosexual?" One man swears in an affadavit that as a Coors employee he attended a meeting at which William Coors stated explicitly that the purpose of the lie detector test was to "elimioate the employment of homosexuals in the Adolph Coors Company." To speak of an alliance between workers, gay people, blacks, and Chicanos is to invite the accusation that one is using the radical rhetoric of ten years ago. But many recent gay political activities­the Coors boycott among them-have shown that both principle and pragmatism requne us to recognize how much \\e have in common with other groups which suffer unfair treatment 111 a society geared to the demands of white heterosexual males. lt'e would ltke 10 thank f rliel I illlt' for most kmJil' c.i11sentmg 10 model. The Kentle­ma11 ill 1d1ite is S1e1·e Thomas. Ill pilot ~raphs are b1 tl1e autlz r 10 Editor's Note to Gay Austin Readers: Some consider the Coors issue still a controversy. Thus Gay Austin published David Morris' viewpoint. However that does not necessarily L~ply that Gay Community Services or Gay Austin agrees with his stand . Rather, in the search for truth this newspaper believes that alternate rviigewhtp ocionmtse s srheosupldo nbsei beixlpitrye.s sed; ther efore, press freedom must be guaranteed---but with this In the interest of presenting alternative viewpoints--so that the reader may see all sides of the issue and decide for her/hi:L- self--we reprint the letter released on September ]{, by the Austin Tavern Association. FOR OUR CUSTOMERS September IA. 1977 AUST! \I TA VER\ ASSOC I A Tl O~ Austin Gay Bar Owners have been under increasing pressure from segments of the Gny Community to demonstrate Bar support for Gay Rights by joining a boycott of COORS beer. COORS has vigorously objecte<l to Bar participation in a boycott and recently sought an opportunity to present its side of the controversey. SAFE sponsored a meeting held in Austin September 1.1 to which all Austin Gay Bar Owners were invited. Those present included representatives from SAFE, WGCaSr,e hAoFuLse-C, IOan, d CTOOheR S P(rnivaatitoen Cale l&la lro. cal), The Apartment, Aust in Country, llol lywood, Pearl Street Individuals representing several political action groups advocating the boycott presented their cases. Basically, they claimed that the Gay Co11111Unity should boycott COORS beer because (1) the company discriminates against Gays in employment practices and (2) the private profits from the sale of COORS beer is used by the COORS family to finance Anti-Gay political movements. When asked to document the allegations made against COORS, they were unable to do so. Indeed, tdhuer infagm tihlye wenast ireev e2r ',p-hreosuern mteede.t ing, no evidence of any Anti-Gay stance by either the company or One official of a pro-boycott organization admitted his guilt in spreading a rumor which he knew to be untrue at the time he told it: that a COORS family member had donated money to Anita Bryant's Save Our Children (see reverse). On the contrary, the COORS representative pro­vided rather conclusive evidence that neither the company nor any member of the family had ever given money directly or indirectly to any grcup which used the money to oppose Gay Rights. It was also charged that COORS uses preemployment polygraph tests to pry into the sexual orientation of prospective employees. The allegation was based chiefly on the fact that COORS does require persons to state whether or not they have a personal history of undetected crime. The COORS representative stated that to accuse the company of \nti-Gay employment practices on the basis of that question was absurd; but that the company now realizes Gay concern about the potential misues of the question and is considering changing the way it is phrased. The COORS representative unequivocally endorsed his company's support of basic human rights and further stated that there is no known instance when the company has ever discriminated against an employee because of sexual orientation. In addition, he said that he would accept the meeting's suggestion and immediately begin to gather copies of union contract clauses prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation (such as those used by 3M, IBM, XEROX, and AT&T) pforor cecdounrseids.e ration by the Board of Directors of COORS in a near future updating of their employment The Gay Bar Owners endorsing this Report believe each Bar patron is responsible enough to make his or her own personal political decision regarding the purchase of COORS beer. We will not deny that freedom to our customers, simply on the basis of the totally unsubstantiated charges which we have seen levied against COORS, despite the pressure being used to force us to remove our customers' freedom of choice. Indeed, we are favorably impressed by the concern COORS has shown in cooperating with the Austin Gay Community in this matter. We refuse to permit our es­ttoab lbieslhimeveen tCsO OtoRS bies usined fatoc t oAppnotis-eG CaOyO. RS until we have seen evidence which gives us some reason SAFE has agreed to continue to assemble the facts supplied by all sides and to keep us in­formed of any important changes in the situation .. Just as we initiated the Austin project to raise funds to fight Anita last spring, we Austin Gay Bar Owners will continue to work toward the establishment of full equal rights for the Gay Community. And there is no more important right than the right to exercise your freedom of choice. 12-~i-iy ·:~~~c:--- ~ ~ Pearl Street h·are~ouse :ftie /ffvate Cel1ar QUEER FACTS by Twinki McMillan "I'LL NEVER TRICK AGAJ'J!" says prominent gay activist . A local gay libber, tired of the Austin scene, was observed in a Dallas peep booth. And who was that hun­ky stud going down on him? You guessed it--dear old Dad. He burst out of tha peep show shrie­king, 11 ::: 1 11 never trick again!" You know who you are, :1.r. X. While we're on the subject o"' 7ay crusaders, were yo~ invited to W.E.'s posh new apt. for a pot-'uck social? The entire Who's Who of the local lambda crowd was there, includin yours tr•.ily. '. T. 's "'arious potato sa­lad was •reat, but then eyebrows WP.re raised when W .E. unveiled his secre~ plan. We won't kiss and tell, but expect to see him soon dancin~ cheek-to-cheek with Mayor 'kClellan. Oh well, poli­tics makes queer bedpartners. But really now. Absolutely everyone--and I mean everyone--is weary of D.P.'s endless stories of hot sex with the stars. We know that can ' t be true considering the reports we've 'ad at the tubs. And whoever brought that 14 inch black dildo to the baths- ­you can get it in the lost- and­found . Was he in drag or not? One thing for sure, if you're stop­ped for speeding on Ben White, d-:m' t bend over. They're really getting tacky at Allandale Baptist Church . Everytime we show up on Sunday they make us take a chromosome test. Once we were inside the sanc­tuary, we found simply the entire congregation atitter with the news that Rev. O' Chester (Hunky Hal to his intimates) may soon receive the call to Hollywood. Watch out, Donald Duck! Speaking of quacks, what about that doctor chasing that chicken? He pr escr ibed plenty of bedrest, but the pa­tient only obeyed half his or­ders . Quack-quack . Quack- quack. Copyright 1977 Tacky News Service A typical meeting of Gay Community Services, Art Morris presiding DROP EVERYTHING AND HEAD TO Club Austin 308 W. 16th St 11 Gey Singe!': :.arry Paulette :a:rrJ Paulet~e is one o! the ~irst open:y gay s:_ngers to record for a major labe: (Vene--ua!'d 79386) . ':'his young J:lall has gone tb!'ough New !ork's best showcases e.::id ~70 performances of the ::rJ.sical, :.et ~ Peo"Dle ~­':' o c;uote the :iner notes : " ••• th:!.s singer of secrets, this actor on pri­vate stages wanted to be a star: up­~ ront. out- ~ront, and Gay ••• ". Along vi.th accon::pl:!.shing that, he has g~ed attention :'!'"o:n in-:.ervi.ews wi-:h the Ad"locate and Mandate. :arr:,'° :?aule-:.te :!.s a fine singer witC e s~rong ~yric bari~one voice. He de::ionstrates that he has a grasp o~ a w:!.de range c~ sty:es ani d;rna­i::.:. cs as he goes th!'ough the ga:\!t of e:notions. :'he songs include the ve!'"/ e::ius:!.ng D:.Xie:.and nu::ber '7reeke!'"s 3a.:l", the beauti~l ba:lad, "'.:'::-:!.ad", 11'.:'ake Me 5ome With !ou"---wh:!.ch was :.ar!')'' s showstopper ::rem :.et My Feo~le Come. 'The song :!.s a pl<!a o:: e.-m~-;: gay ba: a~ c :os~g ti=.e. I~ ~~at v~ ir. he a:so goes ~r-l"'ough a ~! sec e!'"~ang~ent 12 of "Our Da~· Wi:: Come," as well as a h::.gh Ca?:lp version o:: "R'.lbber Duckie" and "100 Ways to :::..Ose a Man". But the title song o:' Charles Jl.znavour' s chanscn, "Commen-v :!.ls d:!.sent" (What Makes a Me.n a Aan) is breathteking. The singer here pulls out the stops , both vocally a.~d dramatically. This song shows the singer to his best ad·.rantage. ':'his a:bum also shows 1arry Paul­ette to good advantage--a:though some of the ca::;piness mey bother one and with some songs there :!.s a sameness of a few selections. :'his a: bu= i s e rel ie! ~o!'" those who are t :!.red of d:!.sco or ::-ock w:!.th a gay the:: er des:!.g:ied for a gay aud:!.ence. I t 's e. p:easure to hear an:,· singer, gay o::- straight , who can me.:::e one l augh or cry , or th:!.nk and get a.~:; . I hcpe : arry Pau:et te 1 s c e.reer grows a.~d 17:!.ll be a r ole :todel for other s:!.ngers l ike hi=. ---1'1.ike l•'.iesch :i:;:s of one dead. S::ccke spirals :'ro::i the beard e.s he pours the wine, battalion of ca-,dles. 3lood spilled in bowels , bed shared b:,· brother s, ·,,e d!'ee=ied o=: the trees our =the!'s , the W:.ne and smoke c=: the wo::ian at the crossroads. E~ ea~~~~g c~ the 1ead , as f: e.::ies are the l eaves sca~t e~ed in ~h e winds of ni ght . : s_::;>s we~ with beard, h e ':·'a...""::ls ~e ;..":!.th wi."lgs, were I to cr:!.ng back a t-,r..g in my t eeth. ':o captU!'e his words, uncarved roads of t horns and s a-,d his breath h:!.s gi::t to ree. ::o;: hard to sh:u-e the blood and bones when a bare room e..~d a bed is al l we have. Stirring of torches, bread and clood of ghos~s, soldiers stand gt:.B!'d before the tower. !o er.•"1.sion his corpse, his b!'eath as ice, s~:ent as d~gers his vineyard of beard. I a!:! a child wanting as a child a ~a., whose W::.ngs are sc~l ed wit h blood. :·::"lo van~sbe s i n s=le>ke e.s bree.d blar.iteted by snow, --;fr:e!"e : c a."lr.ot find h!l:, ::.....~d toge:he~ hi~ bones . : re::.ain e~~a...'lgled :!.~ the ;"ines of h:!.s words, : r adl::!.r.g th:!.s goblet cf ashes. .l.s ;;;;igs o:' love :?.re h.:!.s l:!.ps ar.d e:res, tee ":·r..ne a.~d bread o:' the heavens . - --Randy Conner Out of an acrid haze danced Iggy Pop, a 30 year-old = with the body of an 18 year-old god. Clad only in tight, torn jeans and a soon- discar­ded fishnet shirt, the spirit-~al fa­ther of pu.."lk- rock attacked the Arma­dillo on the first . By the way, he won. !ggy has always been a unique performer , and from his days with the Stooges (the first punk band) until today, his i:rusic has always be­been unclassifiable. llo longer does he slash himself with broken bottles ar:d roll in cru­shed glass, although the scars are still there, faint reminders of the days of d...i-ugs and self- destruction. No longer does he leap into the audi­ence, though he stays near the edge of the stage, always threatening to plunge atop us. Ho, Iggy Pop has grown up. HARD &ID F .~T DeS?i~e c~arges that his associ­ation with David 3olrie has emascula­ted his :::usic, "he new band rocks hard and fas-c. '.:'he :::usic im' t uunk but i-c's not rock either---it's- ju~ ! ggy Pop music, sooe of the best mu­sic put out this year . Starting with "s::.xteen"- - - Sweet .;ixteen In leather boots Eody and soul : go c:-az~· Baby :•::i hungry S1;eet sir.:een the band played ::iost of -:he new :ilbu=, interspersed with a few songs f rom t he bad/good days. Briefly, the songs played were: ":::.ust for Life" ( 'Well I'm just a mo­dern gu:y/ A.'ld of course :•ve he.d it L'l t he ear before' ) , "Heighborhood Threat," "Fell in Love with :-:e " "I Got a Ri•g h t , II 11Th e Pa ssenger "J "Soi::e ~feird Sin" ( 'Things get' too st:-~ght 'I can ' ~ be:i.r it/ .•. That's when : w~'lt So~e weird sin. Get it?•), ":•ight clubbing," "Raw Power," and "::: Wa.":..'la Be Your Dog." Iggy is ser~al, there ' s no doubt :i.bout i t. Eut hor:.o-? hetero- ? :t dc­esn't seer. t o ::iatte:-. He's there a.'l.d ·:ie likes being touched. :Sy ever"Jbody. SWEATill>, POUNDINI I>o perfor!!ler =intains such con­:; tant rapport with his audience as :rell as Igg-J. I was at the very edge of the stage and wasn't ignored, as :'ans usually are by =sicians. Iggy involved each of us and I guess i"'s '!.t this poL'lt that the reviewers al­~; ays fail in trr.-ng to describe an Iggy Pop concert . Unless you' re there , swea"ing ;Ti th him, being pounded by the sa:ne ~lectric !lIUSic, being frightened by the suggestions of the old anarchic· ~"iorence--- and it frightens hi1n t oo---you can't bagine at all, at :i.11, what his performance is like. He S8'fS that watching hiI:l in con­cert is really "witnessing -:ny pres­ence." He's right; there's no other :ray to describe it. !' ve been to a hell of a lot of rock concerts, bu" he sweat on me, S?it on =e, let =e ~ouch hil:l, and .;-:;epped on =-.r hand. God! :t was a t he greatest concert :•ve ever been ~o . Desuite the fact that Igg-; Pop nelped- found punk- rock, he doesn't ?lay it anymore. 'The Sex ?:.stols do, though; in fact, for =any, they define it. 13 SEX PISTOLS LATEST ':heir first alb=, ' NEVER !·!:?ID 'TIS 30U.OCKS ~·s TI!!: S:::X PISTOLS, ias just been released and it is ever ything Pis'tOls fans hoped for. Included are the A- Sides of all :'our singles ( including the banned ".Anarchy in che U.K. " and "God Save ':;he Queen") plus eight other origi­.1al songs. '.!:o someone unacquainted with punk, =.ll the songs have a sa=ey sound ab­.: iut the::::.. :&.t re=e::.ber :;o= and Dad 3<i:{i..'1g that abou-: rock? Or Gra.?::pa sa:;i.r.g that about jezz? Or: closer lister:i.ng, the songs are clearly distin~'t . .Johr..r.y Rotten 1 s s~arl o~ a vo~ce un~or~at~l:, .. ren­ders many of the .lyrics uni:::.telligi­ole, but the ones which do ge-: thro­ug!:. to .America."'! ears are surprisi.ng­lj · complex, filled W::. th anger and political discon~ent. "Holidays ir: the Sur.," the new single frorr. the al­bu:::, begins, 'A c~eap holiday i.n other people's :::i£e..~· ••• ' and goes on ~o deliver an ar-:ict:.::..ate a-:-:ack en i~ser:si-:ive a!ld esca~ist touris=. !:ardl::· ~e US""..:.al su::jec~ :ia-:~er for :;:r..mk- rock, bu-: then the Se.~ ?is­~ ols are~·~ ~he ?.a:x>~es. ':'!le~ =~sic is su;:er!"iciallj" si=:i.3..ar, bu-: ~here is a ::!es sage in -:he =sic, a step up froi:: the bli.nd rege, sex, or vio:ence. Whe."l p-..mk- rock treaks :.n .ll.:::lerica, the Sex ?istols are goi..'lg -:o be at ~he ;·e",;-Wave' s crest. 3-..:y the albu::: now; i~'s the bes-: introduction -co the =~sic o~ ~he ~ighties ::iow on the =ket. 3~· the alb=. ~ the albu:n. Jisco is dead. :::.Ong live pur.......k._!_ __... Recoi::=ended new releases: :us~ ~ I.i:~e, :!!>e>J Pop :Rocke-: to ::.ussia, Ra=nes :;ever Y.. i nd ~ Bollocks •. • , Sex Pis-cols 3lank Generation, ?.ichard ~ell & the Voidoids .... - 14 m mJ.LIOI IOOISTOU 706L6th 11 .... 1 AUSTIX.TBKAS OPIN TIL 3•111 AUSTIN COUNTRY CALENDAR Sundays : beer bust 7-9pm Tuesdays and Wednesdays: free draft 10-llpm 1'hursdays: lOpm Tiffany Jones Show with guests Weekends afterhours Dates : December 31: New Year's Eve Party PEARL STREET WAREHOUSE CALENDAR Tuesdays and ':'hursdays : Free beer 9-11 Sunday through Wednesday: No cover charge Dates: December 16 (Friday): Anniversary party, "A Toe.st to Pearl St" . Free cham­pagne. $1.00 cover charge. December 18 (Sunday) : "Pearl St. Revue" . Hot dogs and a beer bust with a show. December 24- 26: Bar closed. · December 31 : New Year's Eve Party. Call the club for details . NEM APARTMENT CALENDAR Sunday: Happy Hour 12- 8pm Monday through Friday: Happy Hour 4-8pm Saturday: Happy Hour 4-8pm SOME BOTANICAL NOTES ON CHRISTMAS POINSETTAS by S . B. The scientific name for those showy red, pink or white flowers which seem to appear everywhere around Christmas time is Euphorbia pulcherrina. Most people around here know poinsettas as potted house plants, but in their more tropical native habitat-Mexico and South America-they grow into large 12 foot bushes. To make house plants they are usually propogated by cuttings taken early in the summer from stock which has been saved over the winter. Winters in Austin are generally mild enough that the plants growing outdoors are killed back to the ground, but the rootstock survives and provides new growth for cuttings in the spring . Poinsetta plants will form flowers whenever the nights are long and the days are short, and thus, by con­trolling the length of their days, one can force them to make flowers at any time of the year. ~m/J}ML Handmade Haircuts at People's Prices 1512 West 5th 477-8280 Look carefully at the next poinsetta flower you see . What at first appears to be a single, large flower is not, to a careful observer, a single flower at all . Rather it is a cluster of flowers surrounded by brightly colored leaves called bracts. The flowers themselves are yellow and somewhat corn shaped. At the top of the flower is the pistil (the egg producing part), and surrounding it is a cluster of anthers (the parts which make pollen). To the side is a conspicuous protrubance--like a little volcano--which is a gland that makes large quantities of nectar. Sometimes the winters in Austin are mild enough that poinsettas will bloom outdoors (this winter is a good candidate!), so don't just throw your plants away after the bracts fade. Keep it until the spring when there is no danger of frost and plant it outdoors. A final warning: the milky sap which oozes out of any wound on the plant is poisonous--don 't eat it, smoke it, or shoot it up. You will get sick if you do. 472-4978 .. - 15 FOR SEXUALLY ACTNE PEOPLE IT'S A FACT For sexually active people it's a fact of life--venereal diseases (VD) are communicable diseases almost always spread by sexual contact. Because of the stigma attached to VD and other sexually transmitted diseases, myths and misinformation about them have flourished. When VD is transmitted through gay sex the stigma is compounded. The result is that myths and taboos are magnified, misinformation a­bounds and often moralistic litera­ture exaggerates the consequences of infection to the point of frus­trating enjoyment of a full, sexual life. Sexually active people do face an increased risk of infection. But, caring for those we love in­cludes the responsibility of know­ing about sexually transmitted diseases and preventing their spread. By dealing with VD openly, we can soon eliminate the stigma associated with getting and pass­ing VD and eventually eradicate the diseases and the risk of hav­ing sex. FACTS ABOUT GONORRHEA (CLAP) Gonorrhea is the most common venereal disease and can be spread by oral, anal, and vaginal sex. Initially it is a localized infection caused by the bacteria Neisseria qonorrhoeae which can affect the penis, rec~um, mouth, or vagina. PENILE GONORRHEA Within 3 to 7 days after con­tact a thick whitish-yellow dis­charge (pus) will occur from the penis accompanied by mild to in­tense burning during urination. However, sometimes a drip with­out burning or burning without a drip will occur. Any unusual or intense penile discharge or sen­sation merits a visit to a physi­cian or local VD clinic. Untreated penile gonorrhea can cause a form of prostatitis (painful inflammation of the prostate gland), penile stric­ture (scarred tissue inside the penis) and gonococcal epididymitis (intense irritation and swelling of the balls). ANAL GONORRHEA Many people with anal gonor­rhea have no symptoms. When symptoms are noted, they include a mucous anal discharge, intense rectal irritation, tenesm us (a feeling of incomplete evacuation after defecation) and burning dur­ing defecation or intercourse. Anal contacts of persons with penile gonorrhea should recieve treatment since medical exam­ination may not detect rectal gonorrhea and cultures are not dependable from this site. 16 PHARYNGEAL GONORRHEA (GONORRHEA OF THE THROAT) Symptoms of oral gonorrhea usually are not noticed. If sym­ptoms are noted, they include a mild to severe sore throat, fever and chills. VAGINAL GONORRHEA As with anal and pharyngeal gonorrhea, those with vaginal gonorrhea may not have symptoms or they may be so slight that they go unnoticed. Occasionally, a vaginal discharge and a burning sensation during urination may occur. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GONORRHEA Gonorrhea can be diagnosed by microscopic analysis of specimens taken from the urethra of the penis. A culture test is the best method for detecting anal, pharyngeal and vaginal gonorrhea. When visiting a physician or VD clinic for a check-up you should ask for a rectal and throat culture if you think you need them. They are not usually performed routinely. An accurate blood test has not been developed to detect gonor­rhea. Gonorrhea may be completely and quickly cured without last­ing damage to the body 1f dia­gnosed and treated soon after in­fection. Self-treatment is dan­gerous and often ineffective. Inadequate treatment may cause symptoms to disappear even though the disease can still be spread to others as well as cause severe bodily damage. Treatment with left-over antibiotics may contribute to the development of a resistant strain of gonorrhea. CONTROLLING THE SPREAD OF GONORRHEA The gonorrhea epidemic could be ended if all sexually active people will do two things: 1) get an examination every 9 0 days, or whenever s ym pt oms are noticed, and 2) if you are treated be re­sponsible for insuring that all your sex partners within the past 30 days receive an examination. Sex could be a whole lot better if the worry of gonorrhea was re­moved. For more information concerning the control of venereal diseases in the gay community, please call the City Health Department, VD Services at 476-1168, or call Gay Comm unity Services at 4 77- 6699 between the hours of 6 and lOp.m. Examinations, treatment and VD control services may be con­fidentially obtained free of charge at the Austin Health De­partment, 1313 Sabine, across from Brackenridge Hospital. Hours: Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. 1-4 p.m. 1-4 and 5:30-8:30 p.m. 8-lla.m. 8-11 a.m. 8-11 a.m. and 1-3 p.m. Club Austin sponsors free blood tests on the third friday of every month from 10-12 p,m. Member­ship is not necessary for admit­tance to the test. Tests will take a week for processing at both free clinics • \\-~-_, j l __ - =~ "One can't be too careful these days. "
File Name pdf_uhlib_5962538_197712_ac.pdf