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The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983
File 004
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The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983 - File 004. 1983-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/908/show/898.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-11). The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983 - File 004. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/908/show/898

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983 - File 004, 1983-11-11, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/908/show/898.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date November 11, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Sweat Socks: One Woman's Story Commentary Nov. 11,1983/The Star 3 By Sharon McDonald When it comes to sports, I have always been cordial but distant. As a child, the full extent of my athletic repetoire was the repeated climbing of a single tree in which I would sit for hours daydreaming of an even less active childhood. I thought that once I grew up, I would be free ofthe daily pressures to run, jump, slide, hit and catch. Call me naive, but I looked forward to my adult years as a fruitful time for affairs of the intellect. Back then, women were allowed, no encouraged, to let their muscles atrophy in peace. But right around the time I would have begun living out my happy destiny as a sedentary grown-up, I fell in with an energetic group of women who called themselves by a strange new name: feminists. At first I thought their philosophy meant more choices for everybody: I could be either a chemist or a karate champion. What I didn't know was that the karate champion didn't have to study chemistry, but the chemist would have to take up some arduous sport to stay in the feminist ballgame. Only the language had changed since childhood. Yesterday's "Get your nose out of that book," has become today's "Get in touch with your body." This is a paradox of modern feminism that I find difficult to understand: nobody tells Rosie Casals to write a book, why do they tell me to play tennis? It's important at this point to explain that I don't dislike sports just because I'm no good at them, although that certainly helps. But simple ineptitude is a mere embarrassment that's easily forgotten. What's not easily forgotten is a lifetime of sprains, strains, cuts, scrapes, bruises, lacerations, concussions and temporary embarrassments. I dislike sports because I hurt myself doing them, sometimes quite badly. I can fall and chip a bone on any type of surface you've got, from grass to concrete. The only time I can catch a ball that's hurtling straight at my unique and fragile face is when it knocks my last two fingers backwards three inches farther than they were ever meant to go. I think it's about time for feminists to face the fact that some women were just not meant to totter four inches off the ground on blades, wheels, a foor-long slab of wood or anything else. Women whom I would otherwise consider caring friends have tried to get me out there into the danger zone. "Look at you! You call yourself a dyke? Look at that arm. Where's the muscle?" "It's in my fingers. I type 90 words a ..." "You've got to start thinking about your health!" "I am. I'm staying inside where it's safe." "You don't know what you're missing." "Yes I do. Pain." It doesn't help that Louise is on the side of the athletes in this. One balmy evening Catholic Gay Ministry To Conduct Workshops New Way Ministry, a national Catholic gay ministry group, will sponsor and conduct a tour of one-day workshops on "Homosexuality and Family Ministry" in six cities in Texas and Louisiana during November and December, they announced. Sr. Jeannine Gramick, SSND, who wrote the newly released Homosexuality and the Catholic Church, and Fr. Robert Nugent, SDS, A Challenge to Love: Gay and Lesbian Catholic in the Church, a nun and priest, respectively, who have been engaged in ministry with lesbian and gay men since 1971, will conduct the workshop, they said. The workshop will explore the sociological and pastoral dimensions of homosexuality, and is designed for educators, counselors, social workers, clergy, religious, social justice advocates as well as family and friends of lesbian and gay Christians, they said. The San Antonio workshop is to be Nov. 29 at Incarnate Word Motherhouse, Centennial Hall, 4515 Broadway. The Austin workshop is scheduled for Dec. 1 at St. Edward's University, Our Lady Queen of Peace Chapel, 3001 S. Congress. FREE PERSONALS IN THE STAR See Classified & Personals Form in the Back when she and I were in the first glow of new found love, she chanced to ask what sports I enjoyed. When I said none, that lovely period of idealized romance passed forever into history. Some people are so judgmental- Louise's childhoood had been a whirlwind journey from championship this to championship that. From a modest beginning at prizewinning marbles, she went on to conquer her neighborhood at baseball, ping pong, basketball, skating and so on. She once remarked to me what an easy transition it had been to go from GAA (Girl's Athletic Association) to GAA (Gay Activists Alliance) without even changing T-shirts. As if our relationship wasn't tenuous enough, Louise decided that we needed to jog together every night. I reminded her that I considered achieving normal posture an athletic event. She could not be moved. I said I'd think about it. True to my nature, I approached this subject first from an academic angle. I read all the books about jogging, and it was there that I learned about cramps, strains, faintness of breath and "overdoing it." I stopped reading. Next, I went shopping. After pricing jogging shoes, I came home with the aforementioned faintness of breath. This was soon followed by faintness of heart. The more I though about it, the stupider it seemed. Being an urban dweller, certain physical pursuits like karate or running do make sense to me. But jogging has no such intrinsic, pragmatic value. What self- repecting mugger responds to, "Back off. buddy, I'm a jogger"? Not does jogging provide you with an escape maneuver; it just doesn't work to jog away from an attacker. This is in sharp contrast to the more versatile sport of running, which can be utilized either to run from an attacker or to run to attack someone. Jogging, on the other hand, produces only two concrete results: stronger calf muscles and better wind, both of which are good for only one thing—more jogging. I presented my findings to Louise, but you can't tell her anything. So, with our frail relationship hanging in the balance, I purchased the proper shoes, baggy shorts and sweat socks and revised my will. I was ready. Louise glanced up from the television, lit another cigarette and said, "Not tonight, hon, let's start tomorrow." The next night she was meeting a friend for dinner and suggested we wait one more day. The following day she came home from work exhausted. "How about tomorrow night, sweetie?" she groaned. By now, all I can say is it's a wonder I've retained my sweet disposition and tolerant, loving, giving, accepting attitude through all this. If in the name of feminism or health or God knows what else my lover and friends advocate chasing a ball around, or want to browbeat others into doing the same, I'd be the last one to say it's not an excellent use of time. I mean, if they want to move their conversation to the level of debating the absorption capacities of different brands of sweat socks, I'd never suggest it was a step down. Some people might say these women have become sweaty, ill-clad, panting bores, but not me. Goodness, if I let a little thing like watching my friends beome competitive over-achievers turn me into an unsupportive name-caller, well, what would that say about friendship? As for Louise and I, we have made a peace of sorts by discovering a physical activity we can do together. .Although it is more private than a jog around the local park, I will say that it has satisfied both our wants by providing exercise, sweat and exhaustion without requiring a trip to the emergency room. Until something better comes along, this will do just fine. McDonald, who lives in Los Angeles, is co-winner ofthe 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay newspapers. Greetings Soap Well, here we are "Soap" in Austin and San Antonio This little column each issue is here to spread the dirt—and remind you of some ofthe events coming up at Austin and San Antonio clubs. — □ — Happy 36th anniversary to Jose and Leo of El Jardin. __D_ It's time to start thinking about Thanksgiving. Bernice Shubert and Fran Marquis of the New Faces in San Antonio will have their Official Grand Opening Thursday, Thanksgiving Night, the 24th, with Tony Lawson presenting the "Jude Garland Show." Plus free buffet 6- 9pm, free champagne 7-9pm, with the show at 10pm.. — D — A reminder that Dirty Sally's in Austin opens Sam every morning with Ouintin and happy hour till 2pm. — D — Raw Power in S.A. is now not/usf your Nu- Wave and Rock night club. It's your Blitz night club. Open nightly with OJs from New York and Sweden. —□ — The 2015 in S.A. is determined to get you feeling real good ... with beer specials Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday nights. — □ — The El Jardin has been around San Antonio since the early 40s, as we all know. (Where were you thirty years ago? Let the guys at El Jardin know. We're working up a special ad). The El Jardin will be open Thanksgiving Day from noon on with "Nellie Hour". — o — Back to Austin and Back Street Basics. They're having a Veterans Day Millitary Ball this Sunday ,the 13th. Get out your best dress or uniform and report in. Cash prizes for the best dressed military couples—and drink specials for everyone all weekend. Now, if you are looking for other reasons to have a celebration sometime in the next two weeks, here are several events to spark your imagination as an excuse for a party. Friday, Nov 11: David Ignatius Walsh was born today in 1872. So that means you can celebrate that your middle name is not Ignatius. Actually, old Iggie was a U.S. Senator from Massachusets that became involved in a homosexual scandal in 1942. Seems police raided this New York "male brothel" (bathhouse? questions CA Tripp in his book. The Homosexual Matrix) and arrested manager Gustave Beekman. They then offered Beek- man a deal for cooperation and he named Walsh as a customer Newspapers plastered Walsh's name on their covers for weeks—and the Senate conducted a sensational investigation—but it cleared Walash. Police then prosecuted Beekman on charges of "sodomy," found him quilty and sentenced him to 20 years in prison. He served every day of it. And special thanks to Martin Greif's The Gay Books of Days, from which we gathered some of this information. Friday is also Veterans' Day. Monday, Nov. 14: Herman Melville's Moby Dick was published today in 1851. And, good God!, Joseph McCarthy was born today in 1908. But on a more refreshing note, Arthur Bell, gay columnist for New York's Village Voice, was born today in 1940. Tuesday, Nov 15: Pike discovered his peak !oday in 1806. Wednesday, Nov. 16: Al Capone was released from jail today in 1939, three years early for good behavior Saturday, Nov 19: Apollo landed on the moon today in 1969 And also, we'll have a full moon very late Saturday night (Actually, the moon is officially "full" at 6:30am Sunday morning. But it'll be "fuller" Saturday night than Sunday night.) Monday, Nov. 21: Thomas Edison invented the phonograph today in 1877. This invention was the first step in a long walk leading up to discos Wednesday, Nov 23: Boris Karloff was born today in 1887. Thursday, Nov. 24: It's Thanksgiving. And we should be reminded that a three-course meal at Delmonico's in New York cost I2cents on this day in 1834.
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