Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983
File 001
File size: 5.86 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983 - File 001. 1983-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/908/show/895.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-11). The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/908/show/895

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983 - File 001, 1983-11-11, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/908/show/895.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Star, No. 1, November 11, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date November 11, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Kennedy Urges Spotlighting AIDS By Larry Bush WASHINGTON, D.C.-Sen. Edward Kennedy m • Mass.) is spearheading an effort to give AIDS more polit• ical visibility before the Senate and the Reagan administration. Kennedy, who was part of a team effort that added $30 million to the Senate appropriations bill to fund the Public Health Emergency Fund-only to have the extra money dropped in a Senate-House confer­ence committee in early October-now has garnered the signatures of 14 senators on a letter requesting that Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) hold AIDS hearings in the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Among the senators cosigning Kennedy's letter are three of the four Democratic senators seeking their par• ty's nomination for the presidency in 1984: Alan Cran­ston (Calif.), John Glenn (Ohio) and Ernest "Fritz" Hollings (S.C.). Only Gary Hart (Colo.) is missing. Republican heavyweight/I on the letter include Sen. Lowell Weicker (Conn.), who is chair of the appropria­tions subcommittee on health issues, and Mark Hatfield (Ore.), chair of the full appropriations committee. In all, seven of the 17 members of Hatch's committee signed the letter but observers noted that among the missing Democrats was Tom Eagleton, the Missouri senator who was McGovern's first vice presidential nominee in 1972 and later party to a lawsuit against hi11 niece for charging that he was involved in homosexual vacations in Key West, F1a While Kennedy's staff sug&ests that the letter primar• ily will help keep political visibility on the need to moni­tor the Reagan administration response to AIDS, others such as the Federation of AIDS-Related Organizations lobbyist Gerald Connor and National Gay Task Force Washington representative Jeff Levi are hoping that Hatch will decline the request for hearings. The key concern is the make-up of the Hatch commit­tee, which is controlled by Republicans who are on the New Christian Right side. Those include Jeremiah Den• ton (R-Ala.), the ex-POW; John East (N.C.), a Jesse Helms protege; Paula Hawkins (F1a.), a Mormon like Hatch; Don Nickles (Okla.), outspokenly anti-gay; and Charles Grassley (Iowa). Kennedy pitches his hearing requegt with that make­up in mind, noting that "Senate hearings would fOCUB national attention on the health concerns involved in this issue, rather than i1,volving the Committee in a moral dispute." Overall, Kennedy railles many of the is•ues that were also aired in the WeiBS hearings in August in the House, and the Waxman hearings in Los Angeles in 1982. Looking for the Average Gay .Texan Columnist Joe Baker inside THE STAR AUSTIN * SAN ANTONIO Nov. 11, 1983 • Issue. 1 • Published Every Other Friday Can We Talk? Welcome to the first issue of THE STAR, the new Austin/San Antonio-area gay newspaper. The first thing to be remembered about this newspaper is that it is primarily, but not exclusively, a paper for, by and about the gay community, It will feature stones, photographs, reviews and pieces of gen­eral interest to and about the gay com­munity in Austin, San Antonio, Corpus Christi, and the nation at large. Secondly, this is the newspaper of the gay community. It is your newspaper. A 'though it will have an editorial attitude and approach, that approach will befash1• oned by your response to it. Thus, you are encouraged to write, call or otherwise inform THE STAR about what you like and what you don't like. Letters to the editor are heartily encour­aged. News aboutyourorganizations,811g­gestions for stories-all these and whatever else you would like to say to THE STAR, will be seriously considered. No suggestion will be too "off the wall" for THE STAR. Finally, Austin is not only the capital of Texas, it is also the center for the Laidback Community, Texas' San Francisco, the Janet Cobb and Juan Ochoa, co-chairpersons of the Austin lesbian Gay Political Caucus ALGPC Meets Monthly Officers and members of the Austin Lesbi­an/ Gay Political Caucus met in the Com­miHioner's Court in the Courthouse Annex Oct. 25 for the organization's most recent monthly meeting. Juan Ochoa and Janet Cobb, co-chairpersons of the group, presented i88ues. Paul Clover spoke to the assembly about the Waterloo Counseling Center, a non, profit corporation offering help to the adaptational ne..-ds and life concems of gay men and women. Clover, one of the founders of the ctn ter spokt'I of the servi, c£>.s offered, including' coun cling, educa­t1on11l B<'minnrs, profes111ona! consultllt1on and commuruty services development. Clover emphasized that the primary concerns of the center at the moment are funding and a permanent location. A lengthy discussion concerning possi­ble endorsement of political candidates by ALGPC followed, ending in a move to post­pone a decision until a late~ date. As part of this, informatio!1 abo1;1t t~e recent ALGPC voter registration dnve m some gay busine88es was presented. The voter registration drive will continue, and help for this drive is solictied. The caucus meets the last Tuesday m each month at 7:30 p.m. ,.,th the next mttting srhf'dul~ for Nov. 29. remnant of those who sought the Green• mg of America in Texas. Austin probably has more different kinds of alternate tab· loids and free papers than any city in Texas. Memones of the old "Austin Rag" come to mind, in the days of the free pre,s then popular in America of the 70s. THE STAR will continue the Austin tradition of real freedom of the press to say what we think our readers need and want to hear. We need your help in doing this. THE STAR subscribes to all major gay news services and columnists. Some of the best writers on and in the national 1rav community will appear on these pages­from the Jin~up at Stonewall Features to the reporting of Larry Bush from Washington. THE STAR is owned by the Montro e Voice Publishing Company, a t.hree-year­old gay-owned publishing company based in Houston that also publishes the Mont­rosl' Voice there and Dallas Ga) Newo, major gay community newspapers. The owners are committed to malting THE STAR the be~t of the thl'N! newspapers. Enjoy THE STAR, proud to now be a new part of the Austin San Antonio-area gay community. 2 THE STAR / NOV. 11, 1983 Gay Membership Splits Council of Churches Orthodox churches will "reaccess their situation," according to a spokesman, should the National Council of Churches approve membership eligibility for the Universial Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches. a 27,000 member denomination and haven for gay Chris­tiana, reports the Religious News Service. Withdrawing from the NCC is one of the options open to the nine orthodox members of the 31-member ecumenical council which voted on the issue Nov. 9. The November vote will grant only eligi­bility, not membership-that vote will be taken in May 1984. Orthodox representa­tive• say that an affirmative eligibility vote is enough for them to coneider separ­ating from the council. Claire Randall, NCC general secretary, eaid she is "very concerned" about the Orthodox view and the division that may result, and said that the governing board will consider all aspects of the question. The six Eastern and three Oriental orthodox religions have unanimoU8ly agreed to withdraw from NCC if the homo­sexual church is allowed membership. The Metropolitan Church was founded in 1968 by a former Pentecostal pastor for gay church goers. Bible Belt Gays in Baptist Conference Evangelical Outreach Ministries, a Southern-based pro-gay ministry, staffed a booth at a national Southern Baptist Conference on social justice issues held in Atlanta, October 6-8. Prominent over the EOM booth was a large sign proclaiming "Evangelical Out­reach Ministries, A Voice for Lesbian and Gay Men in the Bible Belt." The booth featured pro-gay religious and secular works for sale and free literature. Responses to this unprecedented event ranged from "shock" and "grim resigna­tion" to "glad you are here" and even "it's about time we started addressing this issue." EOM spokesperson David Chewn­ing stated, "We are elated at the warm reception we received." THE STAR Circufatlcl In Austin. San Arlionio and COrp.ia Chrilt Published every other Friday 3008-A Burleson Road Austin, TX 78741 Phone Austin (512) 448-1380 ....,,,.,_ Voice Publ• lllng Co CIRCUlA TION Monu-oTu hVeo S.cWe ( H4O 0U0i0to -n) •1 t 0 b0i0-w cNopk. l.y. ...N kly Oal • llay ,._. 8,000 coo,eo IONkly total Texas area 19 000 cop• WNKry. avg Company-.,.-. 3317 MonltON 8Mt lf306 How10n TX 77001. (713) S29-<l822 Contents copyright •1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg pubtu,,_, Ed Mart nez .,.n.fl"'fl odaor Lyt Han• -.rtWng d,tecro, Rico Young _ _,,.lnfl ,,_,,,go, Jon Chee!WOO<I c1asa t,od _.,,,."'fl Acel Clark •rt dil'Kror Jeff Brey g,•ptues Sonny Oav,s accow,t/ng "'-~--- -,...,,,. S.-vJca. lntetnat onal Gay Newt Aow,ey Pacif~ Nftt Syndicated FNture S.-wcN & Writen Jeffrey Wilton, Randy -Atfr.l.d StoneweU FNhlrn Synd.ca1e. Bnan McNaught. Joe POSTMASTER 5Md addresl conec:uona to 3317 MOf"ltroH t308, Houston TX 77006 $ul)ac.,ipt,on rat• WI l/S 111 NaJwl W'Jllt/ope $<il9 pet y .. f (52 6Nu9, S29pe,st.:montf\1(2eiatUNI o,$12Sperweett(J•• lllan 26 ....,_) Boclo - $2.00 -"- NatiOttal ~JaiftO ,.,,,-.senutrwe Joe OiSablto R vendell M.,._eb.ftG ee8 Sffi "-tenue N..., YOl'k 10011 (212) 242--68153 AfhwtJa,ng dfffmM every OINf Tueect.y 5:30pm. to, laaue - lolbwlng Frtd«y .-.Ing NoticetOedtt9'fJUrt l.ocal~ratelCNdule~Wfl --111983 Rapom#Oll.1')' ""The S~ dON not ... ume reapona briny for ~ dllffl• RNde,"I lf'lou1d alert "The Sta,.. to any -~ "fACES A fUN PLACE TO HE" Thursday, Nov. 24, Thanksgiving Day Bernice Schubert & Fran Marquis plus the staff at Faces PROUDLY ANNOUNCE Their Official Grand Opening of THE NEW FACES DISCO with Tony Lawson presenting '1he Judy Garland Show'' with Paulette Leigh as special guest $2 tickets in advance, $3 at the door * FREE * Buffet ~9pm Champagne 7-9pm.. Showtime 10pm 119 El Mio-SAN ANTONIO-(512) 341-4302 • Regular Subscription $30 • Trial Subscription $15 • Send me more information, please. Name ______________________ _ Add re . ...,_ __________________ _ City __________ State ___ Z,p _____ _ Type of Computer ____________ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Austin Councilman Named to Gay Black-Tie Dinner Advisory Board Austin City Councilman Mark Spaeth and several legislators are among those named to be on the Dallas Dinner Commit­tee advisory board. The group stages a black-tie dinner annually in Dallas to raise money for political candidates who favor gay-rights issues. John Thomas, chairman of the Dallas Dinner Committee, announced the advi­sory board members. They will serve for the next year and will be honored at the Human Rights Campaign Fund Black-Tie Dinner at the Fairmont Hotel in Dallas Nov. 19. Texas Legislature members named were state Rep. David Cain, state Sen. Lloyd Doggett and state Sen. Oscar Mauzy. Also named were state Agricultural Commis­sioner Jim Hightower. Other board members, mostly from the Dallas area, are John and Susan Albach, Roger Albright, Don Baker, James C. Barber, Jerry Birdwell, Ed Cloutman, Juanita Craft, Rev. Don Eastman, Dr. John and Harryette Ehrhardt, George Goodwin, Steve Gutow, Anne Hall, Adlene Harrison, Dallas City Councilman James You're Reading THE STAR Amenca·s Newest Gay Community Newspaper Hart, Rev. Mark Herbener, Dallas Coun• cilman Craig Holcomb, Eddie Bernice Johneon, Dr. Jesse Jones, Betsy Julian, Cay Kolg, Richard Longstaff, Ricardo Medrano, Ken and Linda Molberg, Judge Barbara Rosenber, Dallas Councilwoman Annette Strauss, Charlotte Taft and Dal­las County Commissioner Jim Tyeon. Virginia Apuzzo, executive director of the National Gay Task Force, New York Congressman Bill Green, Republican representative for New York's Manhattan Congreseional District, will share the speaker's platform at the fund-raiser. Apuzzo is known nationally for her tes­timony before Congress regarding homo­sexual rights. She recently appeared as an expert witness on the effectiveness of government programs relating to AIDS funding and patient care. She has appeared on Nightline, the Phil Donahue Show and 20120 as a spokesperson for the gay community. U.S. Rep. Green is co• sponsor of the Gay Rights Bill in Congrese and ie a member of the House Appropria­tions Committee, which is crucial for con­sidering AIDS funding legislation. The Dallas Dinner Committee's annual $150 per person event benefits the Human Rights Campaign Fund and the National AIDS Federation Lobby Project, accord­ing to Thomae. "Visions" is the theme of this year's dinner, borrowing from the lyrics of "Visions" by Mark Franklin Miles _of Dal­las. The 1982 dinner at the Fairmont raised more than $6000 for the Human Rights Campaign Fund. Invitations for the 1983 dinner have been mailed, according to Thomas, and advance ticket sales netted 240 responses; seating is available for 500 persons. Members of the Dinner Committee are Rick Aiehman, Jake Jacobs, Ray Kuc­hling, Jay Oppenheimer, Mike Stewart, John Thomas William Waybourn and Dickie Weaver' Thomae is also a member of the Huma~ Rights Campaign Fund Board of Directors in Washington, D.C. All proceeds from the din_ner will be used to elect candidates determmed to work to eecure the civil rightll of all persona, par­ticularly gay men and women, and by the National AIDS Federation Lobby Project to urge Congress to appropriate more fed. eral funds to find a cure for AIDS. S Commentary Sweat Socks: One Woman's tory By Sharon McDonald When it comes to sports, I have always been cordial but distant. AB a child, the full extent of my athletic repetoire was the repeated climbing of a single tree in which I would sit for hours daydreaming of an even less active childhood. I thought that once I grew up, I would be free of the daily pressures to run, jump, slide, hit and catch. Call me naive, but I looked forward to my adult years as a fruitful time for affairs of the intellect. Back then, women were allowed, no encouraged, to let their muscles atrophy in peace. But right around the time I would have begun living out my happy destiny as a sedentary grown-up, I fell in with an energetic group of women who called themselves by a strange new name: femi­nists. At first I thought their philosophy meant more choices for everybody: I could be either a chemist or a karate champion. What I didn't know was that the karate champion didn't have to study chemistry, but the chemist would have to take up some arduous sport to stay in the feminist ballgame. Only the language had changed since childhood. Yesterday's "Get your nose out of that book," has become today's "Get in touch with your body." This is a paradox of modem feminism that I find difficult to understand: nobody tells Rosie Casals to write a book, why do they tell me to play tennis? It's important at this point to explain that I don't dislike sports just because I'm no good at them, although that certainly helps. But simple ineptitude is a mere embarrassment that's easily forgotten. What's not easily forgotten is a lifetime of sprains, strains, cuts, scrapes, bruises, lac­erations, concussions and temporary embarrassments. I dislike sports because I hurt myself doing them, sometimes quite badly. I can fall and chip a bone on any type of surface you've got, from grass to concrete. The only time I can catch a ball that's hurtling straight at my unique and fragile face is when it knocks my last two fingers backwards three inches farther than they were ever meant to go. I think it's about time for feminists to face the fact that some women were just not meant to totter four inches off the ground on blades, wheels, a foor-long slab of wood or any­thing else. Women whom I would otherwise con­sider caring friends have tried to get me out there into the danger zone. "Look at you! You call yourself a dyke? Look at that arm. Where's the muscle?" "It's in my fingers. I type 90 words a ... " "You've got to start thinking about your health!" "I am. I'm staying inside where it's safe." "You don't know what you're missing." "Yes I do. Pain." It doesn't help that Louise is on the side of the athletes in this. One balmy evening Catholic Gay Ministry To Conduct Workshops New Way Ministry, a national Catholic gay ministry group, will sponsor and con­duct a tour of one-day workshops on "Homosexuality and Family Ministry" in six cities in Texas and Louisiana during November and December, they announced, Sr. Jeannine Gramick, SSND, who wrote the newly released Homosexuality and the CatholiC' Church, and Fr. Robert Nugent, SDS, A Challenge to Loue: Gay and Lesbian CatholiC'in the Church, a nun and priest, respectively, who have been engaged in ministry with lesbian and gay men since 1971, will conduct the work­shop, they said. The workshop will explore the sociologi­cal and pastoral dimensions of homosexu­ality, and is designed for educators, counselors, social workers, clergy, reli­gious, social justice advocates as well as family and friends of lesbian and gay Christians, they said. The San Antonio workshop is to be Nov, 29 at Incarnate Word Motherhouse, Cen• tennial Hall. 4515 Broadway. The Austin workshop is scheduled for Dec. 1 at St. Edward's University, Our Lady Queen of Peace Chapel, 3001 S. Congress. FREE PERSONALS IN THE STAR See Classified & Personals Form in the Back when she and I were in the first glow of new found love, she chanced to ask what sports I enjoyed. When I said none, that lovely period of idealized romance passed forever into history. Some people are so judgmental. Louise's childhoood had been a whirl• wind journey from championship this to championship that. From a modest begin­ning at prizewinning marbles, she went on to conquer her neighborhood at base­ball, ping pong, basketball, skating and so on. She once remarked to me what an easy transition it had been to go from GAA (Girl's Athletic Association) to GAA (Gay Activists Alliance) without even changing T-ehirts. As if our relationship wasn't tenuous enough, Louise decided that we needed to jog together every night. I reminded her that I considered achieving normal pos­ture an athletic event. She could not be moved. I said I'd think about it. True to my nature, I approached this subject first from an academic angle. I read all the books about jogging, and it was there that I learned about cramps, strains, faintness of breath and "overdo­ing it." I stopped reading. Next, I went shopping. After pricing jogging shoes, I came home with the aforementioned faint­ness of breath. This was soon followed by faintness of heart. The more I though about it, the stupider it seemed. Being an urban dweller, certain physical pursuits like karate or running do make sense to me. But jogging has no such intrinsic, pragmatic value. Whatself­repecting mugger responds to, "Back off, buddy, I'm a jogger"? Not does jogging provide you with an escape maneuver; it just doesn't work to jog away from an attacker. This is in sharp contrast to the more versatile sportofrunning, which can be utilized either to run from an attacker or to run to attack someone. Jogging, on the other hand, produces only two concrete results: stronger calf muscles and better wind, both of which are good for only one thing-more jogging. I presented my findings to Louise, but you can't tell her anything. So, with our frail relationship hanging in the balance, I purchased the proper shoes, baggy shorts and sweat socks and revised my will. I was ready. Louise glanced up from the television, lit another cigarette and said, "Not tonight, hon. let's start tomor· row." The next night she was meeting a friend for dinner and suggested we wait one more day. The following day she came home from work exhausted. "How about tomorrow night, sweetie?" she groaned. By now, all I can say is it's a wonder I've retained my sweet disposition and toler­ant, loving, giving, accepting attitude through all this. If in the name of femi­nism or health or God knows what else my lover and friends advocate chasing a ball around, or want to browbeat others into doing the same, I'd be the last one to say it's not an excellent use of time. I mean, if they want to move their con­versation to the level of debating the absorption capacities of different brands of sweat socks, I'd never suggest it was a step down. Some people might say these women have become sweaty, ill-dad, pant­ing bores, but not me. Goodness, if I let a little thing like watching my friends beome competitive over-achievers tum me into an unsupportive name-<:aller, well, what would that say about friendship? As for Louise and I, we have made a peace of sorts by discovering a physical activity we can do together. Although it is more private than a jog around the local park I will say that it has satisfied both our ~ants by providing exercise, sweat and exhaustion without requiring a trip to the emergency room. Until something bet­ter comes along, this will do just fine. McDonald, who liues in Los Angeles. 1s co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Ouutanding Work m Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay newspapers. Nov. 11, 1983 / THE STAR 3 Soap Greetings Well. here we are 'Soap" ,n Auston and San Anton,o Th,s lottle column each ,ssue ,s here to spread the dirt-and remind you of some of the events com,ng up at Auston and San Antonio clubs. -•- Happy 36th anniversary to Jose and Leo of El Jardin. -•- It's tome to start thmk,ng about Thanksgiving Bern,ce Shubert and Fran Marqu,s of the New Faces on San Antonio will have their Offo­cial Grand Opening Thursday, Thanksg,v,ng Night the 24th, with Tony Lawson presenting the "Jude Garland Show " Plus free buffet &- 9pm, free champagne 7-9pm. with the show at 10pm .• -•- A reminder that Dirty Sally s on Auston opens 8am every morning with Qu,nt,n and happy hour toll 2pm -•- Raw Power on SA. 1s now not1ust your Nu­Wave and Rock night club It's your Blttz night club Open nightly w,th DJs from New York and Sweden. -•- The 2015 on S A 1s determined to get you feel­ing real good with beer specials Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday nights -•- The El Jardin has been around San Antonio since the early 40s as we all know. (Where were you thirty years ago? Let the guys at El Jardin know we·re working up a spec,al ad) The El Jardin will be open Thanksgiving Day from noon on with Neille Hour" -•- Back to Austin and Back Street Basics They re having a Veteran's Day Mdlttary Ball th,s Sun­day. the 13th Get out your best dress or uni­form and report ,n Cash prizes for the best dressed m11ttary couples-and drink specials for everyone all weekend -•- Now, II you are looking for other reasons to have a celebration sometime on the next two weeks. here are several events to spark your 1magonat1on as an excuse for a party Fnday, Nov 11 David Ignatius Walsh was born today in 1872 So that means you can celebrate that your middle name ,s not Igna­tius. Actually old lgg e was a U S. Senator from Massachusets that became ,nvolved ,n a homosexual scandal ,n 1942 Seems poloce raided th,s New York male brothel" (bath­house? questions CA Tr pp in hos book The Homosexual Maine) and arrested manager Gustave Beekman They then offered Beek­man a deal for cooperation and he named Walsh as a customer Newspapers plastered Walsh·s name on the,r covers for weeks-and the Senate conducted a sensational onvestogatron-but 1t cleared Walash. Poloce then prosecuted Beekman on charges of ··sodomy." found h,m qu,lty and sentenced horn to 20 years ,n prison. He served every day of 11 And special thanks to Marton Gre,fs The Gay Books ol Days. from wh,ch we gathered some of this tnformatron F nday ,s also Veterans Day Monday, Nov 14 Herman Melv111e·s Moby Dick was publoshed today on 1851 And good God•. Joseph McCarthy was born today n 1908 But on a more relresh,ng note Arthur Bell. gay columnist for New Yorks Village Voice was born today 1n 1940 Tuesday, Nov 15 Pike discovered h,s peak 'oday ,n 1806 Wednesday. Nov 16 Al Capone was released from Jail today n 1939. three years early for good behavior Saturday Nov 19 Apollo landed on the moon today on 1969 And also, we'll have a full moon very late Saturday n,ght. (Actually, the moon ,s olhc,ally • lull" at 6·30am Sunday morning But It II be fuller· Saturday night than Sunday n,ght) Monday, Nov 21 Thomas Edoson invented the phonograph today on 1877 Th,s onvent,on was the first step 1n a long walk leading up to discos Wednesday. Nov 23 Bons Karloff was born today in 1887 Thursday, Nov 24. Ifs Thanksg,ving And we should be reminded that a three-course meal at Delmonico s ,n New York cost 12cents on th,s day ,n 183<4 4 THE STAR/ Nov. 11, 1983 ~.:!!!~az~.~!}_ness in Baghdad by the Bay The assassinations of Supenisor Harvey grateful for their friendship and awed by Milk and Mayor George Moscone in 1978 such fervent wooing. For many, it was the changed the course of gay activism in San first_ awa~eness of an enfranchisement for Francisco. Milk. on his third try, had been gay identity .. Itce~inl_y felt good to a then elected to the Board of Supervisors the recently•a1;1ved_ 1mm1gr~1;1t from New year before, becoming the first upfront York !1nd its C:1ty Council s monotonous gay elected official of a major city. Eupho- a_nd disheartening annual rejection of gay into the gay community seeking new members. There was alwayA some overlap between the memberships of the two groups. But the GGBA board and member• ship have long understood that the differ• ences between GG BA and the chamber are not only those of sexual orientation. The chamber ie controlled by, and works in the i!1terests of, the major downtown corpora• tions. GGBA, on the other hand, is a group of small merchants and professionals, On iBSue after issue, we would not be able to work with the chamber. Nevertheless. the chamber was certainly viewing GGBA in a new light. Under Dauer's successor executive director John Jacobs the rela'. tionship between the orga~izations improved to the point where, in 1983, when a new delegation from the GGBA board called upon Mr. Jacobs, we were able to secure an endorsement by the chamber of the gay employment rights bill, AB-1, cur­rently pending in the state legislature. On the Job in the police force. A March 1979 GGBA program on the subject drew an unusually large crowd, some of whom were angry over problems with permits and threa­t,> ned closings of baths and other sexually oriented establishments. A Chronicle front page headline the next day trum­peted: "Gay Businessmen Boo Police Chief." Since 1979, GGBA has played an active and continuing role in programs to educate police recruits and familiarize them with our community. In addition, we have supported efforts to recruit lesbian and gay officers into the San Francisco police force. na pr~vailed !n. the gay community. nghts . . Estabμs~ed activists experienced a ijUrge Late m 1977, I attended a monthly of optinusm and renewed energy in their GGBA membership meeting and unex­~ uest for social change and legal protec- pec~ly found myself elected to the board tion. Many who were previously inactive of dl.l"ectors for 1978. In the class of 1978 ~ere inspired by Milk's succe88 to get were a _number o! new faces, young and mvolved. energetic profeBS1onals, some emerging After Dan White's shooting spree, the from the_ closet for the first time. (Local mood changed from euphoria to bitter- gay business groups have found that ne&11, from hope to gloom, from a sense of many of their newer members do not genuine possibilities for positive change ?Clong to other gay organizations; the bus­to a despairing of such an eventual out- mess group provides a relatively comfor­come. The example of violence against a tab!~ •. n~npolitical environment for gay man, spread as it was across the front participation by some who feel threatened p~g_es a1;1d _the television screens, quickly by the conte~tiou,mess, both internal and elicited mutators. Violence against gay external. which seems inherent in politi­men and women, always a problem grew cal clubs.) It was this new energy which markedly in frequency, a trend further brought ~GBA firmly out of the closet at s~mulated by the implicit message con- the 1979 installation dinner. The dinner tained in the leniency of the Dan White program described the organization as yerdict. Many observed a new and pervad- "busi_neBS people who happen to be gay, mg sense of anxiety in the community. working together to build a better com- In that crucible of thwarW expecta- munity," It was the first time the word tions and ~ashed hopes, a ~ew strength "gay" had appeared i_n ~riting in_a GGBA was emerging from a previously unex- ?ocument. The descnption was sincere in pected place-San Francisco's gay busi- 1!1tent and not unsophisticated in its pub­neu community and its fledgling he re)ations message. "Working together chamber of commerce, the Golden Gate to build a better community" is about as Busineas Aasociation. Founded in 1974 una888ilable as motherhood and apple GGBA had kept a low and closeted profile'. pie. (The Tavern Guild. which dates back to The board was sworn in by supervisor Of continuing interest to GGBA has been the thorny problem of police/ gay relations. In my installation speech in 1979, I promised: "If there are incidents of police harassment of gay businesses, as has been _suggested in the press recently, GGBA will speak out and make it clear that anywhere, but least of all in San Francisco, such activity is not acceptable and will not be tolerated by this commun­ity." Police Chief Charles Gain, an acknowledged friend of the gay commun, ity, was at the dinner and demanded equal time. But the good chiefs friendship alone was not sufficient to combat homophobia Lazere is on the board of the San Fran cisco Industrial Development Authority. His column originates at the "Bay Area Reporter," a San Francisco gay news­paper. I I 1/\W~ t•WfR t ,_ivttT ¢0. the earl~ 1960s, was for many years the Hll!TY Britt, appointed by Mayor Fein-more • vi~1ble and politically-oriented •~nJustafewweeksbeforetothevacant Gay Mayor w,·ns orgamzation of bars, bar employees and Milk seat. My speech that evening-as 2315 San Pedro San Antonio, Texas 734-3399 related businesaes.) newly elected president-was an articula- K W t EI • San Francisco politicians saw the tion of the concerns I had heard expressed ey eS eCtlOn San Antonio's Only NEW-WAVE ROCK potential clout of GGBA, even before it by GGBA's board and membership. The B,Y Chris Church/Nile Scene was J>!!l'ce\ved ~y the membership of the tumultuous. and disturbing events v,a GPA Wire Service orgamzation Itself. GGBA's annual through which we had lived in recent dinner, at which the board of directors for months called for a more outspoken stance the new year is installed in office, was the on iaeues that could only be effectively first ~BA event I attended, back in 1977. pursued by an upfront organization. Prommentonthedaieandatthespeaker's Dunng 1979, two situations arose in rostrom were Harvey Milk (the proprietor which the newly-energized GGBA was of a camera shop) and George Moscone. able to flex its political muscle. An ano• Vocal in their support for this emerging nymous, aggrieved gay employee of gay constituency, the politicians received Oakland-bMed World Airways sent me a enthusiatic ovations from an audience copy of a memorandum, addressed by Immigration Reform Bill Dealt Death Blow By Larry Bush WASHINGTON, D.C.-The comprehen­sive immigration reform bill favored by House and Senate committee leaders was dealt a death blow by House speaker Tip O'~eill, who refused to allow the bill to come up for a vote on the grounds that Reagan had a private plan to veto the mea­sure. The political do-si~o, however, may not kill off the chances of a vote on a mea­sure to correct the decades-old antigay immigration exclusion. The House Hispanic Caucus. led by Rep. Robert Garcia (D-!',,Y.), is drafting a new immigration bill that it claims "will not discriminate" against any group. Garcia, like most of the Hispanic caucus. also is a supporter of gay civil rights, and his staff suggests that gays interested in seeing that the Hispanic bill include the antigay exclusion reform should contact Garcia. Among the congressional blocs expected to back the Hispanic bill, which is also being crafted with the help of Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), a key player in winning House appropriations committee funding for AIDS, are the Black Congressional Caucus and the Women's Caucus. Both thoae groups also are well disposed on eliminating antigay discrimination in laws. Garcia's office says that the new immi­gration bill should be ready to be intro­duced in January, and should also move to the floor by summer, in time for votes to be recorded for the 1984 elections. president Ed Daly to all employees. It included the line: "Thie company doesn't need hoodlums, racketeers (or) queers .... " GGBA wrote to Daly, but its protests were ignored. A Coors-type boycott was consi­dered A key problem was that World Air­ways was outside of San Francisco and subject to no law prohibiting discrimina­tion on the basis of sexual orientation. When World later opened a sales office in San Francisco, we immediately registered a complaint with the San Francisco Human Rights Commission. With the cooperation-and legal force-of the Com­mission, we were able to obtain a pledge of nondiscrimination from the recalcitrant Mr. Daly. The second confrontation of 1979 was of more lasting significance. After the White Night riots. the then-prP-sidentofthe pow­erful San Francisco Chamber of Com­me~ ce. Bi~l Dauer, wrote a scathingly cntical piece about the riot in the Chamber's widely-circulated magazine. In a television interview with gay journal­ist Randy Shilts, Mr. Dauer was asked about the importance of gay tourist dol­lars. '"There are more legitimate way& to get money," he replied, He was quoted in the San Jose Mercury; "The positive effects of the gay community? There are no positive effects," It seemed to me that, as our community's chamber of com­merce, it was the responsibility of GGBA to confront our downtown peers. A delega­tion of GGBA board members met with Dauer and explained its concerns. To Dau• er's credit, we never heard an anti-gay remark from him again, and not long after, he hired two well-known gay acti• vista to work for the chamber. The San Francisco Chamber, observing the rapid growth of GGBA membership, sent its well-commiasioned aaleepeoplf ' Richard Heyman, 48, overcame "newco­mer" status to become Key West's new mayor. With a 436 vote margin, Heyman defeated Richard A. Kerr by a vote of 3605 to 3169. Kerr's campaign streeAed "morality" and the fact that he is a "conch"-the islanders' term for a long-time resident. Hi., posters trumpeted, "Your vote will set the moral tone for our community." Heyman stressed tourism and preservation-one the main source of Key West's income, and the other the problem of inadequate utilities. Joe Balbontin, city commissioner and Kerr supporter, stated after Heyman·s vie• tory that news of a gay mayor "would bring more of them (gays) down here." Heyman countered by saying that the island's problems have nothing to do with sexual preference. "We have to preserve the character and charm of Key Weeteoit won't become another Miami Beach," he finished. AND BLITZ NITE CLUB! Featuring World-Wide LIVE Music and DJ's from New York and Sweden Monday and Tuesday Happy Hour 7-2, No Cover Charge Wednesday Ladies Drink Free Nite! - Thursday Beer Bust $3 Friday and Saturday Happy Hour 7-10 Sunday House Jam Session No Cover Charge ..H.._a ppy Hour 7-2 ~ TRAVEL CONSULTANTS ffiA~R, «:~~Jl 11~ fK~ ~V®L ~'xUJ~VA~ 'ITm~~ ~©u®UJ~1Yk~~ ffi£~ ~~~!'ir~l?:Tir~ A Full-Service Travel Agency for the Gay Community Houston Phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 . . NOV 11, 1983 / THE STAR 5 Looking for the Average Gay Texan and Black-Tie Dinners Commentary By Joe Beker I went looking for the "average gay Texan" recently. I wanted to find out if there was such e person. To be honest, I knew the answer before I started my search. I've been around long enough to know there is no "11.verege" any­thing, especially when it comes to gay men and women. But I thought that my search would make a readable story. It's fun to put the same question to dozens of different types of people-and see what kind ofreponses they make. In the newspaper business, we call this looking for a common thread. I also wanted to show the diversity of the people I interviewed and their comments. I put my question, "Is there such a thing as an average gay Texan?," to dozens of homosexuals across Texas. I wanted to make them stop and think for a moment on the subject-but not for too long. Spontaneity is a wonderful element to get into any good newspaper story. I wanted to get a lot of first impressions and thoughts from the people I interviewed. I was not disappointed. I got sponta­neity, diversity and that common thread connecting gay people in Texas that I was looking for. The results of my search can be found in the cover story of the new issue of The Aduocate, the national gay news maga­zine. It's now on sale throughout Texas, and I hope you pick up a copy. Now, before you start thinking that my column this week is merely an advertise­ment for my Aduocate story-let me say this. Yes, it is. I might just as well be honest! And you may ask, "So why didn't you write it for the THE STAR? After all, we could read it for free in there, whereas we have to pay for The Aduocate. So true, but you will be a better person for buying a copy of a gay publication for a change. And let's face it, isn't the combi­nation of me and The Aduocate's blushing pink classified ad section worth shelling out for? Which reminds me, I want everyone to take advantage of the STAR's free per­sonal ad offer. Might just as well throw in another advertisement here. What the hell! Why not throw in still another? Tickets are going fast for the gay social event of the year in Dallas. Well, maybe not THE gay social event, yet, but it is right up there with Razzle Dazzle Dallas and Halloween. The event is the black-tie dinner at the Fairmont Hotel to benefit the Human Rights Campaign Fund and the National AIDS Federation Lobby Project. Austin City Councilman Mark Spaeth is among Winter's the Time of Discontent Feeling down? Gaining weight? Sleeping more lately? You're not crazy, you're hib­ernating, reports Omni. Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health have discovered that some of us get bummed out as the days start shortening and don't come out of our blue funks until springtime. "I should have been a bear," complains one sufferer. "Bears are allowed to hiber­nate; humans aren't." The researchers say they've obtained successful results simply by plunking their patients down under lamps to pro• long daylight artificially. For a longer­term cure, they suggest imitating the birds by flying south for the winter. But don't go too far south. Down under, they get depressed, too, from June to November. those to be honored this year. Tickets are only $150 each. Can you believe I actually said "only?" But this is no ordinary evening. It's first class all the way. Most of the price of the ticket, of course, is being donated to two fine gay causes. The Human Rights Campaign Fund is a committee to helping our friends-friends of gay rights-stay in and get elected to Congress. The AIDS lobby project is work­ing to convince congressmen to continue funding AIDS research. I realize that $150 is a lot of money, but besides making a much-needed donation, you get an elegant evening. I love my Levi 50ls-and I love looking at hot men in Levi 50ls-but it sure is nice to get all dressed up every once in a while and do a different kind of partying. I mean it's been a long time since my junior prom. And it also sure is enjoyable looking at hot men in tuxedos and lovely ladies in their evening finest. The black-tie dinner is Nov. 19, and along with dinner and cocktails, there will be plenty of entertainment. Guest speak­ers will be U.S. Congressman Bill Green, Reppublican rep for New York's Manhat­tan Congressional District, and Virginia Apuzzo, executive director of the National Gay Task Force. Last Year's dinner raised more than $6000. If you would like more information or an invitation, call (214) 521-8919. John Tho­mas, chairman of the Dallas Dinner com­mittee, promises there will be nothing "average" about the eveninit. Now, if you are a sharp reader, you've probably noticed that I've managed to swing my column back to the original sub­ject I was writing about. Remember, I started this issue writing about my search for the average gay Texan. I did this so you wouldn't think that I was just rambling. I wanted you to think that I was trying to make a point. Again, the truth is that I had no inten­tion of trying to relate or connect my search story with the black-tie dinner. But on second thought, the two really do go together. It just goes to prove that there is nothing "average" about gay Texans. Why? Well, you will have to pick up a copy of The Aduocate to find out. Ol, I'll tell you all about it at the black­tie dinner. Austin's s. aust1n #1 Bar­Excellent Sound System & Music Programming 2828 Rio Grande at 29th 478-8782 OPEN 8AM DAILY with QUENTIN Happy Hour Prices plus $1 Screws & Bloody Mary's til 2pm Everyday Happy Hour 4-8 Wednesday Happy Hour All Day & All Night Thursday $1 Bar Drinks & Canned Beer 8pm to closing Saturday Liquor Bust 4-7pm, $5 Sunday Happy Hour Prices All Day Liquor Bust $5 Hot Dogs on the Patio Beer Bust $1 4-7pm Every Monday FREE BEER at 10PM An Austin Tradition Can We Talk about an excellent staff??? 6 THE STAR/ Nov. 11, 1983 Lesbos' Sappho Remains History's Romantic Enigma By Patrick Franklin Plato regarded her sohighlythathecalled her "the tenth muse," a name that bes• towed the status of a demi-goddess on her. Catullus quoted her poetry in hie own. The ancients carefully kept copies of her nine books of poems. But who was Sappho? The life of the woman whose very name is used as identi­fication for the love between women. and whoee birth on the island ofLesbos gives a !lame to the women who practice that love, 1s now loat. But "lost"' is too kind a word. The memory of Sappho brings with it a legacy of talent and genius that was too startling a burden to be borne by genera­tions of men for whom the love of woman for woman was vile. and who demanded that the place of women must be subser­vient. But she lived. More important. she wrote, and in such a way that the minds of her contemporaries were stunned by the perfection of her writing. Small-mmded men could burn her books and try to erase her memory, but not completely. To do so would have required that they censor or destroy many of the works of the great male thinkers who admired and quoted her. She was born tn the late 7th century B.C. When, exactly, is lost in time along with the date of her death We know the name of her father, Scamandronymus, who died when she was only six. and we know that he must have been a relatively wealthy man because of the position in society that Sappho enjoyed. She had three brothers, who, from the poetry that remains, must have been spendthrifts. Very little else of unquestioned truth remains from independent sources. What few hints can be a88umed come from the interior evidence of her poetry. She was a friendly correspondent with the poet Alcaeus, and the two of them were consi­dered leaders of the Aeolian school of poe­try. More important by today's standards is that she apparently presided over a femi­nine literary set at Mitylene, writing short poems to the charms of some of those women. It is on the basis of those small fragments that her highly regarded repu• tation rests. They show an unquestioned command of feeling expressed in perfect d1sciplined form ' It was this, her ability to combine emo­tional d'epth wtth classical purity, that made her not only the greatest woman poet of Greece, but one of the great poets of all time. Solon, hearing one of her verses recited, declared that he could not die until he had learned it. Passing references indicate that she was married and had borne a son. Still, those references never show the depth of feeling, the sincerity and the grace with which she described her feelings for her women friends. That bothered even the ancients, and they believed a legend that Sappho had thrown herself from the Leuc­adian Rock in fru1tration at having failed in love with a young man, Phaoan. Though the story was disproved by Roman times, it was continued by later writers who could not understand a woman who was complete without male companionship. She, in turn, frustrated other writers by refusing to consider the pa88ing scene. She ignored the eternal strife and struggle of the Greeks and their interminable civil wars. Her poetry concerned eternal values, those of love and the relationship of common people with the infinite. Per­haps the only complete poem that survives is a hymn to Aphrodite, the goddess of love. Her en Ure output of nine books of poetry was small, even for thoee times. In her own words, they were "roses, but roses all." There were no thorns or faded blos­soms in those books, and they survived at least until the destruction of the Library in Alexandria, completed by the Arabs in 640 A.D. The fathers of the church had little use for her poetry, and all copies of Sappho's verse were summarily burned when disco­vered. They offered no support to the views of those men, unlike the writing of other "pagans," and posed a real threat to the idea of male supremacy that the early church was so devoted to. Sappho seemed to be a dead iBSue. Even today, when we are left with only tantalizing fragments of what must have been an exciting body of work, theol~ prej-udicee appear. Robert Graves, writing the The White Goddess, a volume extolling the role of women in poetry and art, tells of hie discussion with a professor about the poe• try of Sappho. "Tell me, sir," he asked. "do you think Sappho was a great poet?" The Oxford don looked up and down the street to see if anyone was listening. "Yee, Graves," he whispered, "that's the trou­ble. She was very, uery good." Humanity can be proud that one woman in its early history stands as a monument Feature to the ability of all who face prejudice. At the same time, we must mourn for the vicious destruction of her art. Willa Cather said it best. "If of all the lost riches we could have one master res­tored to us, one of all the philosophers and poets, the choice of the world would be for the lost nine books of Sappho." Franklin, of Carmel, Calif., is the dire-;;;; of Stonewall Features. '1983 Stonewall Features Syndicate. 1.--- - Nov 11, 1983 / THE STAR 7 austin, tezas This Issue's Photo Stars Brian and Monte PHOTOS BY ED MARTINEZ 8 THE STAR/ Nov. 11, 1983 Gay Community Pop Culture and Gay Rights By Dan S~oeki only to see the problem, but to live it for For a long time, I have believed that the awhile. Alliance for Gay Artists in the Entertain­ment Industry, which recently presented its third annual media awards. expr~es!on of views on "public" issues in Hopefully, this submersion into the media like ~l_m and ~~sic offers a special realm of the artist allows us to emerge way fo: political actiVIsts to build support more sensitive to the problem, more open :,or t~~,r c~u~es_. If "culture" can be called to its discussion, and more likely to partici-pohtical, it 1s most powerfully so in pate in its solution. Were Karl Marx to thr~ se~ses. . comment, he would surely agree that "con- First, it ~an bnng attention to existing sciousness raising" is a necessary part of pro~lems m a way usually ignored in any revolutionary program. I contend ~amstream political discource, and thus that it plays an important role in gay mvol_ve us emotionally in the search for rights at the moment. solutions. Second, because of the artist's If we agree for a moment that culture 1!~om of expressi_on, he _o: she is not can speak politically, and its expre~sion hrm~ to the_ practical political agenda, can be used to promote a political move­solutions or VIews of the future. An artist ment, we are still left with a towering quee­defines pr?blems more freely and has tion. What is "gay culture?" The answer ~eate_r la_titu_de to define alternate poli- seems to elude all of us. Whether or not Cies, Institutions, lifestyles and moral there is a unique gay aesthetic, the crea­codes. Last, and most urgent, the artistic tion of a truly unique people or whether it addr~s~ to an au~e~ce is more direct than is only the product of a ghetto-ized sub­a po~tical one, 1t wms to the heart and community, are issues too large to tackle emotions, rather than the head and rea- in this column. son. _ Happily, though, another standard The result 1s that though the politician offers itself for this discussion one not ma,Y be ~ore "correct" in analysis, the based on who the artist is, but how effec­artist stnkes ':'- deeper c~rd, cre~ting pain tively that person portrays gay life. This or fear or self-identification, urgmg us not standard is the language adopted by the FREE PERSONALS IN THE STAR See Classified & Personals Form in the Back I ,. They are given to actors, writers and production staffs in film, TV and theatre for "the realistic portrayal of gay and les­bian characters and issues in the enter­tainment media." As did the earliest Oscars and Tonys, these awards cele­brated honesty and accomplishment with­out nervous nominees or declarations of best anythings. Instead, they celebrated the works that allowed audiences to expe­rience three-dimensional gay and lesbian people, that invited non-gays to expe­rience our richness and difficulties and that gave us the chance to see ourselves onstage as we are in our private lives. Among the most emotionally received theatrical tributes were the late Jane Chamber's play, Last Year at Bluefish Cove, and the ensemble of actresses who played it, Pat Carroll's solo performance in Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Ger­trude Stein, Vincent Price's powerful ver­sion of Oscar Wilde in the one-man Diversions and Delights, and Caryl Chur­chill's Cloud Nine, all productions of the Los Angeles Theatre. For what I consider the best film yet made about the pains and rewards of com­ing out, John Sayles' Liana won, and received special recognition for, the perfor­mances of Linda Griffiths and Jane Har­aren. In television, award went to Dynasty for the honest and routine way in which the gay character Steven Carring­ton was portrayed, and to PBS for its pro­duction of The Fifth of July, with Richard Thomas and Jeff Daniels as the stable gay couple-and probably the most "normal" people in the play. The awards evening was produced, writ­ten and directed by members of the Alliance and was easily more entertaining and crisply presented than the more famil­iar awards shows. I felt proud to be part of the family. The Alliance numbers about 250 members, its main percentage made up of gay professionals. In addition to the awards, year-round activities include monitoring productions that focus on gay life and working to eliminate stereotypes. There are risks to open members of the Alliance, as chairperson Chris U szler reminded the audience, the same risks faced by every person who chooses to reject the closet. Speaking for himself and the Alliance, Uszler affirmed that he would not be intimidated: "I am not discouraged .. . no, far from it, for I see a new generation of gays and lesbians emerging in our his­tory .... People who are willing to take risks, refusing to pay the emotional price of the closet, individuals who say 'I can be myself, openly and freely, and I will work in this town again!" Whatever their background, sentiment or sexuality, most artists speuk to their audience in metaphors rather than politi­cal tracts. If they are forced to create ste­reotyped charaters, most audiences will believe them and extend them to the real world. How short a time it is since any gay character found in the media was ridicu­lous and disturbed! But if gay characters were once one-dimensional and false, that is less true each year. The characters honored by the AGA were complex, honest and wholly within their dramatic context. Some were extraordinary gay icons, like Stein and Wilde, but most were ordinary people, like you and me. Their sexuality was merely an aspect of their makeup, not a constant source of struggle and conflict. When Americans can begin to see us in the m~ia in all our richness and variety, we begm to close in on our political goals. Dr. Siminoski is a political scientist and has been active in the gay rights move­ment for about a decade. He may be writ­ten at 1221 Redondo Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90019. ·•11983 Stonewall Features Srn- <!ica~~-, ~• .,.. .. , • • • , .....,,, Boy Scout Fights to Get Back Old Troop B;r Dion B. Sanders Vta GPA Wire Serivce BERKELEY, Calif.-Attorneys for the Boy Scouts of America said in October that they will appeal a court decision ordering an openly gay Eagle Scout to be reinstated as an adult scout leader. The California State Court of Appeals in Los Angeles upheld on Oct. 6 a lower court ruling that the BSA's 1981 ouster of Timothy Curran, 21, whose homosexual­ity was revealed in a newspaper article that year, was "arbritrary and capri­cious." BSA attorney Malcom Wheeler said from Los Angeles that the BSA maintains a policy of not permitting "girls, gays and the godless." Wheeler said that "one of the ideas of Scouting is to get kids out in the woods­removed from everyday problems, one of those problems being sexual relations." Curran disputed the assertion, saying that he found it "highly offensive. They obviously think that because I'm gay, I'm going to molest kids, and that's a garbage stereotype of gays in general and a per­sonal insult to me." Curran went on to assert the fact that most cases of child molestation involved girls being molested by heterosexual men. D~vid Park, BSA national director, said previous attempts "by several boys who refuse to acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being, as well as several females," were unsuccessful. In fact, one of the ten "Laws of Scout­ing" states that "a Scout is reverent ... toward God." A spokesman for the American Civil Liberties Union said, however, that that particular policy is unconstitutional, on the grounds that it violates an atheistic Scout's First Amendment rights. "The First Amendment, while it gives us the right to worship as we please, also gives people the right not to worship at all, if they so choose," the spokesman said. California Superior Court Judge Robert Weil ruled last July that the BSA must prove "a rational connection between homosexual conduct and any significant danger of harm to the association" before the BSA can expel anyone who is gay. Curran asserted that "it will be difficult for the Scouts to prove I'm immoral. They made me an Eagle Scout; they gave me the Order of the Arrow (one of Scouting's highest awards). They've gone to great lengths to prove how moral I am," Curran continued, "and now, they're trying to kick me out simply because I'm gay. There's no way I'll let them do that to me without a fight." Park responded, "We just don't think parents want homosexuals in the (Scout) troops." While national BSA leaders are opposed to Curran's reinstatement, local officials have openly welcomed Curran back. David Potter, scoutmaster of Troop 37 in Berkeley, said that "If you wanted to select a person who has been the ideal Scout, that person would be Tim Curran." In an editorial, the Oakland Tribune, the newspaper that made public Curran's gayness in 1981, said that when questi­oned about Curran being gay, nearly all of the members of Troop 37 said, "So what? We don't care." The editorial continued, "And why should anybody care?" The editorial concluded that the true measure of a Scout's worthiness is what he does in his capacity as a Scout, not what he does in his private life. ' '· Gay Porn Star Killed Falcon Studios model "Dick Fisk," 28, was killed Oct. 31 with his lover and the driver of another vehicle in an early morning auto accident in an Atlanta, Ga., suburb, Marietta. Fisk, whose real name was Frank Ricky Fitts, and his lover Billy Joe Howard, 22, Dick Fisk in Falcon photo were enroute home. As reported by Atlanta's Cruise News police said Howard was driving when hi~ car crossed the center lane and struck a pickup truck driven by Stewart Rhette Wallace, 31, of West Marietta. Fisk had recently appeared in the Man­date and Torso. His major film endeavor was Falcon's The Other Side of Aspen. He had recently been employed at Atlanta gay clubs. Moscone, Milk Assassinations Still Heated Issue By Dion B. Sanders Via GPA Wire Service SAN FRANCISCO-With the fifth anni­versary of the assassinations of Mayor George Moscone and openly gay city Supervisor Harvey Milk approaching, the Justice Department in late October refused to either confirm or deny a local TV news report that Attorney General Wil­liam French Smith had been urged not to prosecute their convicted killer. KGO-TV reported that Smith received a recommendation from the department's criminal division that former Supervisor Dan White, who shot Moscone and Milk to death at point-blank range in their City Hall offices on Nov. 27, 1978, not be prose­cuted on charges that he violated their civil rights. John Russell, a Justice Department spo­kesman, told The Sentinel, a local gay newspaper, that the White case "is still being examined by the criminal division and no new decision has been made." ' Russell added that although he does expect a decision to be reached soon, "I can't tell you just what soon is." A spokesman for U.S. Attorney Joseph Rusoniello expressed total surprise by the KGO-TV report. "Not only have we not heard about this so-called recommenda­tion, but if it had been given, we would have been informed." Rusoniello himself was quoted by the San Francisco Chronicle as saying that "I would expect to be the first to know (if a decision had been made). We have no information about any decision that has been made." The report was attacked by the longtime lover of Milk as "totally off-base." C. Scott Smith, the sole heir to the Milk estate, claimed that contrary to KGO-TV, "other news sources said a recommendation had not been made yet." Moreover, Scott Smith said, the report was broadcas, on a Monday when the Jus­tice Department received new information on the case "only that weekend." John Wahl, the attorney representing the Milk estate, was quoted by the Chroni­cle as saying that the KGO-TV report was "a trial balloon by the Justice Depart­ment." A KGO-TV spokesman said the station "stand• bJ out ator:v.'1 , ' • ~ , PLACE N E V E R Monday-Pitcher-$2 A Tuesday-Draft-25C C 0 V E R Wednesday-Beer Bust 7-11-$2 Thursday-Margaritas-75C Sunday-Beer Bust 8-10-$1 2015 SAN PEDRO 733-3365 SAN ANTONIO ., '·t!~~ ,~i~cr~ ~<°"'-""""',.. cJA ~an Antonio Tradition 106 Navarro San Antonio 223-7177 .,. The El Jardin opened in the early 40's and has improved with time like all great masterpieces. Now a San Antonio tradition, but better than ever. We will be open Thanksgiving Day from noon to 2am. Remember Nellie Hour every holiday and Sunday with 75¢ Bloody Marys, 75¢ Screwdrivers and 75¢ Beer Nov. 11, 1983 / THE STAR 9 Gays Busted for Wearing Police Uniforms on Halloween By Ernie Potvin Via GPA Wire Service LOS ANGELES-Two men were arrested for impersonating a peace officer after leaving Rafters bar in West Hollywood Hallowc-en weekend, following a uniform theme Halloween party. Von Scruggo was dressed as a Califor­nia Highway Patrolman, and his friend William Markley was in a Los Angeles Police Department Uniform. Neither of them wore authentic badges. utility belts, holstered weapons, handcuffs or batons. Scruggs said they were both membero of a uniform club. A,fter rounding the comer from the bar, Scruggs and Markley were surrounded by six CHP patrol cars, arrested and taken to the West Hollywood Sheriffs Station where they spent the night. Their cos­tumes were confiscated, and they were charged with the misdemeanor which car• ries a maximum penalty of up to six­month's imprisonment or a fine of $500 or both. Scruggs said some of the officers tried to provoke them with name calling and harassment, but they refused to respond to it. He said that the clothing had been pur­chased from a uniform store that services CHP and LAPD officers, and explained You·re Reading lliE STAR America's Newest Gay Community Newspaper how they told the sales clerk they were not sworn officers when buying the patches . The store swore they did not sell the uni­forms without the purchaser showing the proper ID. An entirely different picture was painted by Sgt. Norris Soloman of the LAPD who coordinates relations with the city's numerous private patrols. Sgt. Solo­man said that he is unaware of any law prohibiting the sale of the uniforms to civ­ilians, and he knows that all the uniform saleo companies do it. He said hio office asks private guards to mix-match the pie­ces so they aren't confused with a sworn officer's. Nevertheless, an individual nightclub guard may try to dress identical to the LAPD uniform, and when he is dis­covered, they w:ill tell him to change it. "Wearing of a police officer's uniform may or may not be legal," said Soloman. "It depends on whether or not there was intent to deceive the public." He cited the movie industry as the nota­ble exception. Next we checked w-ith Western Costume, the film industry's largest supplier, and got two conflicting responses. One of the higher-ups in the men's rental department said they "most emphatically do not rent police uniforms to the public." He said they get lots of requests for cops, Nazis, nuns and priests, which they will only supply for bonafied theatrical use. Another employee said that's not true. "They're just concerned about making costumes that might be considered in bad taste. As for uniforms. there's ways to get around it. We'll change some little detail, like the width of the pant striping or a slightly different badge, and let them go out." As for priests, Western Costume made up an absolutely exquisite Pope for one Halloween celebrant who apparently was not arrested for impersonating the Pon­tiff. Neither were any of the costumed cops at the Uniform Sabeth party held at Duane's, another gay bar, the night fol­lowing Scruggs and Marldey's arrests. 10 THE STAR / Nov. 11, 1983 Star Classified Fourteen-Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat ---- NOV. NOV. 11 12 NOV. NOV. NOV. NOV. NOV. NOV. NOV. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 NOV. NOV. NOV. NOV. NOV. 20 21 22 23 24 For addibonaJ 1of0<m1t,on or phone numbers tor eowents listed ~ow looll: ,o, tne apcntonng orgenll.lition under ·org1na1bons n the The Star's Directory Selected Events First Week aFRJDA Y: Veterans Day, Nov. 11 Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Full moon, 6:30am, Nov. 20 •IN 1 WEEK: Thanksgiving, Nov. 24 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 9th National Conference, "The Challenge of 1984: Together We Can Make a Difference," San Diego, Nov. 25-27 • IN 2 WEEKS: 5th Memorial Harvey Milk/ George Moscone March, San Francisco, Nov. 27 •IN 2 WEEKS: Monthly meeting of Austin Lesbian/ Gay Political Caucus, 7:30pm, Nov. 29, Courthouse Annex •IN 2 WEEKS: First day of Hanukah, Dec. 1 •IN ts WEEKS: Winter begins at 4:31am, Dec. 22 •IN 6 WEEKS: Christmas, Dec.25 • IN 11 WEEKS: Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference, J an. 27-29, Houston • IN 26 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 • /.V 31 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anniversary of Stonewall uprising, national slogan "United & More in '84," June 15-24 • IN 36 WEEKS: Democratic National Convention, San Francisco, July 16-19 •IN 40 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug 19, San Francisco • IN 41 WEEK S: Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens m Houston Aug. 28, lasting to Sept. 2 ANNOUNCEMENTS BustNESS OWNE.AS We hst free each ..... ,n this directory communitY organ zati.-ons plus ou,tnesses Nf'Vmg as Qlatrlbutlon pc)tnts to, THE STAA e lndlcatN 1NI '"" • • STAR dlalrlbuUon point EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED STRINGERS WANTED The Star" seeks free-lance news writers ,n Austin and San Antonio tor assignments Send samples of your work to Henry McClurg. "The Star," 3008-A Burleson Rd , Austin. TX 78741 GAY BARS ORGANIZATIONS iEL.£crEO NAT10""4AL 0AOANIZAT10N$- Gey Pr ... Auociauon-POB 33605. WuNngton. DC 20003- (202 387·2430 Gay Rigt\11 Natkn\al Lot,t,y--,fl08 ,aw Watt!lnglc,n DC 20013--(20215"6-1101 Human Right1 Campa.on Fund-POB '396. W•ho lngton. DC 2001:,. (202) 5"&-202$ Who says you can't buy butchness. Get The latest Gay Community News Every Other • R ~~Y The Star in Every Other Friday, The Star gives you the latest local and national gay community news-the events that made the news during the past two weeks. Look for us at clubs and shops in Austin, San Antonio and Corpus Christi Te.x• Qay1L.e,.an Tatk FOf'c--POB AK. Denton 7&201 - (117) 317-8218 AUSTIN-Auat, n Letbian/Gay Pohllcal Caucu1- POB822. 71787-t7.t-2717 mN11 last Tu• . 7.30pm. Comm1a;oners Cour1. Cour1houH Annex CORPUS CHRIST/- Gay Bartenders A11oc1at1on -c/o Zodiac lounge. 817 Staptee- 883-7753 Metropolftan Community Church-Clo Unitar• Ian Church. 3125 Horne Rd- 851 -9698 SAN ANTONIO- ~ -­~~ uman Righi.I Comm1t1N- 654--007•. Gay Swilchboard - 733--7300 Lambda AA- 1312 Wyoming-67.t-2819 ~:;:c,an & Gay People 1n Med,Cfne- Box 2900.tl, ?~~",'f'IO Gay Alliance- Box 12063. 78212- By Tycho PERSONALS CONTACT, FANTASY, FUN Wrestling & more. 500 members nationwide lnfop1xpak $3. NYWC, 59 W 10th. New York, NY 10011. PRIVATE GAY CLUBS Fortunes For Friday evening. November 11, 1983, through Friday evening. November 25, 1983 ARIES-All of that incredible sexual energy that started out the month has become inspirational. Your desires may not be lessened, but your mind is working overtime on creative projects. You've been blocking them up 'Iii now! Create your own life! TAURUS -Making things right with your "significant other" may not be as easy as you thought. It looks like this is a process that's going to take some time and outside help-a trusted friend or therapist may be in order. Look to the larger and long-run picture. GEMINI- The impact of AIDS has given most of us a new outlook on fast and frantic sex; so, when it comes, as it's bound to for you this week, consider the possibilities. Maybe you can have your cake and eat it, too. Act, but act intelligently. CANCER-"Men at home" is the theme this week. Whether it's father, brother, lover, boss or whatever, there will definitely be a man around the house who wasn't there before. He will affect you deeply, completely and require something of you that could change your life LEO- Stop and go. Yes and no life offers a series of interesting contrasts this week. The serious side of things is serious, indeed, requiring lots of concentration. The lighter side 1s so light and amusing that you're tempted to laugh it all away. VIRGO- The search 1s on. You're digging deep and far and wide for answers. Don't take the first one Iha: comes along. Illusion 1s easy to grab hold of. and that's the danger this week. Let 1t pass by until a very firm reality sets in LIBRA- Love comes knocking at your door. This may be someone that you thought was completely out of the picture or someone you never imagined as a lover. The dance of romance may begin quite suddenly- as if you saw a familiar face for the very first time. SCORPIO- You're hoping that no plans are being made for a surprise birthday party; while you generally like that kind of attention, you're just not In a celebrating mood right now. You'd prefer a very quiet evening with a few people you're closest to-so tell them so! SAGITTARIUS- Can love and business go hand in hand without some disastrous results? You'd like to think so. Someone you're involved with in a working relationship could become something far more Things could become quite complicated CAPRICORN - The blaze 1s now a conflagration. Passion 1sa 24-hour affair Body and mind are in a state of rapture That's the possibility; let it happen To do so requires showing all the sides of your personality and being completely open. AQUARIUS Last week's obsession ,s tempered You have so many friends around that there's simply not time to indulge your private intrigues. All these welcome people surrounding you gives your life a holiday feeling. Celebrate• PISCES- So business affairs seem to be putting a damper on your travel plans: 1f the business matters look genuinely solid and profitable. you may want to forget travel for a while. If they're simply pie in the sky, get all those free maps and travel books •IN3 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE NOV.11,1983/THESTAA 11 e Club Authn Baths-308 W 16th---.t7&-7988 SAN ANTONIO- SERVICES, ETC. "siN ANTON10- · - Sta,-737-o017 e Club San Antomo-1802 N Main Av-735-2417 e Executrve HM.Ith Club- 723 Av 8 225-8807 AUSTJN- You're Reading lliE STAR STAR CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Placing a • PERSONALS ? Read this: Personals? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words m bold and up to 15 total • ANNOUNCEMENTS words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 are 30¢ • CA S each.) R & BIKES HOW LONG? Free Personals can be placed for • EMPLOYMENT & one, two or three issues at a time-but no longer. JOBS WANTED To renew requires re-submitting the form. • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll • SERVICES • TRAVEL assign you a Blind Box Number. The answers to RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2. your ad will be sent to us and we will then Additional regular words 30¢ each. confidenti~lly forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 Minimum charge $3. for each issue the ad runs but replies will be DEADLINE: 5:30pm Monday for Friday's forwarded as long as they come m. newspaper. ANSWERING A ~LIND BOX NUMBER: Address LONG TERM ADVERTISING Run the I your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o The Star, same ad 4 issues or longer, pay the full 3008-A Burleson Rd.! Austin, TX 78741. Enclose no run in advance, and make no copy money. Your letter will be forwarded unopened and changes during the full run, and you can confIdent1ally to the advertiser. deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 issues CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: or longer under the same conditions and All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box you can deduct 25%. charges must be paid in advance OR you can CHARGE YOUR AO; All classifieds must charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill for be paid in advance OR you can charge classifieds. . your classified to MasterCard or Visa. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will ~e We do not bill for classifieds. charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone tn PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who Classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, will be charging to MasterCard or Visa 9am to 5:30pm. The Free ~ffer does not apply to can phone in classifieds to (512) Personals phoned m. You will be charged the same 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to rate as other types of Classifieds. 5:30pm. _________ (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals) (free or 30¢Iword) (free or 3()¢/word) __ _ (30¢/word) ___ _ (30¢/word) ___ _ (30¢'word) bold headline at $2 ___ _ __ words at 30¢ each ___ _ Blind Box at $3 per issue ___ _ Total ___ _ (use add1honal paper 1f necessary) Name Address ____ _ Run ad -~----tssues Amount enclosed ( a check o money order, o cash In person a VISA charge o MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # ~------ exp date ___ _ Mail to The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741 WHICH, OC4R BERNIE:, CAN ONLY MEAN c»JE 'THING! fLUMRI! 12 THE STAR / Nov. 11, 1983 'J \ Back Street Basics austin,tx 611 E. 7th 477-3391 VETERAN'S DAY 1st Annual Milita1Y Ball Sunday, Nov.13th Get Your Best Dress or Uniform Out Cash Prizes for Best Military Dressed Couples Drink Specials All Weekend NEW-MONDAY Nu-Wave Night 75¢ Well Drinks All Night WEDNESDAY Dynasty Night 2-for-1 Well Drinks All Night
File Name pdf_uhlib_783846406_n001_ac.pdf