Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979
File 004
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 004. 1979-07-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/682.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-07-23). Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 004. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/682

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 004, 1979-07-23, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/682.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979
Alternate Title Austindyke, Vol. I, No. 1, July 23, 1979
Date July 23, 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 27665192
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript this kind of thing to trial does do is assure us that we can't keep straights out of our places (if we ever get any). A glance at the newspaper any day will demonstrate that the laws are made and enforced to benefit those in power, and that ain't us. In fact, the biggest effect I can see of this business is putting more money, time, and energy into the legal system—which is a male system, one scarcely designed to protect, and certainly not to benefit, women—and especially lesbian women. Of course the gay lawyer from San Francisco says that the right to dance at the Cabaret is not the point, but that now people can see that "gays...are just plain folks like anyone else," and that "the whole point is one of changing people's minds...." How naive can you get? Lesbians, at least politically conscious lesbians, are certainly not "just like anyone else." And even it we were, we ought to know that you don't get people to love you by taking them to court. - Ann Azolakov REVIEWS Songs of Fire: Songs of a Lesbian Anarchist by Kathy Fire. Folkways Records FS 8585 Kathy Fire doesn't call herself a singer or a musician but quotes a friend as saying that what she lacks in talent she makes up for in energy. These songs are roughly done (recorded in a one-time-through, one-hour studio session) but tremendously exciting because they deal directly with things that go on in our real lives. Not all are readily singable, though some are, but their content rings true, and that's what will get your adrenalin up. She sings about lovers, lesbian mothers, the FBI, the dream of living in the country, coming out, and the fight against the patriarchy. The effect of the album, though rousing, is vaguely unsatisfying, but the lack of satisfaction comes not from the songs or their delivery, but from the truth they tell: that lesbians who work for real change in this world are involved in a hard, frustrating, grinding fight in which the bright moments are not easy to find. But Songs of Fire is not depressing. Instead it is full of courage and encouragement. There are some victories; there are some things to laugh about; we can—sometimes—count on each other, as friends, as lovers, as sisters in struggle. This is a real lesbian album that says what it means. - Ann Azolakov Debutante by Willie Tyson. Urana Records, Division of Wise Women Enterprises, Inc. Willie Tyson's most recent album is a strong, exciting collection of feminist songs which are entertaining lyrically, interesting musically, and well-delivered. Tyson's BobDylanesque lyric style which dominated her first album still shows up here, though the messages of the songs come through more clearly than on the previous record. My favorites in this collection are "Did You Say Love?" and "Witching Hour." The first is a sardonic look at what women do to try to please their lovers when the lovers turn out to be less than expected. The second is probably the most emotionally powerful feminist song yet recorded. It will give you goose bumps and send you off looking for someone to defy. I have yet to see any woman remain unmoved by it. It alone would be worth the price of the record, but fortunately the other songs are high quality, too. The only ambivalence I feel about Debutante is that from the title and the fact that Willie Tyson appears in drag on the cover one would expect the album to represent the singer's coming out as a lesbian. Although there is lesbian content in some of the songs (one assumes), the album is really much more a straight feminist record than a lesbian one. - Ann Azolakov The Two of Them by Joanna Russ. Berkley Publishers, 1978; now in paperback also. Joanna Russ's new science-fiction novel is not another Female Man, but it's a real winner just the same. Its protagonist, Irene Waskiewicz, is a trans-temporal agent, who, with her co-worker Ernst (a "good man"), is working on a Moslem planet in another possible world. She is outraged at how women are treated there and does manage to rescue Zubeydeh, a 12-year-old girl, though she has to leave other oppressed women behind. Zubeydeh, though she chose to leave, carries her Moslem perceptions with her. She is hostile to Irene, often preferring Ernst. Her perceptions of what goes on between Irene and Ernst enable Irene to see Ernst in a new way (e.g. she insists Irene and Ernst must be married, though (Irene believes) they are not), and to realize that "good men" are oppressors like the rest.
File Name uhlib_27665192_v001_n001_003_ac.jpg