Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979
File 003
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 003. 1979-07-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/681.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-07-23). Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 003. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/681

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 003, 1979-07-23, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/681.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979
Alternate Title Austindyke, Vol. I, No. 1, July 23, 1979
Date July 23, 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 27665192
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript fourth, or fifth cousins. -I consider everyone my family. -I think of lesbians - those in the lesbian community, not those in the closet - as family because I feel at home with them. They accept things about me that men and their women don't. We can disagree without being enemies. LETTERS t, OPINIONS WHAT'S GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES TELLING THE COMMUNITY ABOUT US? GCS was scheduled to make a presentation (billed as "Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Gay Rights and the Gay Community but Were Afraid to Ask") to an Austin Community College sociology class. Since I work at ACC, I thought I'd go. GCS sent a panel consisting of three lesbians and two gay men. All looked pretty average, not dressed up, on the young and studenty side—no dykey women, no very effeminate men, but no super-straights either. All were Anglos. They introduced themselves and asked for questions. Questions were rather slow in coming and it made for a very lackadaisical presentation. I suspect students were still "afraid to ask." The general thrust of many answers to questions was that homosexuals are just like other people except for sexual orientation. Since I strongly disagree with this, at least as far as lesbians go, this did not please me; however, I realize that it is probably the view of more homosexuals than mine is. There were a few interesting moments: Weirdest question (from a middle-aged woman): You're all obviously attractive young people. What do you do when someone of the opposite sex is attracted to you? Most interesting answer: One gay man on the panel said that by the time he was six he, taught by his extremely homophobic father, could pick out some women as lesbians and had learned co be afraid of them— although he had no idea what a lesbian was. My favorite answer: The brief comment of one lesbian that her feminism did have something to do with her lesbianism, that it was her best solution in a patriarchal society. Such perspecitives were never otherwise mentioned. Basically, I feel that the panel managed to convey neither the joy and excitement homosexuals feel about being gay nor the pain and fear we feel at homosexual oppression. Both came out somewhat in answers, but not strongly enough, I think, to make a lasting impression on anyone who didn't already know these things. I was surprised at how ill- informed the panel was about laws affecting homosexuals (on which there were several questions); I think GCS should make an effort to have at least one person know a lot about this. I feel that not having a formal presentation made for something of a zoo atmosphere. "Here we are! Real live queers!" Of course there is definitely going to be an element of this anyway, but there could be much, much more in the way of education. However, let's hope that did some good. I know that, in my case, seeing two women I actually knew to be lesbians at a meeting both scared me and had something to do with my coming out two years later. But for the future, I would strongly suggest to GCS that they have a more organized and formal presentation, that they have more diversified panelists, that they make more of an effort in the presentation to acknowledge differences of viewpoints among homosexuals, and that they have someone well-informed on laws affecting homosexuals. I think that in this way they could have a less awkward and more effective presentation, and make much better use of the opportunity to inform the general public about homosexuality and homosexual oppression. - Anne Peticolas CABARET DECISION: CAUSE FOR REJOICING? It's hard to imagine lesbians wanting to go dance in a straight disco; most of us have enough contact with straights all day without choosing to be with them during our few recreational hours. But in any case, the Cabaret decision doesn't make it any easier for any lesbians who want to dance there. The Cabaret says it hasn't changed its house rule, and the fine they got was a slap on the wrist. But what taking
File Name uhlib_27665192_v001_n001_002_ac.jpg