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Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979
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Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 001. 1979-07-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 8, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/679.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-07-23). Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/679

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979 - File 001, 1979-07-23, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 8, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/687/show/679.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Austindyke, Vol. 1, No. 1, July 23, 1979
Alternate Title Austindyke, Vol. I, No. 1, July 23, 1979
Date July 23, 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 27665192
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript c51l.USTINDYKE Vol. I No. l Jul 23 1979 LESBIAN RAP & DISCUSSION GROUPS TO FORM We are three lesbians who wish to begin a lesbian rap group sometime in September. We would like to open the group up to any lesbian wanting a politically/emotionally supportive atmosphere in which to explore topics relevant to lesbians, e.g. relation­ships with wimmin, lesbian feminism, etc. (and a whole range of unexplored territory). Any lesbian interested, call Marie at 472-4520 after August 1st. The three of us would like to explore lesbian politics on a discussion level. Topics in mind include lesbian separatism (its many definitions and practicality). We would also like to explore topics originating from some of the questions and theories proposed by Mary Daly in her book Gyn/Ecology. We are considering forming two groups: the above rap group and also a political discussion group. Call same name and number for information or ideas; after August 1st. - Marie, Dheena, Kathy UP FOR DISCUSSION: LESBIAN FRIENDS AS FAMILY In many ways my lesbian friends have been like a family to me, and I'm cer­tainly closer to them than to my family of birth for many reasons. Lesbian friends have lent and given me money, given me clothes, lent me cars and given me rides, given me places to stay. I can count on my lesbian friends in ways that I never have been able to count on my straight friends, now or when I considered myself to be straight. However, I have never had exactly the same kind of intimate friendships with women, except my lover, since I've been a lesbian as I had with straight women. I think this may come from the "family" nature of the lesbian community too. One is close to family members in different ways and with different expectations than to non-family members. In some ways one is much closer but in some ways much more distant. This may be because both families and lesbian commuunities are rather in­voluntary groupings. Sure, I choose to be with lesbians rather than anyone else, just as some people choose to be with their families. But I don't have a choice about who is a lesbian any more than I have a choice about who my parents, brothers, or sisters are. I think this closeness of our ties and the reliance we place and want to place on each other, together with the great variety of politics and opinions among les­bians, may be responsible for the high levels of anger and tension that often exist between lesbians. We are each other's families--for better and for worse--and there's a lot of both. - Ginger AUSTINDYKE asked several lesbians for their comments on the idea of lesbian friends as family . --I don't consider just any lesbian as a family member because she's a lesbian, but the lesbians I 'm close to I do, in some ways deeper than my own blood family . There are some common problems that make some kind of bond. --Some lesbians are like my family . The emotional bonds are closer than just casual friendships. But I wouldn't claim some lesbians as third, (cont'd on p. 2) Welcome to AUSTINDYKE! We hope to provide a way for Austin area lesbians to express views, let each other know about things, etc. We welcome short contributions on any topic of interest, as well as reviews, coverage of any lesbian event you happen to attend, and so on. Please send these to us at: P.O. Box 3374, Austin, Texas 78764. Please let us know how and whether you want your article signed. The OUR TIME HAS CCME collective are~Agi ving us their subscription monies and we will no~t continue all paid-up subscriptions to OUR TIME HAS COME for the appropriate time period.11" A subscription blank for AUSTINDYKE will be found on page 4. Copy deadline for the next (September) issue is August 20th. fourth, or fifth cousins. --I consider everyone my family. --I think of lesbians - those in the lesbian community, not those in the closet - as family because I feel at home with them. They accept things about me that men and their women don't. We can disagree without being enemies. LETTERS & OPINIONS WHAT'S GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES TELLING THE COMMUNITY ABOUT US? GCS was scheduled to make a presentation (billed as "Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Gay Rights and the Gay Community but Were Afraid to Ask") to an Austin Community College sociology class. Since I work at ACC, I thought I'd go. 2 GCS sent a panel consisting of three lesbians and two gay men. All looked pretty average, not dressed up, on the young and studenty side--no dykey women, no very effem­inate men, but no super-straights either. All were Anglos. They introduced themselves and asked for questions. Questions were rather slow in coming and it made for a very lackadaisical presen­tation. I suspect students were still "afraid to ask." The general thrust of many answers to questions was that homosexuals are just like other people except for sexual orientation. Since I strongly disagree with this, at least as far as lesbians go, this did not please me; however, I realize that it is probably the view of more homosexuals than mine is. There were a few interesting moments: Weirdest question (from a attractive young people. sex is attracted to you? middle-aged woman): You're all obviously What do you do when someone of the opposite Most interesting answer: One gay man on the panel said that by the time he was six he, taught by his extremely homophobic father, could pick out some women as lesbians and had learned co be afraid of them-­although he had no idea what a lesbian was. My favorite answer: The brief comment of one lesbian that her feminism did have something to do with her lesbianism, that it was her best solu­tion in a patriarchal society. Such perspecitives were never otherwise mentioned. Basically, I feel that the panel managed to convey neither the joy and excitement homosexuals feel about being gay nor the pain and fear we feel at homosexual oppression. Both came out somewhat in answers, but not strongly enough, I think, to make a lasting impression on anyone who didn't already know these things. I was surprised at how ill­informed the panel was about laws affecting homosexuals (on which there were several questions); I think GCS should make an effort to have at least one person know a lot about this. I feel that not having a formal presentation made for something of a zoo atmos­phere. "Here we are! Real live queers!" Of course there is definitely going to be an element of this anyway, but there could be much, much more in the way of education. However, let's hope that did some good. I know that, in my case, seeing two women I actually knew to be lesbians at a meeting both scared me and had something to do with my coming out two years later. But for the future, I would strongly suggest to GCS that they have a more organized and formal presentation, that they have more diversi­fied panelists, that they make more of an effort in the presentation to acknowledge differences of viewpoints among homosexuals, and that they have someone well-informed on laws affecting homosexuals. I think that in this way they could have a less awkward and more effective presentation, and make much better use of the opportunity to inform the general public about homosexuality and homosexual oppression. - Anne Peticolas CABARET DECISION: CAUSE FOR REJOICING? It's hard to imagine lesbians wanting to go dance in a straight disco; most of us have enough contact with straights all day without choosing to be with them during our few recreational hours. But in any case, the Cabaret decision doesn't make it any easier for any lesbians who want to dance there. The Cabaret says it hasn't changed its house rule, and the fine they got was a slap on the wrist. But what taking 3 this kind of thing to trial does do is assure us that we can't keep straights out of our places (if we ever get any). A glance at the newspaper any day will demon­strate that the laws are made and enforced to benefit those in power, and that ain't us. In fact, the biggest effect I can see of this business is putting more money, time, and energy into the legal system--which is a male system, one scarcely designed to protect, and certainly not to benefit, women--and especially lesbian women. Of course the gay lawyer from San Francisco says that the right to dance at the Cabaret is not the point, but that now people can see that "gays ..• are just plain folks like anyone else," and that "the whole point is one of changing people's minds .••• " How naive can you get? Lesbians, at least politically conscious lesbians, are certainly not "just like anyone else." And even it we were, we ought to know that you don't get people to love you by taking them to court. - Ann Azolakov REVIEWS Songs of Fire: Songs of a Lesbian Anarchist by Kathy Fire. Folkways Records FS 8585 Kathy Fire doesn't call herself a singer or a musician but quotes a friend as saying that what she lacks in talent she makes up for in energy. These songs are roughly done (recorded in a one-time-through, one-hour studio session) but tremen­dously exciting because they deal directly with things that go on in our real lives. Not all are readily singable, though some are, but their content rings true, and that's what will get your adrenalin up. She sings about lovers, lesbian mothers, the FBI, the dream of living in the country, coming out, and the fight against the patriarchy. The effect of the album, though rousing, is vaguely unsatisfying, but the lack of satisfaction comes not from the songs or their delivery, but from the truth they tell: that lesbians who work for real change in this world are involved in a hard, frustrating, grinding fight in which the bright moments are not easy to find. But Songs of Fire is not depressing. Instead it is full of courage and en­couragement. There are some victories; there are some things to laugh about; we can--sometimes--count on each other, as friends, as lovers, as sisters in struggle. This is a real lesbian album that says what it means. - Ann Azolakov Debutante by Willie Tyson. Urana Records, Division of Wise Women Enterprises, Inc. Willie Tyson's most recent album is a strong, exciting collection of feminist songs which are entertaining lyrically, interesting musically, and well-delivered. Tyson's BobDylanesque lyric style which dominated her first album still shows up here, though the messages of the songs come through more clearly than on the previous record. My favorites in this collection are "Did You Say Love?" and "Witching Hour." The first is a sardonic look at what women do to try to please their lovers when the lovers turn out to be less than expected. The second is probably the most emotionally powerful feminist song yet recorded. It will give you goose bumps and send you off looking for someone to defy. I have yet to see any woman remain unmoved by it. It alone would be worth the price of the record, but fortunately the other songs are high quality, too. The only ambivalence I feel about Debutante is that from the title and the fact that Willie Tyson appears in drag on the cover one would expect the album to represent the singer's coming out as a lesbian. Although there is lesbian content in some of the songs (one assumes), the album is really much more a straight feminist record than a lesbian one. - Ann Azolakov The Two of Them by Joanna Russ. Berkley Publishers, 1978; now in paperback also. Joanna Russ's new science-fiction novel is not another Female Man, but it's a real winner just the same. Its protagonist, Irene Waskiewicz, is a trans-temporal agent, who, with her co-worker Ernst (a "good man"), is working on a Moslem planet in another possible world. She is outraged at how women are treated there and does manage to rescue Zubeydeh, a 12-year-old girl, though she has to leave other oppressed women behind. Zubeydeh, though she chose to leave, carries her Moslem perceptions with her. She is hostile to Irene, often preferring Ernst. Her perceptions of what goes on between Irene and Ernst enable Irene to see Ernst in a new way (e.g. she insists Irene and Ernst must be married, though (Irene believes) they are not), and to realize that "good men" are oppressors like the rest. 4 The book is essentially a (successful) attempt to deal with the fact that women (my mother, your mother) can be much more unpleasant than the men who are in charge and love their daughters--and to still put the blame where it belongs, on the men. It has a startling and satisfying denouement which I won't reveal. The heterosexual sex scenes may be offensive to some. Still, I highly recommend it. - Anne Peticolas HOW-TO KEEP MEN FROM SITTING NEXT TO YOU ON THE BUS! I prefer to sit alone on the bus; but, if the bus is crowded, I had far rather a woman than a man were next to me. I decided to see if there was some way I could control this. The first thing I tried was to look friendly when a woman went by and to avert my eyes when a man passed. This had the exact opposite effect from what I wanted. Almost always it was a man who sat by me! Then I figured that perhaps men preferred to sit by women because of the way I noticed men near me were sitting, knees spread widely apart, taking up lots of room. I tried sitting like that but it didn't seem to help. Finally, I realized that looking at people made them not want to sit by you. Now I look, in an attentive but neutral way, at the men who get on the bus. When a woman approaches, I look out the window, sometimes shifting my body slightly to make room for her. This works almost all the time! - Anne Peticolas SPRF..P.D ~OP-.D AfJl),1T AUS'l.~ND'!UU At the las" !Id~ "inight befo1:a , •i fog) 'i:,'.l"'ND'i"'{E ft Ml."ang~ 'l.~th cbl' or l T7.ME RAS CCMF, col act .. .re !el.I. :h .:,ugn. Whae: tu:.-;,eoad I W 11 zur a ., U-il"\ll\t • our next issue. This l!'i,ans hat: (1) We he-ve no a c. .as to anv .iilJ..ng iiHt We Bi' 1 mailing th1• iaaue only t, a n•or 11~~ of friend•, frien1s Qf friend•• ac~uaintun ~s, etc •• and dist:Tibul:i-"\1• thP nthar copies tl& beet W!! can. (2) We are def in· r:ely in the hol~ Expe.l"..aes for t.iis • ueue so i:ar .irt' $16 for 'P O, box J?lu 1 $1'3 for printior, (actual cos ) • Thia ie $ j5 so f.~ at d 1,e tti U also be spending a pt esentl1 1.mknawt! a'llOun .. o poetage, IneOUl?l for thia is100 o far 1.8 $5 we run,e rece ed .or as hecriptiou TI ia doeti n t l!lea:1 th t a0!3T NUfl. w1 H fold. -~~ J!rombe t publi&" ALSTL'\"DlK.I c :J.dtly till .. h . end of th year• and we vlan t continue put) tishing af!'. T tha W ." n,. :i tou;,scription9 o.nd n s for ur m 111ng lia~ A! so, p.l.f'MC l.~.1.:p <12 ut by .11 ~ f.lJS'T Nl>Y , J r Anne Peticolas, Ann Azolakov, tlarbara Hopson and Nancy Elaine worked on this issue. SUBSCRIPTION BLANK Please enter my subscription to AUSTINDYKE: 6 months (_$2. 50} __ 1 year ($5.00) I cannot send you money now, but please put me on the ma i1 i ng 1 is t Name------------------------------------ Address -------------------------------- City ______________ _ State ______ _ Zip _____ _ 4 The book is essentially a (successful) attempt to deal with the fact that women (my mother, your mother) can be much more unpleasant than the men who are in charge and love their daughters--and to still put the blame where it belongs, on the men. It has a startling and satisfying denouement which I won't reveal. The heterosexual sex scenes may be offensive to some. Still, I highly recommend it. - Anne Peticolas HOW-TO KEEP MEN FROM SITTING NEXT TO YOU ON THE BUS! I prefer to sit alone on the bus; but, if the bus is crowded, I had far rather a woman than a man were next to me. I decided to see if there was some way I could control this. The first thing I tried was to look friendly when a woman went by and to avert my eyes when a man passed. This had the exact opposite effect from what I wanted. Almost always it was a man who sat by me! Then I figured that perhaps men preferred to sit by women because of the way I noticed men near me were sitting, knees spread widely apart, taking up lots of room. I tried sitting like that but it didn't seem to help. Finally, I realized that looking at people made them not want to sit by you. Now I look, in an attentive but neutral way, at the men who get on the bus. When a woman approaches, I look out the window, sometimes shifting my body slightly to make room for her. This works almost all the time! - Anne Peticolas INCOME FOR THIS ISSUE: Subscription money from Our Time Has Come (estimate from Our Time Has Come collective) EXPENSES OF THIS ISSUE: P.O. box rental (six months) Deposit for P.O. box keys Printing Postage $14 2 15 (estimate) 22 (estimate) Total expenses of this issue $40 (approximately) $53 (approximately) Anne Peticolas, Ann Azolakov, Barbara Hopson and Nancy Elaine worked on this issue. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - SUBSCRIPTION BLANK Please enter my subscription to AUSTINDYKE: 6 months (.$2. 50} __ 1 year ($5.00) I cannot send you money now, but please put me on the mailing list Name------------------------------------ Address City ______________ _ State ______ _ Zip ------ . ' .. lJRITE YOUR LETTER, ARTICLE, OR COi I11[flT HERE AND 11AIL TO AUSTH!DYKE , P.O. nox 3374, AUSTrn, TEXAS 713764. rJAJlE -(A_S_Y_O_U_W_AN_T----,-IT TO APPEAR) !'IIONE (IN CASE- WE WANT TO EDIT) .. ' .
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