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The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983
File 009
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The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 009. 1983-11-25. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 3, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-25). The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 009. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/673

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 009, 1983-11-25, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 3, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date November 25, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 The Star/Nov. 25, 1983 Gays' Dress Influencing Nongay Men International Gay News Agency The gay movement "has had an extraordinary influence" on male fashion, according to designer Lee Wright, who recently agreed to do an exclusive collection of menswear for J.C. Penney. Wright says that there has been a gradual revolution in the way men dress themselves. Traditionally men would shop for themselves after the entire family was outfitted. Now, more and more males are thinking about their image and taking time to shop for themselves. Wright attributes this change to the gay movement. "It's a known fact that gay men have a more esthetic sensibility about them, and it carries over into the nongay community," Wright said. Wright is the third well-known designer to join the Penney team. Halston and Cathy Hard wick are already creating collections for the store that are geared toward the Middle .America customer—in other words, the budget-conscious consumer. Smaller Cities Felt Impact of Gay Vote By Ernie Potvin Via Gay Press Association Wire Service In November's municipal elections across the country, the impact ofthe gay vote was felt in several cities. Also noteworthy was the fact that many of the mayoralty winners were liberal women and blacks who sought and received the support of the gay community. Big city gay political clubs supported and helped reelect mayors Diane Fein- stein in San Francisco and Kathy Whit- mire in Houston. They were also deeply involved in the election of Philadelphia's first black mayor, Wilson Goode. Yet another interesting story was taking place in much smaller cities where young gay political groups were making an impact. In Sacramento, the gay community's six-month-old River City Democratic Club was the city's only political organization to support Anne Rudin for mayor in the primaries where she won a second place runoff spot. They supported her again, along with the local gay press, in the Nov. 8 general election where she narrowly won the city hall race by less than a thousand votes. Her opponent, Ross Relies, did take the city's first black mayor. The Lambda Cau- opportunity to do same gay-baiting during cus, which boasts less than 12 members, the last days of the campaign. He pub- staged three candidate nights before a lished a widely distributed flyer which did larger gay men's social/educational not receive prior approval from the elec- group called Acceptance. Each mayoralty tion board, and included a brief, edited candidate appeared separately to answer and misleading list of her backers. It was questions and state his position on gay limited almost exclusively to gay, feminist and environmentalist endorsements. The River City Democratic Club, for example, was listed as the River City Gay and Lesbian Democratic Club, and her only press endorsement on the list was shown as Mom, Guess What (a gay newspaper. In the Sacramento Bee, the city's major daily, Rudin said, "Ross Relies' list of endorsements is woefully incomplete and purposefully so. They were intended to get knee-jerk reactions from voters." Prior to the issuance ofthe controversial flyer, Relies was believed to be leading in the race. Whatever its effect, Anne Rudin would not have won the mayor's seat without the strong support she received from the gay community. In Charlotte, N.C., a city of 300,000, the small but influential Lambda Political Caucus helped elect Harvey Gantt, that Gay Events Get Noted in the Non-Gay Press By Jim Kepner Via Gay Press Association Wire Service In a scattering of local elections which saw pro-gay candidates elected in several cities (and homophobe Kathy MacDonald defeated in Georgia by a 3-2 majority), the New York Times ran an Oct. 8 feature: "Increasing Political Influence of Homosexual Citizens is Sensed Across U.S." A quarter of the half-page story dealt with Rich Eychaner, Republican cndidate for Iowa's fourth Congressional seat, including Des Moines. Eychaner, challenging a solid Democratic incumbent, calls himself "a qualified person who happens to be gay." He is a Methodist Sunday School teacher, owner ofthe state's largest moving van company, a baseball team officer, a TV talk show host—and popular in state GOP circles. The Times .article, by Dudley Clendinen, traced the close relationship between the gay community and Washington, D.C.'s Mayor Barry, Houston's Mayor Whitmire (reelected) and other* office holders in Sacramento, Boston, San Francisco, Philadelphia and Key West, where businessman Richard Heyman this month became the third openly gay mayor to be elected in the U.S., joining mayors of Buncetown, Mo., and Laguna Beach, Calif. The article (cramped by the Times' refusal to use the word gay except in quotations) discussed how often gay voters support black candidates and spoke ofthe growing "rainbow coalition." It noted former gay-baiters who now court gay votes and discussed victories and plans of the Human Rights Campaign Fund, the National Association of Gay and Lesbian Democrats and the National Gay Task Force. Granting that homosexual efforts to assert their political influence proceeds "by fits and starts," the article rounded off on college instructor David Scondras' race for the Boston City Council. Said Scondras, "The age of bigotry is eclipsing, and the age of coalition-building is beginning." The gay-baiting of Bill Allain, Mississippi's Democratic gubernatorial candidate, was labeled "dirty politics" in many newspapers and in Newsweek—and by the son of William Spell, one ofthe lawyers who charged Bill Allain's sexual activity with at least three black male prostitutes. Allain denied the "damnable" charges, taking a lie detector test—and won election handily, proving again that gay- baiting is no sure-fire tactic. But gay political clout was nosed out in Massachusetts by a 19-18 Senate vote sending the Gay Rights bill to the state Supreme Court for an opinon—unlikely to be delivered before the legislature adjourns. The only attention this got outside the state was 10 lines in USA Today (Nov. 3). TheQuincy, Mass., Patriot Ledger (Oct. 27) quoted Rep. Gerry Studds saying that being a closet gay is living hell: "I've been in public life 10 years, having to deal with everything from hysteria to irrationality to hatred and plain ugliness ... having to live most of your adult as a closet gay person necessitates developing a very tough skin, or you'd ... go stark, raving mad." Several papers picked up bits of this interview. San Francisco columnist Herb Caen on Oct. 29 reported on Don Jackson's St. Pria- pus Church, whose slogan is "Sex can destroy evil." Jackson, who believes oral sex is sacramental, launched the "December '69" drive for gays to occupy underpopulated Alpine County, Calif. A St. Prjapus Church is expected shortly in Los Angeles. On Nov. 8, Caen reported that the gay- oriented Atlas Savings and Loan now has a straight president—whose wife is named Gaynelle. United Press International on Nov. 5 reported a University of California/Davis study showing that 14 percent of the women surveyed had been sexually harassed, mostly by male faculty members. One-point-one percent of the men surveyed reported having been sexually harassed on campus. The study didn't say by whom. Time on Nov. 14 reported a more damning study released at Harvard. The Los Angeles Times reported on Nov. 8 that four prisoners in three days had died in local jail facilities, reportedly by suicide or heart attacks. Three were in on sex charges. Gay news is rare in the newspaper business sections, but the Securities and Exchange Commission's action suspending trading of shares of Gay International for 10 days, a San Francisco-based company that publishes the Gay Areas Directory and owns several gay hotels, was reported by the San Francisco Examiner and the Los Angeles Times on Nov. 1. The SEC questioned the firm's financial stability and the accuracy of publicly disseminated information. Gay International went public in April and took over the San Francisco based telephone directory. Their stock has since climbed from 35* to $3. Company officials claimed harassment. They own extensive Ut^ and Hawaii real estate and are seeking to acquire property in Idaho and California. Edward Guthmann turned in a fine retrospective on poet, avant-garde filmmaker, incredibly elfin performer and radical fairy James Broughton for theSan Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 6. A third- generation Californian, Broughton at 80 remains vigorous, witty and committed to shocking his audiences, as he had early tried to shock his conservative stepfather. Seven days earlier, Guthmann did a fine piece on gay Russian filmmaker Serge Eisenstein, whose documentary Que Viva Mexico, left unedited at some 50 hours, was slashed up by socialist "producer" Upton Sinclair, who objected to the filmmaker's erotic treatment of Mexican youth. :ivil rights. Democrat Harvey Gantt said he would work to add sexual orientation to Charlotte's nondiscrimination ordinance, while his Republican opponent, Ed Peacock, felt it was not needed. Also appearing were eight candidates for 11 city council seats. Don King, ofthe caucus, said it was the best turnout Lambda Political Caucus ever had in their three-year history. Electing a liberal black mayor in a state that has become increasingly conservative in the last 20 years is no easy feat, especially in a city like Charlotte, where whites outnumber blacks by three-to-one. The Lambda Caucus met early with Gantt at a breakfast strategy meeting, they did widespread leafletting for him during both the primary and general election, and finally they set up a telephone bank to make a thousand calls to potential gay supporters and their friends. Gantt, a Democrat, won by 4000 votes out of 80,000 cast. It can be safely assumed that many of them were gay people. He had been the first North Carolina candidate to take his campaign into a gay disco and discuss gay issues. In Charlotte, as in many similar cities in the nation, some candidates are afraid to go after gay endorsements, believing it could harm them, but that attitude has already begun to change. There appeared to be a lot of cross-over voting in Charlotte on Nov. 8, for not only did liberal Gantt win, but a good number of the city council seats were won by conservative Republicans. COT A HOME COMPUTER? tfiyou have 8 personal compt/ter or da\a teripinal, j then vou should check oul the latest form of electronic com- mqnicatlpns in the cay community. Tne GNIC NefwonrJs a n)ulti-user news, formation ai service with ovkr25u\ cities\in the U. S. <S Can ida! Our response times' are last, and hohrly ratesar^ low (only $5.2$rhr). functions ydpcanchoose Iron inck de:electroiiicmatl, bulletin beard, day news, legal advisor, a mijiti-usBr chit facility, arid much, m\uch rtiore. Vou can jom'asa fuH subscriber, and w& will n):ailyou yok owi) personal ID number $ password (along with the local phone access number in your area) '■ the same day be receivelypuramplication. Or, youcanjdin on a special trial subscription ai)d receive all the benefits of regular membership plui two flee ■ hours of access. Then ifydu wish, youcanjdin as a regular memberforonly mmok. • CA Y HEWS •INFORMA TION • mllJJtsm^Bi L 0 Regular Subscription $30 Q Trial Subscription $15 D Send me more information, please. Name Address- City „State. -Zip. Type of Computer- Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006
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