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The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983
File 005
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The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 005. 1983-11-25. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 3, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/669.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-25). The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 005. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/669

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 005, 1983-11-25, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 3, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/669.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date November 25, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 The Star/Nov. 25, 1983 AIDS Update: No Longer Gay White Man's Disease By Dion B. Sanders Via Gay Press Association Wire Service SAN FRANCISCO —Shattering a widely-held belief that AIDS is a "white gay man's disease," previously-unpublicized data compiled by the national Center for Disease Control in Atlanta show that more than a third of all AIDS patients in the United States are from racial and ethnic minorities. Moreover, a doctor's report published in a leading medical journal says that while a significant percentage of black and Hispanic AIDS patients—not counting Haitians—are intravenous drug users, an equally-significant percentage of them are upfront gays. In a telephone interview from Atlanta, Dr. Richard Selik, director of AIDS information at the CDC, reported that as of Oct. 19, out of a total of 2513 AIDS cases nationwide, only 57.9 percent are white. Blacks (including Haitians), Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans make up a combined 40.9 percent, Selik said, with the remaining 2.2 percent of undetermined ethnic origin. For months, news media reports have repeatedly stated that AIDS patients are primarily gay men, IV drug users, Haitians and hemophiliacs receiving blood transfusions. Gay men account for 71 percent of all AIDS cases nationwide. The belief that AIDS is a "white gay man's disease" stems from a long-held perception of the gay community by the general public—especially by minority communities—as being exclusively white, despite the emergence of gay and lesbian people of color into the public eye in recent months. (In San Francisco, this perception has led to charges by some minority community leaders that public funds being appropriated for AIDS are being taken away from existing health programs for the poor—a disproportionate percentage of whom are black and Hispanic, according to local press reports.) As of Oct. 19, there have been 1048 deaths, for a mortality rate of 41.7 percent nationally, Selik reported. Providing a breakdown of nationwide AIDS figures by ethnic group, Selik reported that blacks make up 21.1 percent. AIDS CASES IN THE U.S. BY RACIAL/ETHNIC ORIGIN AS OF OCTOBER 19. 1983 ethnic group number pclg ol cases ol cases White Black (Non-Haitian) Haitian Latinos Asians Native American Other Ethnic Origin TOTAL 1456 57.9% 648 21.1% 117 4.7% 354 14.1% 8 3 47 2.2% 2513 100.0% 'Less than 1 percent Source: Center for Disease Control. Atlanta, Ga. "with the figure rising to 25.8 percent when Haitians are included. "Hispanics make up 14.1 percent, with Asians and Native Americans combined comprising approximately 1 percent," Selik said. "The remaining 32 percent of AIDS patients are of undetermined ethnic origin," he reported. The proportion of blacks and Hispanics among people with AIDS is striking in that it is nearly double the proportion of blacks and Hispanics in the U.S. population as a whole. Even more striking is the fact that as of Oct. 19, there have been only eight cases of AIDS reported nationally among Asians and only three among Native Americans. No nationwide city-by-city ethnic breakdown was available from the CDC, but according to figures compiled by the San Francisco Department of Public Health, out of a total of 288 cases in the Greater Bay Area as of Oct. 18, 90.3 percent are white, 4.9 percent are black, 3.8 percent are Hispanic, and a fraction of 1 percent are Asian or Native American. In sharp contrast, 50 percent of AIDS cases reported in Philadelphia as early as last July are black, according to that city's health department, prompting the creation of an AIDS education program aimed specifically at black gays in that city. Philadelphia, Atlanta and Washington, D.C. all have sizeable black populations, with blacks an overwhelming majority in the nation's capital. Asked what percentage of the non-white AIDS cases are gay and what percentage are IV drug users, Selik quoted figures from an article by Dr. Harold Jaffe published in the Aug. '83 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases (Vol. 148, p. 339). The article, based on CDC reports of 2000 AIDS cases nationally as of last July, reported that among non-Haitian blacks who had AIDS, 17 percent were upfront gays, 46 percent were IV drug users, and 37 percent were of undetermined risk factors. (A similar breakdown of Haitian AIDS patients by the Jaffe article has been rendered unreliable because of recent news reports disclosing that many such Haitians were gay, but were unwilling to admit it, because of severe taboos against homosexuality in Haitian society, Selik said.) Among Hispanic AIDS patients, the Jaffe article reported that 11 percent were upfront gays, 33 percent were IV drug users, and 55 percent were of unknown risk factors. The Jaffe article contained no report on Native Americans and Asians with AIDS, because there were no reported cases among them at the time the article was published, Selik said. Nor did the article contain information on the number of AIDS patients who were women. In the San Francisco area, only three cases of AIDS among IV drug users have been reported so far, according to Pat Norman, coordinator of lesbian/gay health services for the city. Two are white; the third is black. Norman noted that whereas 71 percent of AIDS cases nationally are gay, the figure rises to 90 percent in the San Francisco area, as there are "only a handful of Haitians," living here. Locally, there have been 96 deaths, for a mortality rate of approximately 35 percent. Norman attributed the disparity of the national and local mortality rates to the near-absence of IV and Haitian AIDS cases here. Selik reported that the percentage ethnic breakdown "has been fairly constant for more than a year." Asked why the ethnic data had not previously been published by either the gay or the mainstream media up to now, Selik responded, "Perhaps they (editors) for some reason thought that it wasn't newsworthy." Get ne latest Gay Community News Every Othet friday in Tbe Stat Bi/ery Othet Friday, The Stat' gives you the latest local and national gay community news—the events that made the news during the past two weeks. Look for us at clubs and shops in Austin, San Antonio and Corpus Christi
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