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The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983
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The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 001. 1983-11-25. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/665.

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(1983-11-25). The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/665

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The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983 - File 001, 1983-11-25, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/678/show/665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 2, November 25, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date November 25, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Some Gays Outfront in Anti-Nuke Movement Br. Ernie Potvin V a Gay Pree• AaM>Ciation Wire Service LOS ANGELES-Seven thousand people marched in the Parade for Peace in El Segundo, a suburb of Los Angeles, last month, on the International Day of Disar­mament. It was one of many demonstra­tions across the country, and in Southern California, like the others, a good number of gay people were actively involved. The Gay Press Association was at the rally following the march and returned to El Segundo the following Monday morn­ing when 160 people engaged in acts of civil d1Bobedience to block the entrances of six industries engaged in the nuclear arms race. There were gay men and women involved in that activity as well. We spoke with some of them and with an elderly woman in a wheelchair who prominently wore her Parents and Friends of Gays but­ton, which she swore she never takes off. The march and rally was sponsored by four major groups, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which is a multi­ethnic and ecumenical organization; the Southern California Nuclear Weapons Freeze Campaign; the Interfaith Cent.er to Reverse the Arms Race; and the Alliance for Survival, a grassroots educational organization working to stop the arms race. Don Tait is a staff member with the Alliance for Survival. He told us he is one of several openly gay people staffing their Los Angeles office. At the rally, he was acting as an official media spokesperson and fielding the questions from more than a dozen newspa!)('rS and television and radio stations. The organizers were obviously pleased continued page 5 THE STAR AUSTIN* SAN ANTONIO Nov. 25, 1983 • Issue .2 • Published Every Other Friday The Sons of Gypsy Rose Lee By Ed Martine7 Erotic fanta&1es lurk tn the air along with the smoke 1'his is a gay bar, and the pro­gram for the everung is strippers, strip­tease dancers, male ones, guys with gorgeous bodies and exy looks taking it off, taking it ALL off-well, almost all, anyway. From a fod in non-gay bar that has attracted national publici t y-malt· dnnct'r& who take off their clothes for the titillation of ladies-the practice has finally migrated to gay bars. Unlike many societal trends that begin in the gay sub­culture and then get translated into non­gay society, this number went the other way. Tonight, the Crossing, one of Austin's more popular bars, will host an evening of male dancers under the guidance of, and emcee'd by the manager, David Dauber By tripling the business at the Crossing in the last eeven months, David proved his ideas-ideas gained from his experience as manager of bars in San Francisco, such as the R,,ndezvous. There, David was the first to introduce the use of DJ's in gay bars, and he lived and worked there for 10 years off and on. The Crossing stages these evenings of terpsichore and burlesque on the average of once a month, and tonight's the night. The dancers are recruited by means of ads in such periodicals as the STAR, TWT and The Daily Texan, UT's student paper. As curtain time approaches, the bar beg­ins to move from comfortably full, to crowded, then to packed, with anticipa­tion and eager customers anxious for the show to begin. The dancers tric.kle into the office where David waits to give them their last-minute instructions and !)('p talk. Some have never done this before in their lives. Some have done it only in non-gay clubs. Some have not only done it in gay clubs, but are repeaters in the Crossing's shows. These are truly the heirs of the tradition started by female strippers, the Gypsy Rose Lees the Sally Rands, women who dared to bare their all for the customers, for fame for money, and, not least, for the sheer thrill of having people lust aft.er their bodies, the incredibl_e burst of egot­ism that comes from knowing that the peo­ple out there would love to pos~ss. the!r bodies. Male or female, the movttatio!1 ~s the same and the emotions are, too. This 1s going to be a night to remember, both onstage and off. Texas law prohibits male dancers from displaying their genitals, but buns are okay, and, occas1onally, garment, have been known to fail unexpectedly, for wha­tever reason, showing something that, while illegal, could hardly be considered deliberate-or at least could not be proved deliberate_ As the dancers stroll in v.ith overnight ba ont i1un thei~ co tum , the c.hnt among tht"m&eJves Tiger Joe is 20, originally from Austin but raised in Michigan, where he became a gymnast, a skill he uses in his dancing. He's danced and stripped in San Antonio and Austin and is entered in the Mr. Gay Texas preliminaries in Austin. Ken is from San Antonio and worked as a dancer m Killeen, Tex., before moving to Austin Also 20. Ken starts his act in pur­ple spandex and works his way down to a T-bag or G-stnng. Both Tiger Joe and Ken look like the "boy next door," boyieh, attractively friendly, honest and unashamed of what they are doing. 0.J. is a profess1onal dancer, he's 24, and he seems 11upremely confident. Obviously talented and trained in his art, he enjoys what he's doing and is looking forward to the show. By now the tiny room into which the young men, none older than 25, have crowded is packed. David asks for quiet and l(~l" it Tnnight the dancers, eight of them, winnowed from a field of perhaps 30 upplicants, will compete for the first prize money of $100. There's no consolation prize. The dancers dance strictly for tips. which are unsually placed provocatively in the dancers' skimpy shorts and G­strings, leading inevitably to semi-sexual encounters between them and the custo­mers. Still, this can be serious business-­money business. The prize money goes to the dancer selected by audience reaction. applause, applause. David explains the physical setup that will be used during the show. The dancers will work first on a main stage with their own music, then will move to a small stage in another room where they will dance to the succeeding dancer's music, thus giv­ing the customers throughout the bar their money's worth. "Be provacative, you guys, tum the crowd on. You can get as provocative as you want. If something shows, I wouldn't mind a bit. I have the microphone, I'm the bitch with the switch, so get out there and stripping for the thrill of ,t do it," David advises with a grin. The young men take it with good humor. Finally, the meeting is over, and the guys start to change into their costumes. Satin, spandex, sport clothes, cowboy boots-the range is wide_ As David turns to leave, he asks one of the new dancer,, '"What do you do for pleasure?" "Make it!"' the hunky dude answers, then laughs with the other guys in the room. They are JURt about ready to get their act together and put it on the stage_ David takes the microphone and warms up the crowd with teasers about the guys that will soon strut their stuff. The crowd loves it, and the sounds of anticipation are all over the room. The lights focus on the first dancer, the music comes up, and sud­denly, there, live in the flesh, is one carnal pleasure aft.er another, dancing, snaking around the dance floor, weaving sensu­ously nearer and closer to the audience, teasing and pleasing the guys m the room, Good Taste and Why Not? Allen Young, p.9 Gays in Smaller Cities Now Having Election Impact Newa,p.8 21.06 Plantiff Among Those to Get Gay 'Academic UnionAward Newa,p.8 £0 MA~T ~ STAR PHOTOS giving them what they came for This 1s it, this is not pornography, this isn't a porn movte, this is real, these guys .are right there, you can, and do, touch th~m.) ou put dollars bills in their dra" ere, it's the real • McCoy_ One dancer follows another, interspersed with patter and suggestive banter from David. Finally, the moment of truth, the winner 1s selected, and ~he crowd loves it, the customers go wild, caught up in an erotic frenzy that is what burlesque is all about. No one really and truly expects to fulfill those fantasies. They know they won't go home with any of the dancers. But just for a few minutes, or hours, they might, just maybe, perhaps, it could happen. And even though that is outside the realm of reality, all those men­tal images, those flesh dreams, come true, will remain, always, m living color and live delight, to keep them warm for many cold nights. . - .. ~ . ... '. - --. ;:. ~ - . - - 2 THE STAR/ Nov. 25, 1983 Commentary Bless, Oh Lord, These Gifts By Peter Harrison So Car as I can tell, we Americans were the first people in the world to set aside a national holiday for giving thanks for the benefits we have received. Perhaps that', because we're so amply supplied with things that no one else has. I was thinking about that the other day, when I realized that even the Russians have refrigerators and indoor plumbing, two things that would confound the BUpremacist ideas of Richard Nixon and Earl Butz. It only takes a little thought, though, to come up with a myriad of gifts that we American, should give thanks for in this year of grace. Here's a list of the people and groups I want to remember this Thanksgiving Day. Somehow, sitting down with a turkey on the table makes recalling them all the more appropriate. I will fold my handa, bow my head and pray: "Dear Lord, thanks for the many gifts you have bestowed upon us. You have given us the miraculous gift of Hollywood, that never-never land where even a lowly 8-grade movie star can rise above all else to become President of the United States, thereby giving us a view of the future. In years to come. we can expect Tab Hunter in that exalted position of guiding our des­tiny, to be followed by such luminaries as the Fonz or perhaps Donny Osmond. "You have graced our PrMident with a sense of humor. Not only can he see the humor of the position of women and their value in taking us away from our caveman values, but his wit is also subtle. "He named a secretary of the interior whose zany charm included stripping the country of its interior, and a director of environmental protection who refused to protect the environment. "He has given ua a surgeon general who disregards the health of IO percent of our population, and a aecretary of qriculture who lets starving people aee pictures of mountains of surplus cheMe, in the belief that their hunger pangs will be thus auuqed without having to eat the real thing. "He bu mercifully named John Gavin to be ambueador to Mexico, thereby eav• ing us the embarruament of having to watch that bad actor on television show•• THE STAR Ctrcutallld In Austin. Sen Anton.o end Cor'pu1 Chr•ti Published every other Friday 3008-A Burleson Road Austin, TX 78741 Phone Austin (512) 448-1380 Mon.,_VobPubl.,.ngCO CIRCULATION Tho Star. 4,000 _._ t.w""ly MonlloM V_. CHoul10n) 11,000 _.. -ly Del• 0..,, - 1.000--ly lO&II Tuu .,.., 11.000 C0PfiN ....._., •"G ~- 3.117 MonirON 8Mf r.J0e Howton. TX 77008 (713) S29-G822 Contents copyright •198;> Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg ,,.,,,,._, ,Ed Martnez - eddOr l Y!_ Harns ••KCJtive MN•f!'•'!!!J.... dir•ctor Rico Yo,mg Srar -!"!2. dnctor Acel Clarto •n d,tecro, Jeff Bray g,opna Sonny Dav,.s accounting ,.,_ GayP,,-Auocmc,n --·-,__,a.,,,_.,._ Pociflc- $yndlCMed , .. ,u,.. $MY,cM ti Wr#.,. Jeftr9Y Wu.on. Randy Attrect Sfoneiw-1N FNtur• Syndbte. Bnan ~cNaugnt. Joe Bakw l'OSTMMT£~ Send - ..,,,_ ID 3317 Mont!OM •301. --TX 7700e SubM:r,pllon tale ,In US in aNJ«/ ~ $-41 "'yMI (5,2 ...... $21pe,1u1montt'l1(21uueit),Of$125Pl't'WNk(_. lhan 29 luuN BaClo - $2 00 _._ Nat~ _,.,.,,.11'19 ,.pr__,,_,,.,,. Joe 0.sabalO, Rhren6liU --eM eu, .._ - Yon 10011, 1212) 242-88&3 A_,,."'11 __ ....-,-r-530pm fot lAuo -.-,ng Friday ..... ng NofiU kJ ~ Loa1 ~ ratelCheduteOnewn --11 1983 AespoM,bl;ty '7he ~ dON not uaume rNponsitM11ty t0t ~ dalma Reederl 1tiould ~ -The SU,.. to any - ~ Allow, oh Lord, our President to see the merit of sending Bob Hope on an official mission to Zambia before that wizened comic can again bring tits and ass to a Christmas special. "And Lord, thank you for NBC, which has brought Freddie Silverman to net• work TV in an effort to show us again what the lowest common denominator of entertainment is. And thank you for allowing that same network to give us Mr. Smith. We had existed so long without an ape that talks. "And thank you, Lord. for the people of the U.S., a million of whom called that ape on a toll-charge number to hear him res,d a promo for his show. We worried about the health of Ma Bell, and those calls made her a half-million dollars richer. "Lord we are most pleased with our First La°dy, who, as the secretary of agri­culture works to get rid of food stamps. joins in to take away the people's sinful dope and drugs. Help her, we pray, to get rid of the high-fashion monkey on her back. "We are humble in the examples you have given us of those stricken with great infirmities who prevail. Thank you for Howard Cosell, who has learned to speak-incessantly-with his foot in hie mouth, and for Elizabeth Taylor, who con­tinues to look for a husband, even though she puts on 50 pounds after each marriage. "Thank you for the gay sense of style that allows us fags to worry more about what color hankie to wear in our pockets than if the bar we're going to visit is going to be raided and makM our leaders happ• ier with a Gay Pride celebration attended by eight people in three-piece suits than 10,000 in drq. "Thank you for the invaluable example of all the Semites-Arabs and Jews­wh08e fratricidal fighting makes our fam­ily quarrela - 1-threatenins. "Thank you for the invention of the term 'advisor•,' which allows us to get into more trouble more places faster than ever. "Thank you for the Ruuiane, whose ungodly behavior serves as a great em~ kescreen hiding our own injustices. ''Thank you for the institution of Your Own Son's crucifixion, which gives a model for bom-qain Christiane to use on those who don't agree with them. "And finally, Lord, thank you for Jerry Falwell. With Anita Bryant buay selling Your •unglaues, his loud voice is the only one that 9ee111e strong enough to unify the gay movement. "For all thMe many gifts, Lord, we thank You. And Lord, by the way, you needn't be quite eo generous in 1984." Harri.on live• in New Jersey. His column appear, here and in other gay publica• tums. rJJ983 Stonewall Feature• Synd,­cate. 'Gentlemen's Quarterly' Declines Gay Ad Gentlemen•• Quarterly, the national Cashion magazine probably found in more gay homes than non-gay, has declined an advertisement for Gay Housing LA '84, the only firm to win approval by the Cali­fornia Real Estate Department, reports the firm·• nl'WS release. The firm, which recently embarked on a worldwide ad campaign, was flatly refused when they approach G.Q. "It was made perfectly clear by G.Q. that the word 'gay' never appears on the pages of their mqazine. They claimed that they had no idea (or interest in know• ingJ if any of their readers were gay," said Philip Twichel, president of Amber-Gold Media in Los Angeles. "We wonder what would happen if everyone who subecribed let them know." A Full-Service Travel Agency for the Gay Community Houston Phone 529-8484 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference cttl GAY PRESS ASSOCIATION January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment If you are working in the gay media or are a ~ay person working in the non-~ay media ( either journalism. adver­tising or administrative), plan to join your colleagues in Houston. Also, for officials of gay organizations who are NOT in the gay media but who would like to learn ho.v to better Influence the gay media, local and national, we'll have a special workshop. To Henry McClurg, vice president Gay Press Association 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 Enclosed Is my $25 registration fee for the Southern Regional Conference. c I am in the gay media. D I work for the non-gay media. o I do not work in the media but would like to attend the workshop on influencing the gay media and other events of the conference. Name ______________ _ Address Phone(s) o I am a member of the Gay Press Association Cl I am NOT a member of the Gay Press Association (If cm,,,ing In Houston b'(pla\e. Iron or bus. iet us knowyoortimeofom11olondwewlll pick you up at the 01rport or depot.) When we receive your form. we'll send you a conference sc~le and a brochure on the Sa.lCl-f Hotel so you con make rese,vations (You do not have to stay, at The SavCJy to attend the confer~e ) The Sa.lCl-f is within walking distance of several gay, clubs. Addlt10n­ally, busses will be a,.,ailable for tours of Montrose nightspots Your registration fee will include tickets fOf free and dtScounted admis­sions to several clubs 21.06 Plaintiff Among Those Receiving Gay Academic Union Awards Nov 25, 1983 / THE STAR 3 The Gay Academic Union, Inc. will pres­ent special awards to 11 individuals and two organizations at an awards dinner in San Diego, Saturday, Nov. 26. The dinner, a fund raising effort for the National GAU Scholarship program, is part of GAU-9, the Ninth National Conference of the Gay Academic Union on the campus of the University of California at San Diego. This is the fifth presentation of annual awards by GAU, an organization of les­bian and gay academics and profeRsion­a ls with chapters and members nationwide. The awards are designed to recognize and honor the achievements of individuals in various fields who have made significant contributions to gay scholarships and understanding and the enhancement of the gay experience. Previous recipients have included such individuals as Abigail Van Buren of "Dear Abby" fame, former presidential advisor Midge Costanza, writer Chris, topher Isherwood and former California Gov. Edmund G. Brown, Jr. The Humanitanan Award for demon strating exceptional understanding, com­passion, courage and commitment to human rights in work that had direct benefit to the gay community this year will be presented to Paul Popham and the Gay Men's Health Crisis, Inc. in New York City for efforts at raising funds to meet the major health crisis of this decade The Evelyn C. Hooker Research Award for gay-related research that demon• strates in its design and implementation tht- standards of exct>llence that have characterized Dr. Hooker's own work will be presented to Rhonda R. Rivera, Esq., Associate Dean for Clinical Programs in Ohio State University College of I.aw for her monumental analysis in HastinRB I.aw ,Journal of nearly every gay-related court case. Her 200-page article was cited in the dt'Cls10ns wl11ch invahdat,'<I the IIOd omy laws of New York and Texas and pro­vides the basic legal position for civil litigation on behalf of gay and lesbian clients. The Throry Development Award is for work-in-progress on the development of social theory promising to contribute sig­nificantly to an underslllnding of gay­relatrd issue.s. This year's rt>cipient is thi, team of Dr. David P. McWhirter, MD, and Andrew M. Mattison, PhD, oftheClinical Institute for Human Relationships in San Diego, for their exhaustive study of gay male couples to ht• published this fall. Tht> Performing Arts Award 1s for out­standing achievement in a theatrical medium that snves to inform and enlighh•n the public's view oflesbians and gny men. This year 1t salute.s the unique contribution madt• by Harvey Fienstein to the growing field of gav theater and its crossover mto wider acceptance by a non gay audience ns t•xempllfied by his Tony Award-winning play Torch 8on,: Tri/o,:} and his book for the current Broadway musicul hit I.a Cane aux Fol/es. Ironically, last vear's award was to ,John Glines, pro• duccr of Torch Song Trilogy which had Just made the transition to Bro11dway from Grt,enw1ch Vill111:c. This year's GA{' Uterature Award for published work with n guy related theme that articulates with unusual l>l'auty issues of importance to lesbians and gay m,•n 1s hemg presented to Alice Rloch, author of J,,f, timeUuarantce(Perlll'phone Press, 1981 ). Her new novel, The I.aw of Return being published this fall by Aly­son Publications, 1s descrihod as "the rich sensual story of a woman claiming her voice as a ,Jew, a leRbian and a woman" which is winning pra1s~.for "its vibrancy and sense of revelation. Th,• 198:J GAU Fine Arte Award for achievement that illuminates in an excep tional way the quality of the gay expe­rience got>s to David Hockney, a distinquished artist whose career has embraced not only pointing but theater and opera dt>sign . The Journalism Award is d<'81gned to recognize the uniqu«i contributions which Don Baker reportage about gay men and women and their lifestyles makes toward greater knowledge and understanding of the gay conditon. This year itis being presented to The Body Politic Collective in Toronto which has made a valiant effort to pub• lish, despite the concerted efforts of Cana­dian authorities to shut down the paf"'r, The President's Award for unusual dili­gence in overcoming anti-gay prejudices and increasing understanding and accep­tance of gay people in the community at large will be presented to two individuals this year. Virginia Appuzzo. as Executive Director of the National Gay Task Force, has become one of the most effective spo• kespersons for gay men and lesbians, their concerns and their lifestylea, before Congressional committees, with White House aides and in the media. Emery Hetrick, MD, who helped develop the Cau• cue of Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Members of the American Psychiatric Association and iR" a founder of Goy Psy• chiatrists of New York and New York Phy­sicians for Human Rights. has also been a frequent spokesper,;on on televiS1on and in print for the gay community. In addition to these honors, two Special Recognition Award for actions signifi. cantly contnbuting to the ad, ancementof the lesbian and gay rights movement will be given .to Jeanne Cordova of Loa Angeles and Don Baker of DallaR. During the decade she published The Lesbian Tide, Cordova provided a sorely­needed voice for the lesbian community. She was a political force successfully pushing for a lesbian platform at the International Women's Year Conference in Houston. More recently she has written for a variety of publications, including Gay Commumity News, The AduOC'ate, Update, Frontiers and Off Our Backs. Baker i the former Dallas school te.acher who was plaintiff in the successful suit to strike down the Texas sodomy law. He headed the Dallas Gay Alliance for thre(' terms. The awards to Cordova and Baker recognize their long-standing com­mitment to gay and leabian rights and their willingnesb t.o put themselves on the line to achieve those right,;. The awards dinner will be held at the La Jolla Village Inn in San Diego beginning at 7:30 p.m , Saturday, November 26. Jesse Jackson Sees Gays as Rich, Influential B;r Ernie Potvin Via GPA Wire Service Last September, a black-tie crowd of 1000 gays heard Reverend Jesse Jackson, the prime spoke,;man of today's black move• ment, ask for gay people t.o join blacks and other minorities in a political alliance. The event was the .. econd annual dinner of the Human Rights Campaign Fund at the Grand Ballroom of New York's Waldorf• Astoria Hotel. Jackaon was fiery and evangehcal in his delivery and sounded as ifhe had done some homework on gay issues, but proba­bly not enough. Although well received, the possible presidential candidate was still perceived to he lacking in undt>rstand­ing of gay lifestyles and agenda. Harvey Fierstein, writ<•r of the hit musi cal La Cage aux Folle, and the evening's M.C .. politely correctro Jackson on a cou pie of his comments following his keynote address. Jackson had Raid "Sexuality is a private thing and was not other people's business." Drawing a burst of applause, Fi<•rstein later said, "I would like to let you know that my sexuality 1s NOT a private thing, and I would like to be able to walk down the street and kiss my loverin public as freely as you can with your wife." In a litany of observations, Jachon had Raid, "Sex is a thrill, but so is gettmg the voting rights law passed in the 60s. Sex is a thrill, but so is unscrewmg all the nuclear heads off all those misRles. Sn is a thrill, but so is passing the ERA." To that Fierstrin commented, •·YN, sex is a thnlJ, but being gay is a lot more than being just a sexual person," and the ballroom went wild for a second time. Jackson noted that the gay community represented something totally unique in minority communities in that among the gay population is a white, middle dass, privileged economic group of people with a very high number of registered voters and a large voting turnout, which he said was quite the opposite of the black and women's communities. He ,;ewed gay peo­ple as being a rich and influential minor ity, one which could be v~ useful withm the Rainbow Coalition oflabor and minor• ity groups he had been actively pursuing. "You have power if JOU u,e It," he told the audience. To illustrate h1• pomt of build­ing coalitions, Jackson read off a list of black legislators supporting gay right,; bills in Congress Prior to his appearance nt the HRCF dinner, the Neu fork Natwe editon.slly wondered if he might talk with the two black at) councilmemhers who have con­sistently voted against a New York oty gay right,; ordinance and elicit their future backing. The question of the illusive ordi­nance was not addressed. Conspicuously absent from the dinner was :-;ew York Mayor Ed Koch who was nowhere to be seen. He did send a telegram though, which was read aloud and soundly booed by the entire tuxedoed crowd. Entertainment was provided by La Cage aux Foiles star George Hearn who sang " I Am What I Am." and by Pattie LaBelle who performed six number~ which tore the gathering apart. It was a Ball ... a Military B1111. that is, at Back Street Buice earlier thi,i month. Star Photos by Ed Martinez. 4 THE STAR/ Nov 25, 1983 AIDS Update: No Longer Gay White Man's Disease By Dion B. Sanders Via Gay ~eH Aaooriation Wire Service SAN FRANCISCO-Shattering a widely-held belief that AIDS is a "white gay man's diseaae," previously-unpublicized data compiled by the national Center for Disease Control m Atlanta show that more than a third of all AIDS patients in the United States are from racial and ethnic minorities. Moreover, a doctor's report pubhshed m a leading medical journal says that while a significant percentage of black and Hispanic AIDS patients-not counting Haitians-are intravenous drug users, an equally-significant percentage of them are upfront gays. In a telephone interview from Atlanta. Dr. Richard Selik, director of AIDS information at the CDC, reported that as ofOct. 19,out ofa total of2513 AIDS cases nationwide, only 57.9 percent are white. Blacks (including Haitians), Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans make up a combined 40.9 percent, Selik said, with the remaining 2.2 percent of undetermined ethnic origin. For months, news media reports have repeatedly stated that AIDS patients are primarily gay men, IV drug users, Haitians and hemophiliacs receiving blood transfusions. Gay men account for 71 percent of all AIDS cases nationwide. The belief that AIDS is a "white gay man's disease" stems from a long-held perception of the gay community by the general public-especially by minority communities-as being exclusively white, despite the emergence of gay and lesbian people of color into the public eye in recent months. (In San Francisco, this perception has led to charges by some minority commwrity leaders that public funds being appropriated for AIDS are being taken away from exiRting health programs for the poor-a disproportionate percentage of whom are black and Hispanic, according to local press reports.) As of Oct. 19, there have been 1048 deaths, for a mortality rate of 41.7 percent nationally, Selik reported. Providing a breakdown of nationwide AIDS figures by ethnic group, Selik reported that blacks make up 21.1 percent, AIDS CASES IN THE U.S. BY RACIAL/ETHNIC ORIGIN AS OF OCTOBER 19. 1983 •thn,c number pctg group of case.s of case, White 1456 57.9% Black (Non-Haitian) 648 211% Haitian 117 4 7% Latinos 354 14 1% Asians 8 Native American 3 Other Ethnic Orrgrn 47 2~ TOTAL 2513 100.0% 'Less than 1 percent Source Center lor Disease Control. Atlanta, Ga "with the figure rising to 25.8 percent when Haitians are included. "Hispanics make up 14.1 percent, with Asians and Native Americans combined comprising approximately 1 percent," Selik said. "The remaining 3.2 percent of AIDS patients are of undetermined ethnic origin," he reported. The proportion of blacks and Hispanics among people with AIDS is striking in that it is nearly double the proportion of blacks and Hispanics in the US. population as a whole. Even more striking is the fact that as of OcL 19, there have been only eight cases of AIDS reported nationally among Asians and only three among Native Americans. No nationwide city-by-city ethnic breakdown was available from the CDC, but according to figures compiled by the San Francisco Department of Public Health, out of a total of 288 cases in the Greater Bay Area as of Oct. 18, 90.3 percent arewhite,4.9 percent are black,3.8 percent are Hispanic, and a fraction of 1 percent are Asian or Native American. In sharp contrast, 50 percent of AIDS cases reported in Philadelphia as early as last July are black. according to that city's health department, prompting the creation of an AIDS education program aimed specifically at black gays in that city. Philadelphia, Atlanta and Washington, D.C. all have sizeable black populations, with blacks an overwhelming majority in the nation's capital. Asked what percentage of the non-white AIDS cases are gay and what percentage are IV drug users, Selik quoted figures from an article by Dr. Harold Jaffe published in the Aug, '83 issue of the Journal of lnfe~tious Diseases (Vol. 148, p. 339). The article, based on CDC reports of 2000 AIDS cases nationally as oflast July, reported that among non-Haitian blacks who had AIOS, 17 percent were upfront gays, 46 percent were IV drug users. and 37 percent were of undetermined risk factors. (A similar breakdown of Haitian AIDS patients by the Jaffe article has been rendered unreliable because of recent news reports disclosing that many such Haitians were gay, but were unwilling to admit it, because of severe taboos against homosexuality in Haitian society, Selik said.) Among Hispanic AIDS patients, the Jaffe article reported that 11 percent were upfront gays, 33 percent were IV drug users, and 55 percent were of unknown risk factors. The Jaffe article contained no report on Native Americans and Asians with AIDS, because there were no reported cases among them at the time the article was published, Selik said. Nor did the article contain information on the number of AIDS patients who were women. In the San Francisco area, only thr~ cases of AIDS among IV drug users have been reported so far, according to Pat Norman, coordinator of lesbian/ gay health services for the city. Two are white; the third is black. Norman noted that whereas 71 percent of AIDS cases nationally are gay, the figure rises to 90 percent in the San Francisco area, as there are " only a handful of Haitians," living here. Locally, there have been 96 deaths. for a mortality rate of approximately 35 percent. Norman attributed the disparity of the national and local mortality rates to the near-absence of IV and Haitian AIOS cases here. Selik reported that the percentage ethnic breakdown "has been fairly constant for more than a year." A"ked why the ethnic data had not previously been published by either the gay or the mainstream media up to now, Selik responded, "Perhaps they (editors) for some reason thought that it wasn't newsworthy" Set The Late1t Bag Communitg New, Ere,g Otbe, F,idag in The Star Ere,g Ot6e, F,idag, T6e $ta, Sire, gou t6e late1t local and national aa, oommun,tg new1-t6e erent, t6at made t6e new, du,ing t6e pa,t two week,. Looi< lo, u, at olu61 and 16op1 ,n Au1tin, $an Antonio and Co,pu, C6,i1ti Nov. 25, 1983 / THE STAR 5 Some Gays Out Front in Anti-Nuke Movement from page 1 with the turnout. They later learned it was the country's largest that day. The message from the crowd, and from the speakers on the platform, was loud and clear. They demanded a halt to the deployment of the Cruise and Pershing II missiles in Europe, a freeze on the produc­tion of nuclear weapons and the disman­tling of existing stockpiles in a verifiable plan with the Soviet Union. On the platform, acting as M.C. for the program of speakers and entertainers, was Midge Costanza, a former White House advisor to President Carter and a staunch supporting activist for the gay righta movement. Today, with her own brand of biting political humor, she kept the program moving. Among the half dozen speakers was Irene Eckert, a West German from the Women'• International League for Peace and Freedom, who spoke on the dangers of the Euromissiles and what the European peace movement is doing to prevent their installation. And that particular weekend, the movement was very visible indeed. Several million people took to the streeta in European cities to protest the introduc­tion of the missiles to their continent. There were reporta of 200,000 in London, Paris and Madrid, 175,000 in Rome and Brussels, and an incredible 300,000 in Bonn, West Germany's capitol, where it was said one could hear a pin drop when they called for silence in memory of the atomic bomb victims of Hiroehima. Following the rally in El Segundo, we talked with two gay women who -played key roles in the success of the event. Ellie Cohen is co-director of the Southern Cali­fornia Alliance for Survival. "I've been with the Alliance for four years," she said, "but this is my last rally with them. I've been hired by the national freeze campaign aa a field organizer, and l'11 be starting there in two weeks. This is kind of a going away party for me. To promote today's parade and raJly, I did 27 interviews in total, an issues media out­reach, including a bunch of radio stations. We also distributed 160,000 flyers, 60,000 of them door-to-door. It was mostly graBS roota. "There are a lot of gay people working in the peace movement who are not necessar­ily working the gay community," she added. "Some are in the closet, and some are reaJly out there. They're all against first strike weapons, though. Now I don't go somewhere and start out with, 'Hi, I'm Ellie, I'm against the nuclear buildup, and I'm a lesbian, but I don't hide it either." While Ellie talked, the speaker's plat­form was being dismantled a few feet away. and a red-headed woman kept run• ning by taking care of what must have been urgent business. When that woman, Mary Sullivan, stopped to talk, we disco· vered a lovely gay lady and a dynamic grass roota organizer. Mary shares a house with a number of other peace movement volunteers who organize mtttings in other people's homes where friends are invited to discuss the i118ues surrounding nuclear disarmament. She quickly explaim'<i how house mttt­ings work and how groups in other cities are picking up on it, then poeed for a pic­ture with Ellie and split to get back to her duties. It would appear that more gay women than gay men have become involved with the movement. At least that was the obser­vation of Mark Hallahan, a gay man who has been involved in training people on what to expect when participating in civil disobedience. Throughout the crowd at the rally, one_ coul~ pick out many people wearing pmk tnangle lapel buttons and lambdas. "I think gay men, in a lot of ways, are stiJI stuck to the whole bar syndrome, and that's very much the ~nter of their lives," said Mark. "I'm afraid we haven't gotten much beyond that. It'• going to take a real effort to get gay men involved in the peace movement." Following the rally, people started walk, ing back to their cars over the half mile parade route along busy El Segundo Boulevard. As they walked, they were con­fronted with dozens of anti-peace move­ment and anti-gay slogans freshly painted with stencils on the sidewalks. They were obviously done during the rally when hundreds of police and sheriff depu­ties were swarming the area. How they were painted, undected by the police, is a mystery. The meBSages read: Peacenik fags desire Yuri's warhead, and Peacenik dykes open wide for RuBSian SS-20 dildos. Some people thought it might have been the same group who circled the rally dressed in Russian army uniforms and carrying a banner reading "Soviet Peace Contingent." After the rally, GPA was notified that on the following Monday, Oct. 24, there would be more than a hundred people returning to F.I Segundo to engage in acts of non-violent civil disobedience in front of the facilities of five military contractors and the Air Force. All of the gay friends we had met said they would be there. It was still dark at 6:00 a.m. when the protestors started arriving at the staging area in a tiny park. Small groups stood in circles, holding hands, praying and sing­ing, 160 people in all. Some would have to walk over a mile to reach their destination. Their targets were the entrances to the U.S. Air Force Space Division where "space related defense satellite systems are developed; Northrup Corporation which manufactures key elements for the MX missile's guidance system; McDonnell Douglas which has contracts for the Cruise missiles; Consolidated Controls which manufactures the impact fuse for the Cruise miBSilee; Hughes Aircraft which has contracts for the Trident mis­sile; and Rockwell International, a prime contractor for the Bl bomber and five dif­ferent missile systems. A protest flyer being handed out called El Segundo the "'heart of the arms race." Tim Carpenter is an active member of the gay caucus of the state Democratic party. He is also an employee of Robert Gentry, the openly gay mayor of Laguna Beach. Tim is involved with the Orange County Citizens for National Security. It was his group that would attempt to bl~k­ade the main driveway of Hughes with half their numbers, while others would walk onto the property in an attempt to place management under citizen's arrest for the production of first strike nuclear weapons, a violation of International law. Several police vehicle, were parked across the street from the Hughes entrance when the protestors spread their banners across the driveway. A dozen care stopped in their tracks or turned away as a traffic snarl started forming. Then a stati• onwagon rammed its way through the people holding the banner, and a man holding an American flag was carried along a short distance. At that point, the police arrived and started arresting and handcuffing people to cart them off to jail. All the while, Tim was shouting out tacti­cal instructions to hold their ground or run another banner behind the first. There was no violence, and no one waa hurt. Similar incidents happened at the other locations. All toll, 72 people were arrested and most spent three days in jail. Tim explained how many of the protestors were prepared to be arrested and had been briefed on what to expect. Mark told GP A of two gay men he believed had been arrested at one of the other facilities. They had discussed civil disobedience training with him and had expressed their con­cerns about being thrown into jail and revealed to other prisoners as being gay. "I assured them it's not dangerous as long as they weren't blatant," said Mark. "I was arrested August 9th for the Naga­saki demonstration at Rockwell," con­tinued Mark. "I was concerned about being sent to the county jail and facing harassment or the danger of rape. Fortu­nately, I stayed in El Segundo jail, and it didn't become an issue," said Mark. "The thing to do when you're arrested is to blend in with everybody else, but stay close to the group of men you are arrested with and play it cool." Mark wasn't back at Rockwell this morning, but others were. Most were from the Unitarian Church. and among them was Betty Rottger, the elderly woman with the Parents and Friends of Gays but• ton. Betty, who has a life-long history of involvement in activist causes, was carry­ing a sandwich-board sign draped over her wheelchair. "My son's gay," she told us. "He'• a playwright, and he's the one who made my sign for me." For more than an hour, Betty and her friends put their bodies in line across the I I front of Rockwell's tower headquarters, blocking the entrance and singing peace songa. A dozen policemen and a district attorney stood by without moving on the protestors. Rockwell guards i>E-gan send­ing people around to another entrance, and arrests were never made. Betty had been prepared to go to jail, and was possi­bly a little diaappointed that they didn't. In all six locations, volunteer laywers were standing by, observing, taking notes and ready to act if needed. Over at Northrup, Randy Grant, a member of the Harvey Milk Democratic Club, and another gay friend also were prepared to be arrested but were not. Maybe the El Segundo jail was full. Randy said, "l spread my activism between three movements, disarmament, environment and gay rights causea." He also remarked how pleased he was to have had gay rights mentioned several times by sepakers at the rally. It was anotber indication of how gay men and women are openly accepted in the peace movement. The recent issue of The Advocate (No. 380) had several artic~e about anti-nuke gays. One is a first-hand account of a blockade of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratories in Northern California, and a gay man's subsequent incarceration in a makeshift tent-jail for 500 arrestees. Another is about Peter Adair, the film• maker who produced Word Is Out and is now working on a documentary about civil disobedience for peace. A third deals with proposed legislation by California Assemblyman John Vasconcellos, a major gay rights supporter, which out­lines some very innovative ways to start building toward world peace. Among others things, Vasconcellos pro­posed student exchange programs with the Soviet Union, the establishment of a ational P ce Academy and a program called Soldiers for Peace, wherein a hundred thousand citizens from both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. would be inVlted for a yearinto the homes of the other country. The time has come for the creative thinking that has gone into making new weapons to be matched by the creative thinking needed to build world peace. Inasmuch as gay people are not wanted by the military, it might just be time to join the peace movement where we are. \ 11 "wf--l€AJ you u V€ .AT GRouND zcRO, Jc~ ....l \ I .'D"~ J1 DOfSN'1 SE€.M tftAPOkTAtVT IF YOV'Rt GAY <JR S7f{f1/6tf[ .. . , 6 THE STAR / Nov 25. 1983 Robert Sullivan: Gay Man on Death Row By John Kyper Via Gay PreH Auoclation Wire Service Robert Austm Sullivan is used to waiting. For a decade-longer than any other pri• soner in the United States-he has been waiting on death row at Florida State Pri­son and fighting for his life. He stands convicted of a 1973 murder, a murder he says he didn't commit. His wait almost ended in 1979. He came within two days of the electric chair. He probably would be dead today were it not for the energetic support of a volunteer attorney and a few hundred people who have contributed to a defense fund. It all began on Sunday night, April 8, 1973, when Donald Schmidt, the night manager of Howard Johnson's Restau• rant in Homestead, Flonda, disappeared with $2700 of the restaurant's money after locking up for the evening. His body was found two days later at a target range 19 miles away, with two shotgun blasts to the head, said the coroner. His wrist watch was missing and so was his wallet and Mastercard. The card was used in the next few days, and police soon tracked down the user: Robert Sullivan, a former manager of the restaurant who resigned the previous year after an embez• zlement investigation. Sullivan contends he was set up for the murder rap and that he blundered into it. He had just arrived back in Miami after a trip to New England and was staying in a motel with a traveling companion named Reid McLaughlin, whom he had met at a gay bar in Boston. Relations between the two deteriorated, however, when a messy triangle deve­loped with John Lucheck, a former employee at Howard Johnson's. Things got even won,e when Gilbert Jackson, who both Sullivan and McLaughlin knew in Boston, flew in to spend the Easter vaca­tion. One day, McLaughlin showed Sullivan a Mastercard issued to a Donal Schmidt and said that Sullivan could use the card to repay expenses. McLaughlin said he had been going out with Schmidt and had borrowed the card. So Sullivan took the card and bought clothing He also took a watch that McLaughlin lent him because his own watch was in for repair. Those were the worst mistakes he ever made. The following day, Sullivan saw an account of the robbery-abduction-murder m the M1am1 Neu a. Angnly he confronted McLaughlin, who finally confessed. Among his versions, McLaughlin claimed that he had committed the crime with Luchek. They had borrowed the shotgun and shot Schmidt twice. He was later to tell various cellmates that Jackson was the actual murderer. Sullivan and McLaughlin were arrested on April 16 while driving home from a bar in Borward County. The car was searched even before they were read their rights, revealing a shotgun in the trunk a'!d a pistol in the glove compartment. Police also found the Mastercard and what they claimed was the victim's watch on Sulli• van His protesls of innocence and repeated requests to call an attorney, whom he had left only momenta before at the bar, were ignored. Police ~lied Sullivan for more than eight hours before booking him. and he confessed. Meanwhile, McLaughlin signed a state­ment that named Sullivan as the killer. Gilbert Jackson was released at the arrest scene after a brief questioning and was never brought to the police station or called as a witness. Sullivan was pitifully naive, believing that his confession would be thrown out of court and that he would get a fair trial. But his father, a surgeon, refused to hire a law• yer. Instead, Sullivan ended up with a pub­lic defender, Dennis Dean, who never contacted five people whom Sullivan said could testify that he was 40 miles away at the Broward County bar at the time of the crime. After his arrest, Sullivan had deliber ately stated that he had beat Schmidt m ~ the head with a tire iron and shot him four times, knowing that these statements would be contradicted by the autopsy report, Sullivan says Dean neither con• tacted any of the alibi witnesses nor exposed contradictions in the confession and in police teetimony. He failed to note that the defendant's feet were larger than the footprints found at the scene. Dean says he tried to contact the witnesses, but admitted to a Rolling Stone reporter that his enthusiasm was dampened by the belief that he was defending a guilty man who had failed a lie detector test. In court papers, Dean has been accused of provid• ing an inadequate defense. At his trial, Sullivan was portrayed as a cold-blooded killer wanting to commit the perfect crime. Then why, one wonders, would he have used the credit card of someone he had just murdered? He was quoted as saying during the interrogation, "I always wanted to commit a murder," a remark he denies he ever made. One of those testifying against him was McLaughlin, who slipped during cross examination and admitted, "My sentence will depend on my testimony." (He received life with the possibility of early parole and was released in March 1981.) Dean did not pursue the slip, asking few questions of the state witnesses. He also neglected to reveal that McLaughlin had failed four out of seven lie detector ques• tions. The police, prosecutor, judge and jury all knew of Sullivan's homosexuality, and the prosecutor made repeated compari­sons to Leopold and Loeb. But there was no Clarence Darrow to get him off. He was found guilty and sentenced to die. Robert Sullivan was the seventh person sentenced under Florida's new law. He has lived on death row since November 14, 1973. He first appeal, automatically granted by the statute, was to the state supreme court, where his death sentence was the first one to he upheld by a 4·2 vote. In 1976, during the week of the Bicenten• nial, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled death penalty Jaws in Florida, Texas and Geor­gia constitutional and shortly thereafter declined to hear Sullivan's direct appeal. (Theoretically he still has one more chance at the USSC before exhausting all appeals, provided he is not executed firsl) State legal aid is provided to capital cases only through the first appeal, and Dennis Dean officially withdrew from the / ~/ case in October 1976, leaving Sullivan without representation. Friends. shocked by the realization that Sullivan was being left to face a severe predicament alone, formed a defense fund. Through the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, an organi• zation that repreeenta indigent death row clients regardless of race, he met Roy Black of Miami. the first attorney to take an active interest in his case. He is volun• teering as lead counsel, assisted by Anthony Amsterdam of New York Uni• versity Law School, the nation's foremost authority on capital punishment. Black wants to get a new trial for Sullivan, but his most urgent task has been to keep him alive. Sullivan's case was presented to a clemency board in 1977. The ruling was negative, and Governor Robert Graham signed the death warrantonJune 19, 1979. Execution was set for 7 a.m. on June 27. Sullivan was taken to the superintend­ent's office to be informed of his new sta• tus then taken to a cell behind the ex~ution chamber. He began to plan his own funeral and burial arrangements. Roy Black left his sickbed to argue for a stay of execution before the Florida Supreme Court on Friday the 22nd. A stay was refused by a four-to-three vote. In a bitter blow, Justice Boyd, who had voted for Sullivan in his 1974 appeal, had switched his vote. Yet Chief Justice Arthur England's vigorous dissent was adopted by the U.S. District Judge Jose Gonzales three days later when he granted an indefinite stay 38 hours before Sullivan was to die. Sullivan had survivE'<I the week with the support of many friends who wrote him and a few who visited him every day. "It was not easy to preserve the balance between having hope and yet also prepar· ing for the worst," he wrote just after his stay had been granted. Cardinal Hum• berto Medeiros of Boston and a number of other bishops sent telegrams on his behalf to the governor. In a way. the signing of the death war• rant proved beneficial for Sullivan. As a result of the nationwide publicity brought by his plight, two new witne88es, William Harlow aad Peter Tioighe, came forward to sign sworn statements that Sullivan had, mdeed, been at the Broward County bar at the time of the murder. They were among the names he had given his public defenden, to contacl Harlow had good reason to remember that night: it was his 18th birthday, the first time that he could legally drink in Florida. And there have been new developments concerning evidence in the case. The adhe­sive tape that had bound the victim's wrists had two fingerprints that did not belong to either Schmidt, Sullivan or McLaughlin. When examining police evi• dence in 1978, Roy Black discovered that a clerk had destroyed the tape. And recently, Black's private investigator, Vir­ginia Synder, has ascertained from the victim's family that the Waltham watch found on Sullivan at his arrest was not Schmidt's, as had been alleged by both McLaughlin and the police. His watch, they informed her, "was very definitely a Timex." Snyder also has succeeded in locating several more alibi witnesses. But one-the man at the Broward County bar who claimed to be an attorney-has refused lo talk. Other obstacles have arisen. Five days after being contacted by Black in August 1978, Gilbert Jackson was found mur­dered in his Winthrop, Massachusetts, home. The late David Brill, reporter for Boston's weekly Gay Community News, was also investigating the Sullivan case and believed in his innocence. Not long before his mysterious death in November 1979, Brill's car was broken into and his briefcase taken. When the briefcase was recovered, the only file missing was Sulli• van's. In the four years since the death watch, attempts to obtain a new trial have met with a series of legal setbacks in the federal court system. At the beginning of 1983, a three-judge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta unanimously rejected his appeal. In May, the full court refused to reconsider the rejection. The next step is to appeal to the Supreme Court. If he loses there, the governor of F1orida would sign another death war• rant With all appeals exhausted, Sulit van 's execution would be virtually certain, possibly before the end of the year- unless his lawyer could produce new points of appeal to persuade a judge to issue a stay Contributions for his defense may be sent to the Robert Austin Sullivan Defense Fund, Ralph J acobs, director, 53 Leice,5ter Road. Belmont, MA 02178. Gay Man's Execution Again Scheduled By Chris Church/Nite S.,ene Via GPA Wire Service TALLAHASSEE-Florida authorities, in response to a second death warrant signed by Gov Bob Graham, have scheduled the execution of condemned killer Robert A. Sullivan, 36. for 7:00 a.m. Nov. 29. Sullivan, who has spent a record 10 years on death row for the shooting of a Dade County (Miami) restaurant man• ager, received a stay of execution from a federal court in 1979. He presently has an appeal pending in a Miami circuit court. Love is a Drug A Minnesota group called "Sex Addicts Anonymous" sounds like a joke, but it isn't. Founder Patrick Carnes says people get hooked on sex just as easily as drugs or alcohol, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer. Sex addicts, he says, come from all walks of life. They often start off as high achievers who end up squandering their money, time and self-esteem to support their habit. Carnes says he treats sex addiction much like alcoholism: the first, crucial s tep. he says, is getting victims to admit their desire for sex is making their lives unmanageable, National Gay Pride Committees Coordinate '84 Plans B;v Ernie Potvin V,a GPA Wire Service Sixty conferees repreaenting gay pride organizations from 18 American cities met in San Diego in October to exchange information and coordinate plans for next year's celebrations. It was their second annual conference, and participation was three times greater than last year's gath­ering in Boston. Eighty-two cities are now known to hold some form of gay pride event, be it picnic or parade, carnival or concert. Ten ofthoae citiea have gay marching bands, and all of them have agreed to come to Los Angeles next year to participate in that city's parade as well as in a combined concert in the 18,000-aeat Hollywood Bowl. The 1984 activities will mark the 15th anniversary of the Stonewall rebellion. The weekend conference was hosted by San Diego Lambda Pride and was held in San Diego's big, new MCC church. Two days of useful workshops on a variety of topics occupied most of the conference time. Topping off the weekend was a well­attended dinner in Balboa Park, to which the community in general was invited. The workshop sharing of ideas and experiences on such subjects as securing permits and dealing with police and government agencies was extremely help­ful. The Boston and New York committees reported on the succeas ofhavin~ incorpo­rating suggestions offered last year by Los Angeles, including the handling of secur­ity and the reversing of New York's parade route. Wichita introduced an innovative button promotion which intrigued the Los Angeles committee, among others, and may be taken under consideration by several cities next year For the first time a single national slo­gan was agreed upon by the various pride c·ommittees represented The option of also uRing It for local celebrations, or creating one's own, was left to each indi­vidual city Los Angeles has already agr!'Cd to adopt the na tional slogan for its 1984 parade and fl'stival. Olympics and I.A. is extending an invitation to the en tin• country to Join them in making it a massive affair. The national slogan is "United & More in '84." A uniform poster for national use will be designed to incorporate the slogan, and the I.as Vegas committee has offered to handle its printing and distribution. Las Vegas holds its gay pride celebration in May and has also extended an invitation to others to come to "fun city" and join them. At the San Diego gathering, a stirring welcome address was delivered to the con­ferees by Harry Hays, the founder in 1953 of the early homophile organization the Mattachine Society_ He spoke of the ~eed to recognize that we are a "separate peo­ple" with a special gift with which to cele­brate e':'ch other. A radical gay who speaks hke a poet, Hays left his audience in standing applause. San Fransico writer Armistead Maupin was the guest speaker at the closing dinner, along with Barbara Cameron an Indian and gay activist from the Si~ux nation. Entertaining were singer Kate Beck and Romanovski and Phillips on piano and guitar Of all the gay pride organizations Christoper Street West of Los An geles i~ the only one to belong to the International Festivals Association (for five years) which includes the Tournament of Rose~ Parade, Kentucky Derby Parade and New Orlt>nns Mardi Gras organization, among others. CWS had two representatives at IFA's recent convention in Phoenix where they set up a display and introduced the several hundred delegates to what a pride­ful gay celebration is all about. The response was very positive, and two other IFA members e.xtt'nded an invitation for I.A.'s Gay Freedom Band to participate in their nationally tt>levised parades in Mil­wauk!' C and Atlanta. Nov 25. 1983 / THE STAR 7 . , . , '-t!~-.,.,,. 11r•- · · !~ Dallas Benefit Nets ••~ ·-}~ -~--~~-tl..1. 1.1.1 $20,000 for t -.. Gay Groups i.~ ~ :.·,j~l~~ • --.~ ,.. -e ,;;?,:;_ By Joe Ba.ker/ Dallu Gay New• DALLAS-Two hundred and forty-eight /I: gay men, lesbians and friends shared an !>. _ { I/ evening of "Visions" last Saturday night ~~.,_._ A San Antonio Tradition .,. ~· ~ ·. to benefit the Human Rights Campaign 106 N S A 223 Fund and the National AIDS Lobby Pro- 8V8rrO an ntonlo -7177 ject. More than $20,000 was raised. The El Jardin opened in the early 40's and has improved with time like all great masterpieces. Now a San Antonio tradition, but better than ever. We will be open Thanksgiving Day from noon to 2am. Nellie Hour 12 to 7pm every holiday and Sun­day with 75¢ Bloody Marys, 75¢ Screwdrivers and 75¢ Beer ,. ,'CA-A t . PLACE Monday-Pitcher-$2 Tuesday-Draft-25C N E V E R C Wednesday-Beer Bust 7-11-$2 O V Thursday-Margaritas-75C Sunday-Beer Bust 8-10-$1 OPEN 2 TIL 2 E R 2015 SAN PEDRO 733-3365 SAN ANTONIO The Dallas Dinner Committee's second annual black-tie dinner at the Fairmont Hotel attracted 100 more people than last year's affair. Attending the $150 per person dinner were gay rights leaders from throughout Texas and the country and several elected officials, but most of the guesta were "just plain gay folks" who were committed to advancing the cause of human rights. Tue evening was entitled "Visions." Helping guests to share their visions were keynote speakers U.S. Congressman Bill Green (R-N_ Y.) and Virginia Apuzzo, exec­utive director of the National Gay Task Force. "The cause of gay rights is not a 'them versus us' situation," Green said in his address. "Gay righta is human rights. A government that permits discrimination of gay men and lesbians endangers the human rights of all." Green, one of the earliest supporters of gay righta and presently one of the staunchest and most effective supporters of AIDS funding legislation, told his audience that both lobbying and educat­ing are important in furthering the cause of gay rights. He said elected officials and the public have a lot to learn, but stre86ed that "America i1 learning." "We are talking about a human rights matter, and that is how it should be pree­ented. I know there is still a lot of misun­derstanding and prejudice, but we can succeed." Green, who repeatedly Wied the pro­nouns "we" and "us" when discussing the fight for gay nghts, called the Human Rights Campaign Fund one of the more powerful political action committees in the country He urged gay men and women not to ignore the Republican Party m their strug­gle. "Progrl!ll8ive Republicans are rebuild­ing," he said. ''There are candidates who deserve your support and contributions. Let them know you are prepared to help them if they help you. Hold them accoun­table." Green said human rights legislation­gay rights-should be supported by both progressives and conservatives in all the political parties. "Thia 1hould be an issue especially dear to conservatives who believe in less government interference," he said. "Government has no business legislating in anyone'• bedroom." Apuzzo told guests that it was an act of courage for them to attend the fund­raiaing dinner, and noted a lot of them were at different steps in their personal involvement for gay rights. "We are making history," she said. "Thirty ye1m1 ago we were told that we were unemployable and that even one of us would contaminate a work place." "Well. we have made a lot of progress. Today we are not 'criminals' and not 'men­tally ill.' We have come a long way." Apuzzo praised the DallaB gay commun­ity for its leadership in the gay rights movement, and said she was inspired by the local involvement. She said the primary mission now of national gay leade~ is to galvanize a vision . .. Our mission must be be to work for all ofthose\l<;thout privileges. We must struggle to bring honor,justice and reasor to politics. We have to make governmen more reeponsive to our lives." 8 THE STAR/ Nov. 25, 1983 Gays' Dress Influencing Nongay Men Smaller Cities Felt Impact of Gay Vote Br. Ernie Potvin International Gay New• Atrency The gay movement "has had an extraordi­nary influence" on male fashion, accord­mg to designer Lee Wright, who recently agreed to do an exclusive collection of menswear for J.C. Penney. Wright says that there has been a grad­ual revolution in the way men dress them­selves. Traditionally men would shop for themselves after the entire family was out­fitted. Now, more and more males are thinking about their image and taking time to shop for themselves. Wnght attributes this change to the gay movement. "It's a known fact that gay men have a more estheticsensibility about them, and it carries over into the nongay community," Wright said. Wright is the third well-known designer to join the Penney team. Halston and Cathy Hardwick are already creating col­lections for the store that are geared toward the Middle America customer-in other words, the budget-ronscious consu­mer. V a Gay Pre•• Aa•oclation Wire Service In November's municipal elections across the country, theimpactofthegayvotewas felt in several cities. Also noteworthy was the fact that many of the mayoralty winners were liberal women and blacks who sought and received the support of the gay commun­ity, Big city gay political clubs supported and helped reelect mayors Diane Fein• stein in San Francisco and Kathy Whit­mire in Houston. They were also deeply involved in the election of Philadelphia's first black mayor, Wilson Goode. Yet another interesting story was tak­ing place in much smaller cities where young gay political groups were making an impact. In Sacramento, the gay community's six-month-old River City Democratic Club was the city's only political organization to support Anne Rudin for mayor in the primaries where she won a second place runoff spot. They supported her again, along with the local gay press, in the Nov. 8 general election where she narrowly won the city hall race by less than a thousand votes. Her opponent, Rosa Relles, did take the opportunity to do some gay-baiting during the last days of the campaign. He pub• lished a widely distributed flyer which did not receive prior approval from the elec• tion board, and included a brief, edited and misleading list of her backers. It was limited almost exclusively to gay, feminist and environmentalist endorsements. The River City Democratic Club, for example, was listed as the River City Gay and Les­bian Democratic Club, and her only press endorsement on the list was shown as Mom. GIU'ss What (a gay newspaper. In the Sacramento Bee, the city's major daily, Rudin said, "Ross Relles' list of endorsements is woefully incomplete and purposefully so. They were intended to get knee-jerk reactions from voters." . Prior to the isauance of the controversial flyer, Relles was believed to be leading !n the race. Whatever its effect, Anne Rudin would not have won the mayor's seat with­out the strong support she received from the gay community. In Charlotte, N .C., a city of 300,000, the small but influential Lambda Political Caucus helped elect Harvey Gantt, that city's first black mayor. The Lambda Cau­cus, which boasts less than 12 members, staged three candidate nights before a larger gay men's social/educational group called Acceptance. Each mayoralty candidate appeared separately to answer questions and state his position on gay :ivil rights. Democrat Harvey Gantt said he would work to add sexual orientation to Char­lotte's nondiscrimination ordinance, while his Republican opponent, Ed Pea• cock, felt it was not needed. Also appearing were eight candidates for 11 city council seats. Don King, of the caucus, said it was the best turnout Lambda Political Caucus ever had in their three-year history. Electing a liberal black mayor in a state that has become increasingly conserva• ti ve in the last 20 years is no easy feat, especially in a city like Charlotte, where whites outnumber blacks by three-to-one. Gay Events Get Noted in the Non-Gay Press Br. Jim Kepner The Lambda Caucus met early with Gantt at a breakfast strategy meeting, they did widespread leafletting for him during both the primary and general elec­tion and finally they set up a telephone bank to make a thousand calls to potential gay supporters and their friends. Gantt, a Democrat, won by 4000 votes out of 80,000 cast. It can be safely assumed that many of them were gay people. He had been the first North Carolina candi• date to take his campaign into a gay disco and discuss gay isaues. V a Gay Pree• Aa•oclation Wire Service In a scattering of local elections which saw pro-gay candidates elected in several cities (and homophobe Kathy MacDonald defeated in Georgia by a 3-2 majority), the New York Times ran an Oct. 8 feature: "Increasing Political Influence of Homo­sexual Citizens is Sensed Acrosa U.S." A quarter of the half-page story dealt with Rich Eychaner, Republican cndidate for Iowa's fourth Congressional seat. including Dea Moines. Eychaner, chal­lenging a solid Democratic incumbent, calls himself "a qualified person who happens to be gay." He is a Methodist Sunday School teacher, owner of the state's largest mov• ing van company, a baseball team offirer, a TV talk show host-and popular instate GOP circles. The Times article, by Dudley Clendinen, traced the close relationship between the gay community and Washington, D.C.'s Mayor BalTY, Houston's Mayor Whitmire (reelected) and other• office holders in Sacramento, Boston, San Francisco, Phi­ladelphia and Key West, where business­man Richard Heyman this month became the third openly gay mayor to be elected in the U.S., joining mayors of Buncetown, Mo., and Laguna Beach, Calif. The article (cramped by the Times' ref­usal to use the word gay except in quota­tions) discussed how often gay voters support black candidates and spoke of the growing "rainbow coalition " It noted former gay-baiters who now court gay votes and discussed victories and plans of the Human Rights Campaign Fund, the r-iational A880ciation of Gay and Lesbian Democrats and the National Gay Task Force. Granting that homo~exual efforts to assert their political influence proceeds "by fits and starts," the article rounded off on college instructor David Scondras' race for the Boston City Council. Said Scon­dras, "The age of bigotry is eclipsing, and the age of coalition-building ii; begin­runir.'' The gay-baiting of l::!111 Allam, Missis­sippi's Democratic gubernatorial candi­date, was labeled "dirty politics" in many newspapers and in Newsweek-and by the son ofWilliamSpell.oneofthe lawyers who charged Bill Allain's sexual activity with at least three black male prostitutes. Allain denied the "damnable" charges, taking a lie detector test-and won elec­tion handily, proving again that gay­baiting is no sure-fire tactic. But gay political clout was nosed out in Musach11Betta by a 19-18 Senate vote sending the Gay Rights bill to the state Supreme Court for an opinon-unlikely to be ~e)ivered beforf the legislature adjourns. The only attention this got out• side the state was 10 lines in USA Today (Nov. 3). The Quincy, Masa.,Patriot Ledger (Oct. Tl) quoted Rep. Gerry Studds saying that being a closet gay is living hell: "I've been in public life 10 years, having to deal with everything from hysteria to irrationality to hatred and plain ugliness ... having to live most of your adult as a closet gay person necessitates developing a very tough skin, or you'd ... go stark, raving mad.'' Several papers picked up bits of this interview. generation Californian, Broughtoi:i at 80 remains vigorous, witty and committed to shocking his audiences, as he had early tried to shock his conservative stepfather. Seven days earlier, Guthmann did a fine piece on gay Russian filmmaker Serge Eisenstein, whose documentary Que Vwa Mexico, left unedited at some 50 hours, was slashed up by socialist "producer" Upton Sinclair, who objected to the ~tlm• maker's erotic treatment of Mextcan youth. In Charlotte, as in many similar cities in the nation, some candidates are afraid to go after gay endorsements, believing it could harm them, but that attitude has already begun to change. There appeared to be a lot of cross-over voting in Charlotte on Nov. 8, for not only did liberal Gantt win but a good number of the city council seats were won by conservative Republi­cans. San Francisco columnist Herb Caen on Oct. 29 reported on Don Jackson's St. Pria• pus Church, whose slogan is ''Sex can des- +­troy evil." Jackson, who believes oral sex f is sacramental, launched the "December '69" drive for gays to occupy underpopu• lated Alpine County, Calif. A St. Ptjapus Church is expected shortly in Los Angeles. On Nov. 8, Caen reported that the gay­oriented Atlas Savings and Loan now has a straight president-whose wife is named Gaynelle. United Press International on Nov. 5 reported a University of California/ Davis study showiryr that 14 percent of the women surveyed had been sexually harassed, mostly by male faculty members. One-point-one percent of the men surveyed reported having been sexu• ally harassed on campus. The study didn't say by whom. Time on Nov. 14 reported a more damning study released at Harvard. The Los Angeles Times reported on Nov. 8 that four prisoners in three days had died in local jail facilities, reportedly by suicide or heart attacks. Three were in on sex charges. Gay news is rare in the newspaper busi­ness sections, but the Securities and Exchange Commission's action suspend• ing trading of shares of Gay International for 10 days, a San Francisco-based com­pany that publishes the Gay Areas D,rec tory and owns several gay hotels, was reported by the San Francisco Examiner and the Los Angeles Timi's on Nov. I. The SEC questioned the firm's financial eta• bility and the accuracy of publicly di~sem• inated information. Gay International went public in April and took ove: the San Francisco based telephone directory. Their 1tock has since climbed from 35e to $3. Company officials claimed hara88• ment. They own extensive Utah and Hawaii real eetate and are seeking to acquire property in Idaho and California. Edward Guthmann turned in a fine ret• roepective on poet, avant-garde film­maker, incredibly elfin performer and radical fairy James Broughton for the San Francuco Chrorucle, ~ov. 6. A third- • GAY NEW~• INPDRMATIDf' • • COMMUNICATIONS• ·-------~-~--~---------~--~-----------· U Regular Subscription $30 • Trial Subscription $15 • Send me more information, please. Name _____ ___ ____________ _ Address_ _________________ _ Ctty· _______ _ __ State ___ Ztp _____ _ Type of Computer _____ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NE!W_DRK c/o Montrose Voice Publtshmg 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 , Good Taste, and Why Not? By Allen Young "Good taste" is supposedly a matter of spe­cial concern to gay men. When a gay man lacks good taste, whether in his clothes, hie home decor, his conversation or his behavior, he is said to be "tasteless," a word that in today's gay banter has become a campy exclamation. (For some reason, all of this seems less relevant to gay women, which is why I refer ony to gay men here.) A friend of mine who writes for Fag Rag, one tasteless enough to burn a Bible at a Gay Pride rally, has on several occasions expressed his mockery and disdain for this gay male preoccupation. He see it, I believe, as a kind of faggot snootiness, an attempt by gay men to use esthetic values to find respectability in upper-middle­claaa heterosexual society. My friend's Bible-burning must be forgiven if only because it spurred much interesting dis­cussion about religion's role in gay oppres­sion. AB for his condemnation of faggot You're Reading THE STAR America's Newest Gay Community Newspaper preoccupation with taste, I have been until recently quite sympathetic with his point of view. I am beginning to .r!istinguish, however, between good taste that is simply an honest appreciation of beauty, and a fashion-oriented concept of taste sometimes known as "piss-elegance." Pies-elegance is something I find irk­some. The Qut>en's Vernacular (now pub­lished by Paragon Books as Gay Talk) defines a piss-elegant queen as "one equal• ing wealth and style with real achieve­ment; one who lives in ham I gance." (A second definition of the term says it is a "jealous reference to a rich homosexual.") Since coming out into the gay world, I have met a few gay men who could be described as "piss-elegant," and a few oth­ers who manifest a self-conscious preoccu• pation with taste, based on airs, manners and fashion.Such men are not likely to become my close friends. But I have also met some fine artists­men (and women, too) with a well­deve loped esthetic sense and a commitment to creativity. The gay friends and acquaintances have meant a lot to me. They have opened doors for me to realms previously unknown, and they have taught me something about good taste. I use that term in the moat positive way. Twelve years ago, my main idea of something attractive to put up on a wall was a brightly colored Cuban poster show­ing fists and guns, supposedly to express solidarity with the people of a beleaguered Store Owners Are you a STAR distribution point? If not, become one. There's no charge and you'll find it will bring people into your business. To be a distnbutton point, we require you to piece the newspaper in a lighted. eas1ly-access1ble locatton. end be able to distribute et least 25 copies each issue. (Some locattons go through 400 to 500 copies each issue.) Your location will be printed in the paper each issue. Third World nation. In general, the idea of having attractive surroundings was then of little concern to me. That was before I was part of the gay community. Ifl were to list the things I have learned from my involvement in gay life, I would have to place at the top this newfound concern for beauty in my immediate surroundings. And why not? Our lives are enriched by beautiful things, both manmade and natu­ral. This is one of my disagreements with the radical left, which focuses so much on negativity. There is often no room for beauty in their world; they see most art as "politically incorrect," for according to them. we muet alway• be aware of suffer­ing and injustice. Frankly, I don't want to look at fists and guns anymore, neither in real life nor in posters on my wall. I feel sorry for the oppressed artists who are vic­timized by political commissars, whether they are movement ideologues or Commu­nist party bureaucrats. For such commis­sars, art is "bourgeois" unless it "serves the interest of the working class," wha­tever that is. Some might claim that it is middle-class privilege that allows me this concern for beauty. But poverty and squalor are not synonymous. When I lived among the Zinacanteco Indiana in southern Mexico, they manifested a strong desire for beauty and excellence in their colorful clothing. The Indian man I lived with, who was weaving a new staw hat for an upcoming festival, made it quite clear to me that he had "good taste" and also that he felt a certain disdain for men in the village who did not take the time and effort to make their hats beautiful. All of this is really by way of introduc- 1 d1dn t like the way I looked when my hair was falling out Then I found out about the HRS Systems Process ol hair replacement It added hair into my bald spots and made my thinning areas thick tion. as I want to share with readers of this column my appreciation for the work and friendship of an artist I know, Gerard Brender a Brandis, whose wood engrav• ings are among the decorative items in my home. Ger, a Canadian who lives and works in Ontario, is one of several artists I have met in the gay community. I was introduced to hie work through RFD, the country gay journal, which published some of his engravings of rural architec­ture and plants. Shortly after, a feature article on him in Body Politic made me aware that hie temperament and lifestyle were much similar to mine. Eventually we met, and we now have become friends. We are now collabo.-ting on two booke. one on Cape Cod, another a collection of quota­tions, both to be published through Brand­stead Press. Brandetead Press is Ger's own creation and was established 11 years ago to pro­duce limited editions of wood engravings and linocuts. It now has facilities to per• form every stage of production of hand• made books, from papermaking to binding. Ger's primary work has been botanical illustrations. but in recent years, he has sought to bring his gayness to his work, and the result has been two volumes of illustrated gay poetry. But, as Ger wrote me in a letter I excerpted for publication in Lavender Culture, overt gayness in art is not essential: "What is more important is to realize that the pre•• ence in my life of interpersonal realtion­ships nourish my entire being and spill over into my creative processes. just as my creative vitality makes me more capable of contributing to another man ·s life." Ger's work has won him significant recognition; it is included in may public By Brackenridge Park. 3-438 N St. Mary's San Antonio 78212-(512) 736-9678 Nov. 25, 1983 / THE STAR 9 Commentary galleries and university and library collec­tions, as well as in numerous private col­lections. His dedication to his craft is inspiring: imagine working a book from start to finish, including weaving the cloth for the cover, making the paper, engraving the illustrations. handsetting type and operating the printing press! Yet, for all hie success. Ger does all he can to keep from being "sucked into the subur­ban, commercialized and consumerized­too much a part of the trendy gay scene, too much a businessman." He writes, "My life and lifestyle appear too often relevant. and yet there is no real alternative on this planet." These are my feelings, for when I leave the typewriter today, I will go into the garden to plant carrots and eggplant, spend some time in puttering around the house to make it more pleasing to me, and a little later, go to the bus station to pick up an old friend whom I haven't seen in years. These pleasures-the manmade beauty in my home, the natural beauty of the plants in the garden, both the functional beauty of vegetables and the "pure" beauty of flowera. and the love of friends in the gay community whom I have come to cherish so mucb-help make life nch and worthwhile. I refuse to rob myself of these pleasures just because I know that there is pain and suffering elsewhere in the v.'Orld. My appreciation for beauty does not under­mine a desire and hope for a better world; in fact, the two are inextricable. C/983 by Allen Young, author of several books, including ''Caya Under the Cuban ReL'Olution" and "Lavender Culture." Du­tributed by Stonewall Features Syndicate. We Serve The new Central Texas gay publication. Every Other Week, we inform and entertain thousands in Austin, San Antonio and Corpus Christi. Look for THE STAR every other Friday at your favorite club, shop or store. 10 THE STAR/ Nov 25, 1983 Star Classified Fourteen-Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn Sat NOV. NOV. 25 26 NOV. NOV, NOV. NOV. DEC. DEC. DEC. 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. 4 5 6 7 8 For ~t10nal W'lfonna110n or phOne numbe:B for events ;ate<I beJOw ook for the aponsortng organa• t10n unde, Orgat11Z•ttons n the The Slat's Ckrectory Selected Events First Week • FRIDAY-SUNDAY: Gay Acadenuc Umon 9th National Conference "The Challenge of 1984. Together We Can Make a Difference," San Diego •sUNDA Y: 5th Memorial Harvey Milk George Moscone March, San Francisco • TUESDAY: Austtn Lesbian Gay Pohtical Caucus meets 7 30pm Nov 29 Commissioner's Court, Courthouse Annex • THURSDAY: First day of Hanukah Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 3 WEEKS: Winter begins at 4:31am, Dec 22 • IN 4 WEEKS: Chnstmas, Dec. 25 • IN 8 WEEKS: NOW's Lesbian Rights Conference, Jan 20-22, Milwaukee • IN 9 WBE.KS: Gay Press Association Southern ~onal Conference, Jan. 27-29, Houston • IN 11 WEEKS: Uncoln's birthday, Feb. 12 • IN 11 WEEKS: Valentine's Day, Feb 14 • IN 12 WEEKS: Washington's birthday. Feb 20 • IN 14 WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday, March 6 • IN 16 WEEKS: SL Patrick's Day, March 17 • IN 18 WEEKS: Apnl Fool's Day,Apnl I • IN 24 WJ::EKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov 11 • IN 26 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Convention, May 25-26 Los Angeles • IN 26 WEEKS: Memonal Day, May 28 • IN 29 WEEKS: 1964 Gay Pride \\ eek begins 15th anniversary of Stonewall upnsmg national slogan "Umtcd & More l.f 4 " June 15-24 • EARi,'}' JL'L'l': Lesbian and Gay Bands of Amenca concert, Los Angeles • /l"i 29 "EEK : National Gay Health Education Foundation's 1st International Lesbian Gay Health Conference 'Toward Divennty" New York June 16-19 • II\ 34 WEEKS: Democratic ~ational Convention, San Franc co, July 16-19 • I.V 38 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San Francisco • IN 39 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens m Houston Aug. 28, lasting to SepL 2 ANNOUNCEMENTS 8lG. E OWNEAS We li$1. rree eaeh weel: n ""'.,,_ c:on,muntty "'!l•nlzatons p1u9 ~ ser,mo u drstnbution points for THE STAA i" nchcates Uus tSbng 19 • ST AA chstnbution Poffll DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES HISTORIC HOUSTON HOME Outstanding opportun ty for gra­cious living in a beautifully restored V1C1onan Home n Houston In the National Register and winner of the prestIgIous TC Jester Restoration Award, thls4000squarefoot 3-story Houston Heights Home may be used residentially or commercially Built in 1905. It sits on a corner lot with over 13,000 square feet of land, an English rose garden, 2nd story deck enclosed patI? quarters above a 3- car garage, and room for a pool. The home has 4 unusually large bed­rooms, 2 baths, wrap-around ver­anda leaded glass, an updated country kitchen. high ceilings. hard­woods, stenciled walls roomy for­mals foyer, dramatic staircase, sleeping porch 1 O tons of air condI­tIonong (zoned) 2 fireplaces and charm beyond descropt,onI For further onformatIon call (713) 861- 9996 $239 500 subJect to prior sale EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED STRINGERS WANTED "The Star" seeks free-lance news writers In Austin and San Antonio for assignments Send samples of your Nork to Henry McClurg "The Star," 3008-A Burleson Rd Austin, TX 18741 GAY BARS AUSTN e Baca Ml Bao -4511 E 7th 477"3391 • Boat Haute- ,,107 Cototado.-474-9667 • Chances -900 Red Rtvet _.77-82 • Otrty Sattys Apartment Z828 ~fO C..rande­• 78--8782 e PQ'z,z "'°' :oaorao,,.. • 7.t 7003 e PrvateCettar 709E h- 4n..Q387 e Red River C.rossing 61 Red Aver 476-381 1 • Round Up Sa 705 Red R ver 4 7&-6806 CORPUS CHR -r Oden Door 1003 Morgao Av -882-0183 e ty JI k 2 •13 Peoples • Span Gaffeon- St 7 N Chapar"II -18 -0510 • Sandbar 408 ayto, 884-027 e Zod I '617 S Stapfes 883- 1753 UcAL E'I eum,,e,o- OOPeca Ourtys 1 N Mad Box 200 N 2911"1 SANANUC 0 e Phase I 2226 herwOOd Way 942-9•88 e One NiQht Sa!.oon-11 5 fredenekaburg 736-- 9942 • Our Place- t 15 Gen l<TUegll'f -3-I0-17S8 e R.a.~&LJGf'ltC:C,.. -2'315SanPedro- 734 3399 e San ~o M!ning co-826 S.r, Pedro-223- 020 • $nutty• Satoon ..a20 t>an Pectro-224-1739 e SunaetBoutev•rd lQONManAv ~ • Talk of the Town-3530 Broadway--826-9729 e ro15 Place------2015 San Pedro-7J3.-336S ORGANIZATIONS SELECTED NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS-Gay Prnt Auodelion-P08 33e05 WHhlngton DC :zoo:n.......(202) 387 2430 GavR11o1ritsN• t.10nall.Obtly-P081992 WattunglOn DC 20013- (202} ~t1Ct1 Human Riorus Clfflpaign Fund P08 1396 W•h-- 1ngton OC 20013-{202) 5,48.-20,25 Lambda Legat o.,..,.._,32 W 4Jrcl ,.._ Yon,, NY 10039~12) 9'4-NM Meet • Fund for Human A.ghtt (Gay Prn• Auoetation POB 33605 Wutungton DC 20033 (202) 387 2"30 ...._,ion•t ~ or 8usaMU Coundla Boll 1514 Sanfr•nc.ilCO CA9411S- 41! fl8S-l.l63 Nall()Ma AdOdahOn of Gay ,& Lab&an Oemoc;rat c Ouba 1142 ~ >,.v SE Wahington DC 20003- "702) M74104 N11K>NI Gay HNlth EduUtion FounOatM)no «> 8th ,.,., • 30& New van NV •0011 212 206-1009 National Gay Rights Ai,voeates 610 Cu1ro San F-.nc:lSCO CA 94114 (41S 863-3624 NatiONI Gay Task Force ao 5th Av N..,,, YQrtl NY •0011 (212' 741•5800 NGTF'1 Cr• st,,.. 800) 22 · 7044 (OUtstdll New Y?rtl State) Tex• Gayl'LMt»an Task Force POB AK Denton 715201 (817) 387-12•& AUSTIN AUii n Lesb an/Gay Pol t cal Caucus-POB 822 78767-t74 2717 meets last Tues 7 30pm Comnuasaoner1 COurt CourthOUH Anne,; CORPUS CHRISTl- Gay Bartenders Anoe ation-c/o Zod ac Lounge 817 Stapfes ~77S3 Metropo11an Commuruty Church--clo Un tar• ian Church 3125 Home Rd-851'"9698 SANANTONIO Alamo Human Rights Committee ~74 eM-5485 Otgnity 349-3632 meets Sun 5pm St Patnck1 Cl\urch, 1 35 near New Braunfels & Pine Gay Switchboard 73,3,-7300 Lambda AA 1312 WyomlnQ 674-28Ht Le,bian & Gay People In Meidletne- Box 290043 78280 San Antonlo (jay Alliance-Box 12063. 7821J 733-8315 Free Personals Continue Free Personals (up to 15 words) continue in THE STAR. Send yours in today. See the form in the back for details. THE STAR AUSTIN * SAN ANTONIO ; You cannot ba serious! Nobody attempts su,c1de with a Trak II shaver! PERSONALS DALLAS AREA COUPLE will share home in exchange for same 1n Austin for occasional visits. Call (214) 660-2638 POLISH GAY MAN _ _ 31, passive, black hair, hairy body, wants friendship with active gay. Would like to ImmIgrate to USA. Will answer all. Andrew Hoszowski, UI Warszawska. 15/6, 44-100 Gliw1ce, Poland. CONTACT, FANTASY, FUN Wrestling & more 500 members nationwide lnfopixpak $3. NYWC, 59 W 10th, New York, NY 10011 ByTycho PRIVATE GAY CLUBS SERVICES, ETC. AUSTlii= The Star -448-1380 SANANTONIO Ame<1c1n Male (hatr replacements)-3438 N St Maryt-738-9978 V.111 Moflte Carto--N St Marya at Mulberry- 736-9698 Fortunes For Friday evemng November 25, 1983. through Fr1d1y ev-,iing. December 9. 1983. ARIES-The fire of Anes Is an electrical kind of lire, and this energy Is as strong now as it has been in a long time. Creative sparks are flying. and this energy that's been so strong for a few weeks is having a powerful effect on others. Zap! You're a line conductor! TAURUS-With some outside help In your relationship problem, things are definitely taking shape end direction. Hazy and dangling problems fell away under the shadow of the form your life is taking. Maturity comes in stages, all through your life. GEMINI-Sex comes home. and you're glad of it. Looking for it in strange places was a drain on you. and you·re happier to be on an even keel again. Bright and alert is how you're feeling, glad to wake up in the morning to see who's beside you again. CANCER-"Let me entertain you" Is your theme song. Who do you think you are, a Leo? You've got this urge to perform, to really show others what you can do. Quite a change for the homebody of the Zodiac! Take center stage and have a great time doing itl LEO-After feeling scattered end a bit thrown around, you return to looking to yourself for answers. And it's likely that you'll find the ones you're searching for. You won't be the life of the paty for a while. but you'll be back to being yourstill again. VIRGO-Somebody could trick you into believing the unbelievable. This trick from a possible trick will not turn into a treat. so take heed' Practical advice from someone who's older or who has more experience in these matters could prove very valuable. LIBRA-What looked like a light romance or a short affair may become more serious. It may even change you idea of who you are and what It's all about. There's something of a mystery involved that you may not have yet recognized. When you do, you'll be intrigued SCORPIO-Looking in the mirror and seeing someone you don't recognize? Older and wiser, perhaps, but there's something else, too, that you're just beginning to understand. Your image reflects your mind Fill these days with new and fascinating ideas SAGITTARIUS-Changing careers In midstream could be what you're thinking of. And it could work. You'll probably be getting some kind of offer that will seem hard to turn down. Think long and hard on this one; retreat from the hustle and bustle and consider the facts. CAPRICORN-Joining your life to that of someone else takes care, but it can be as simple or as complicated as you choose. Now that the flames burn bnghtly instead of roaring, you can look to the future and use forethought. 'What are we doing?" doesn't have to be a confusing question. AQUARIUS-II you're not a student, you should be. II you're not Involved in some concrete application of what you know, you're missing the boat. Don't be lazy with your Intelligence. Tep in on your mental resources and use them. Be smart. PISCES-Obstacles may pile up in your path and block your exit. l.fs going to take a combination of practical know-how and whimsy to remove them so that you can get started so that you can get away Your yearning for adventure is strong. Make it happen! •1983 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE BERNIE OH ALAN1 LOOK lfT 1HE PUPPIES. WOULO NT VOU Ut<E TO HAVE ~E '? Nov 25, 1983 / THE STAR 11 STAR CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Personals? Read this: • ANNOUNCEMENTS • CARS & BIKES • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES • EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED • FOR SALE, MISC. • MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS • SERVICES • TRAVEL RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2. Additional regular words 30¢ each. Minimum charge $3. DEADLINE: 5:30pm Monday for Friday's newspaper. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 issues or longer, pay the full run in advance, and make no copy changes during the full run, and you can deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 issues or longer under the same conditions and you can deduct 25%. CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must be paid in advance OR you can charge your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. Placing a • PERSONALS? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words In bold and up to 15 total words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 are 30¢ each.) FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. HOW LONG? Free Personals can be placed for one, two or three issues at a time-but no longer. To renew requires re-submitting the form. BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll assign you a Blind Box Number. The answers to your ad will be sent to us and we will then confidentially forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each issue the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as long as they come In. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address your reply to·the Blind Box Number, c/o The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741. Enclose no money. You·r letter will be forwarded unopened and confidentially to the advertiser. CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box charges must be paid in advance OR you can charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in Classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Personals phoned in. You will be charged the same rate as other types of Classifieds. (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals) (lree or 304/word) __ _ (free or 304/word) ___ _ (30C/word) ___ _ (30C/word) ___ _ (30t./word) ___ _ (use additional paper II necessary) bold headline at $2 __ _ Name __________________ _ __ words at 30¢ each ___ _ Address _________________ _ Blind Box at $3 per issue ___ _ Total Run ad _____ issues ---- Amount enclosed (• check o money order, • cash In person • VISA charge • MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # _____________ exp. date ___ _ Mail to The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741 12 THE STAR / Nov 25. 1983 Back Street Basics austin,tx 611 E. 7th 477-3391 25C $2 Cover I Watch for 1 -­Anniversary Dec. 8, 9, 10, 11 & 12
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