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Community News, No. 10, July 1975
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Community News, No. 10, July 1975 - File 001. 1975-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/664/show/651.

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(1975-07). Community News, No. 10, July 1975 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/664/show/651

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Community News, No. 10, July 1975 - File 001, 1975-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/664/show/651.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Community News, No. 10, July 1975
Publisher AURA
Date July 1975
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 27910176
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Number 10 • July 1975 WP·v~ Cot What You Want I Your State Representatives (.?) In Action - Pages 4-5 Community Blood Drive - Page 2 Discrimination in Dallas - Page 10 Poetry: " Now I'm Thirty" - Page 11 Rappin' with Rip - Page 9 DO IT - Page 11 Houston Comes Out - Page 6 North Texas Gay Pride Picnic - Page 3 Austin Gay Pride March - Page 6 Gays OK in New Mexico - Page 5 DIRECTORY - Page 8 Recap of Texas Gay Conference - Page 3 to be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best day and night to make you everybody else means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight ard never stop fighting. e.e. cummings 35~ GAY PAPER OF NORTH TEXAS DALLAS TO HOST MCC GENERAL CONFERENCE 2,000 Expected To Hear Noble & Pittenger (Dallas) Dr. Norman Pittenger and Rep. Elaine Noble are scheduled guest speakers at the Sixth Annual General Conference of the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan • Community Churches meeting in Dallas July 29-August 3. Rep. Noble, elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives last year as an openly gay woman, will speak at 1 :30 p.m., Saturday, August 2, in the Grand Ballroom of the Adolphus Hotel, conference headquarters. A 1966 graduate of Boston Univer­sity, Noble also holds masters degrees from Emerson College and Harvard University and is a member of the American Association of University Professors and the Massa­chusetts Governor's Commission on the Status of Women. Dr. Pittenger, renowned theologian and author of 54 books including A Time for Consent and Christian Words to a Homosexual, will address the Sunday evening wor­ship session at 7:30 in the Grand Ballroom. Dr. Pittenger, on the faculty of New York's General Theological Seminary for 33 years, is senior resident and member of the faculty of Divinity at King's College Cambridge University in Great Britain. The first four days of the conference will be devoted to committee and board meet­ings and reports. More than 2,000 persons, representing the church's 87 congregations in the United States and several other countries, are expected to attend. All sessions are scheduled for the Adolphus Hotel in downtown Dallas. A111ti11 911111 Oi11Jrillli1111tio11 (Austin) Austin became the first city in Texas to protect gay people against job discrimination when Austin's City Coun­cil passed a comprehensive equal employ­ment ordinance July 10. All city em­ployees and private employees (where 15 or more people are employed) are pro­tected from job discrimination on the basis of age, sex, race, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, or physical handicap. State or federal employees are not covered by the ordinance. The local ordinance is expected to speed up resolution of complaints. Race, religion, national origin and sex are also covered by federal legislation, but EEOC has a tremendous backlog of cases. The Austin Human Relations Commission which drafted the law will handle the complaints. Violation of the ordinance will carry a maximum penalty of $200 fine. Janna Zumbrun of Austin Lesbian Or­ganization was one of those who testified for the bill, and she got a favorable recep­tion from both the Council and the aud­ience. A similar ordinance was intro­duced last January but was defeated by a different council. Zumbrun reported that there was little opposition this time; only two people testified against the bill, and the council unanimously voted in favor of it. Fort Worth's only Gay Organization Meetmgs are held every other Monday •t 7 :30 p.m. at 5536 Jacksboro Hwy. (T.J .'s Back Door! I or information call (817) 338-0 128 or \\rite A RA, P.O. Box 7318 Fort \\orth, TX 76111 Memt>er of the TEX,~S GAY r ASK FORCE Social I JT0!1 tical I Service I Educational $15,000 $14,000 $13,000 $12,000 $11 ,000 $10,000 $ 9,000 $ 8,000 $ 7,000 $ 6,000 $ 5,000 $ 4,000 s 3,000 $ 2,000 $ 1,000 Fort Worth MCC Launches Building Fund Drive (f.t Worth ) Rev. R(1n Anderson, pastor of Agape Mctropoli· tan Community Church, has announced a campaign to assure even tu al purchase of property to house the church and related community activities. Mure than a thousand dollars has al­ready been raised for the church's building fund. which has a goal of $15.000. Accordtng to Rev. Anderson, the church, which currently leases facilities from the First Unitarian Church at 2800 Pur­ington, has long recognized the need to have f ull-t1111e facilities in order to better serve the community. Any property pur­chased by the group would also have space available fur a com­plete communi ty center with service:. which might encompass a clinic, alcoholics group, theatre, you th group and coflee house. as well as office space for other area group:.. assured Rev. Anderson. Donations to the fund (marked for "Bldg. Fund") may be sent to the chu rch at P.O. Box 7029, Fort Worth, TX 76 11 1. In addition, Rev. Anderson has urged full community participation in various fund-raising activities which the church plans in the near future. OOPS! PARTY TO HIGHLIG T COMMUNITY BLOOD DRIVE Our apologi to Wayne Ribble, who should have received credit for the photo· graphs accompanying last month's feature on " Daddy's Girls." FREE BLOODY MARYS highlight a party being hosted Thursday, July 24, at 2800 Purington by AURA, local gay or­ganization, in cooperation wi th Agape MCC. Purpose of the party is to encourage participation in the group's community blood dnve. "The party is admittedly a gunm1ck," acknowledged Steve Poyner, 'fGTF ~C llF.D lJ L E OlNCED (San A111011io) The followmg Texas Gay Task Force meeting schedule has been announced by the groups' coordmating council: August 9-10, Houston, council meets: September 27-2 , Dallas, council : December 6-7, Fort Worth. council and Hou c of D\!legates; March 27-2 , Corpus Chrisl!, council; June 18-20, Hou ton, Texa Gay Con­fe rence III. Addi twn.:illy . f GT F ewsletters arc scheduled for publicatton in July, Octo­ber, Januarv and April. Council and 1 lou e of Delegate meet­mgs are open to all members of TC'I f . Information concerning the fexas Gay f ac;k I orce can be obtained by writing fG f I. P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth , 1 X 7(,J f I . ~ C 0\1\IU\f'J' }' VL' B ~~· Jul. Y 1975 coordinator of the drive, "designed to re­assure people that giving a pmt of blood re.illy is a simple procedu re. People can actually spend a few minutes giving and then go partying." A goal of 50 pints has been set fur the drive. The blood. wluch will be drawn on location by professional technicians from John Peter Smith I lospital, will go into a permanent account at the hospital's blood bank until needed by members of the Gay Community (requested through AURA). Transfers may also be made to other parts ol the country in the event of a g;iy tra­gedy such as the Up!>taus Lounge fire \\hich occurred in New Orleans two years ago. Poyner urges all women and men who can to .. give a pint of life" on the 24th and then join in the partying. ·•saving a life really is something to party about," he stressed. Admission to the party ts the donation of one pint of blood or a 2.50 dona· tton to the group's "jail release as 1stance" program. Further informatton is available from AURA at (8 17) 338·0128 or MCC at 534-9406. Persons Y.ho cannot make the party may donate cltrectly to the ac­count at JPS I lospital by telling the blood clerk to designate the donation for the "AURA Pool." COMMUNITY }v ALLEN~.~~.5 Aainld by: Ric:Nrd nn CS.W., Randy Beitel, Ken Cyr, W•YN Ribble, Moody w.lls, Sue Harris, Kay Wileon, l .. G-vlord Ind others. COMMUNITY NEWS is published by AURA (A...._., Unity 8c Reelwch Allociation), not for profit but • a .-vk:e to the Gay Community. Opinions 1tXpr...twe tho.e of the Individual writers and do not nec.­arily reflect the views of this publication or of AURA or lta members. SUBSCRIPTION RATE ii $4 (bt ca.n) or $3 (3rd Cl-) for 12 .-..... LETTERS to tM editor of CN should be signed. However. name will be withMld up­on requ•t. All letters are aub ect to ed1tinv to meet space requirenMntl and to remove potentially libelou1 1Uitement1. Publication of the name of any person, busi· neu or group in CN lhould not be construed • any indication of the sexual prefer•n~ of that person, businea or group. or of their •mployns or members. AD RA TES available upon request. COMMUNITY NEWS, P.O. Bo)( 7367, Fort Worth, TX 76111. (817) 338..0128 TGC II Ten Resolutions Passed by Texas Gay Conference II National Gay Unity Urged for Bicentennial (San Antonio) "We hope that we gay wo­men and men shall be taking our rightful, indeed dutiful role in connection with the Bicentennial. The country belongs to us, too, and we shall not endure another year of the repression, oppression and exploi­tation that we have suffered during our first 200 years, when liberty, justice and equality have been for 'them,' not for us. "We mutually salute the notion of mas­sive Gay Pride Week celebrations for June, 1976." In a resolution ending with these two paragraphs, the Texas Gay Conference II expressed its desire for a nationally-coor­dinated observance of Gay Pride 1976 in observance of the Bicentennial. The resolution was one of ten resolu­tions passed by participants in the confer­ence held June 20-22 at the San Antonio Country and the International Theatre at HemisFair in San Antonio. More than 150 Texans attended this second annual statewide conference which heralds the beginning of Gay Pride Week. The Texas Gay Task Force, which now sponsors the event, was formed at the first TGC held last year in Fort Worth. Participants from San Antonio, Fort Worth, Houston, Dallas, Corpus Christi, Denton, Austin and across Texas heard Morris Kight of the Los Angeles Gay Commuruty Services Center and Carolyn Innes, founder of the Gay Nurses Alliance, address the group on matters relating to the Gay experience and the Gay Move­ment. ln addition, conferees participated in a broad range of workshop sessions with topics ranging from those of interest to professional Gays to those of interest to Gay professionals. Texas Gay Conference Ill will be hosted next year, June 18-20, by the Houston Gay Community. Other resolutions adopted at the con­ference dealt with national gay commun­ication, the Texas Homosexual Conduct law, sexism, Gay teachers, Gay ministers and police harassment. National Gay Communication A resolution was passed calling on the National Gay Task Force to reexamine its role as a self-defined "national clearing house for information relevant to Gay People," stating: "To the knowledge of the participants of the Texas Gay Confer­ence II, the Nattonal Gay Task Force has not served that function in a consistent, systematic and reliable manner . . .. " The resolution further seeks to elicit reasons for this supposed failure from the NGTF and determine if the Task Force plans to assume this role in the future . The resolution also praises NGTF for the work it has done and urges TGTF mem­bers who have not already done so to join NGTF. Sexism The problem of sexism was examined and a resolution passed instructing the TGTF Coordinating Council to "appoint a committee to explore, educate and set guidelines for the gay residents of Texas to facilitate consciousness in an attempt to attain human equality for aJI people .... " Texas Homosexual Conduct Law Rep. Craig Washington of Houston came in for praise for his continuing support of Gay People and in particular for his effort to remove homosexual conduct from the state penal code. Rep. Joe Spurlock of Fort Worth was censured for his lack of concern for his Gay constituents and his efforts to retain the criminality of homo­sexual conduct. Police Harassment The Conference censured and condemn­ed the actions of members of the Fort Worth Police Department at the fust Tex­as Gay Conference last year in Fort Worth. It also urged support for Ken Cyr and AURA in their efforts to improve the (Continued on Page 12) FREE BEER and Gay skits highlighted the first annual North Texas Gay Pride picnic held last month at Queen's Point on Garza-Little Elm Reservoir north of Dallas. Skits were per-formed by a group billing themselves as "Two Dykes and a Queen." More than 50 persons enjoyed the entertainment and the booze. CO\fMUN/T}' W ll'S JUI. }' 1cr 5 3 ..------~\Q;~~~,~~-,~~-,-00:----,-N...-,P--~----,-,~.---.-.-~-l ~--,~~ -p,l ~ .""""'.. . """-" . :·.:1 ""'1t I e llt •• •r•111 ·~ ..... ~ I I 127 "'U.'lt Y H P ..... _ - -.=----- ---.'"-'~..~ ... .----~- ......... ... ........... ... . . Mc0..•4' . """" . -.. ., ...... . ....... -·- ...... --~ ~ .......... x .... ~ -.... ~ v. .... ...._. .. . : :. ) ( . .- . :~· t • .....-..... "---;") : : ·1 '• I I . . •• . i : •. : 1 •• 1 • 1 THIS IS HOW YOUR REPRESENTATIVE VOTED on your rights as a gay person. In the top chart, a check or dot in the "Y" column 1s pro gay, and a check or dot in the "N" column is anti· gay. "Y" indicates "yea," while "N" indicates "nay." The "X's" indicate those members who had excused absences. In the lower chart, a check or dot in the "N" column 1s pro·gay, while a mark in the "Y" column 1s ant1·gay. Was your representative representing your best interests? 4 CO\f.\/Ui\/TVN!.'WS / J !. >' 1975 NO D/FW REPRESENT \TIVE !" PPORTS GAY CONCERNS No matter where you live in Dallas or Fort Worth. you can be sure that the Legislator who is supposed to represent you in Austin failed to represent your interests as a gay person during theses­sion which ended last month . As reported earlier Ill Community News . the issue of whether the private homo· sexual acts of consenting adults should be criminal was brought before the Texas House of Representatives tor the firt time in history when that body debated and voted on the Committee Amendments to S B.127. Than ks to Rep. Craig Washing· ton of Houston. who called for a record vote on the issue, we now have a printed record of how every legislator in Texas voted on this important issue. (See tabu· Jation at left) The record for the Fort Worth·Dallas delegation is pretty d srnal. Other than Rep. Mattox ol D.11las and Rep SI erman of Fort Worth, who were ab ent at the time of the vote. every member of the Fort Worth-Dallas delegation voted to re· tain the criminal sanction against the pri· vate homosexual acts of consenting adults. A worse record could hardly be imagined, for even those legislators whose districts have a si1able gay population, such as Rep. Samuel 1 ludson of the Oak Lawn area of Dallas, voted against gay people . Particularly disappointing were the votes of Rep Chris Miller of Fort Worth and Rep Paul Ragsdale of Dallas who voted agamst the gay people of their districts in spite of their earlier promises of sup· port. This type of political double-crossing together with the lack of support gay peo­ple received from all the "closet" liberals in the D/FW delegation points up rather clearly that gay people will get absolutely nowhere if we continue to sit back and hope that the politicians will help us out of the kindness of their hearts. Between now and the 1976 elections. gay people need to start letting their Legislators know that we exist, that we arc watching them, and that we can vote, too, if we ex­pect a better result the next time we go to Austin. 1~ .1 B . ,anuy e1te 1 • PROMOTE EQUAL PEOPLE THESE ARE YOUR REPRESENTATIVES? Effort ls Its Own Reward lf'ATCHINC THE 1'EXA~ LECl~LATUHE Looking back on all the time we spent in Austin, getting a bill introduced, testi­fying at the committee hearings in April, contacting Legislators and finally the House debate in the last few days of the session, my feelings are best described by a comment which Rep. Leland of Hous­ton made to Rep. Craig Washington as the House was voting fown the bill: "Effort is its own reward, Craig." How true, for win, lose or draw, it was a tremendously exhilarating experience to be openly gay, confronting the homophobia of the Texas Legislature, asserting that we as gay peo­ple have some rights that we are going to claim whether they like it or not. Thus are the rewards of a gay activist. While we did not succeed in repealing the con­sensual sodomy statute, we did succeed By Randy Beitel Unlike previous years when the debate on the criminalization of the private ho­mosexual acts of consenting adults was relegated to the obscurity of sub-commit­tee hearings, this year the debate took place on the floor of the House, right out there in public where any and all could see and hear, anyone, that is, who was still awake and in the House Gallery at 2:00 in the morning on May 29. The debate began rather mundanely, with Rep. Craig Washington of Houston, the sponsor of the bill to repeal the con­sensual sodomy statute, explaining the various non-controversial provisions of the omnibus penal code revision bill in which the gay rights clause had been hidden by the Criminal Jurisprudence Committee. But shortly after Washington began, he was interrupted and asked whe­ther this bill would repeal the law against homosexual conduct - and the debate was on . Laughter, Catcalls from House As soon as the word "homosexual" was mentioned, the House broke out in a rash of laughter, mutterings and catcalls, a mood which was to characterize the de­bate and which often necessitated the Speaker's gaveling the unruly House mem­bers to order so the debate could con­tinue. During the confusion, Rep. Spurlock of Fort Worth introduced his anti-gay a­mendment to Rep. Washington's bill, an amendment which provided for the gut­ting of the gay section of S.B. 127. Thus the real debate continued, centered around the Spurlock Amendment, the pro-gays fighting the amendment, the anti-gays pushing the amendment. Rep. Gaston of Dallas broke into Rep. Washington's presentation, asking whe­ther it was true that "only homosexuals are against the amendment," thus imply­ing that any Legislators who voted in favor of repealing the consensual sodomy statute must be gay themselves. Infuriated at this cheap rhetorical sham, Rep. Washington responded forcefully , "You can persecute people, Mr. Gaston, because you don't understand them, Mr. Gaston; you can laugh about it, but that doesn't make it right .. . . Article 21.06 only allows for the persecution of some people that in my opinion have just as much right to live their life the way they want to as much as you do. And I don't think this is right." Not Politically Wise Realizing that many of the Legislators would vote against the sodomy law repeal simply because of political expediency, Rep. Washington noted that "I know you're going to defeat the amendment ... because its politically wise to do so. But that doesn't make it right." With a breastplate of righteousness, Rep. Salem of Corpus Christi responded with a virtual admission of homophobia: "Mr. Washington, let me advise you that as far as I'm concerned, it's not (a matter of be­ing) politically wise with me - I just don't like it (homosexuality) worth a damn!" Rep. Washington replied, "Well, you're entitled to that opinion, but I don't see how that gives you the right - I might not like the suit you have on worth a damn, but that doesn't give me the right to take it off of you." After some further attempts by Rep. Salem to obfuscate the issue, Rep. Wash­ington cut him off by saying, "You can stand up there and demagogue till hell freezes over ... You can verbally abuse me if you want ... but I put the amend­ment (to repeal Section 21.06) up here because I believe it is right for these (gay) people and I have as much right to my be­liefs as you do to yours." And so went the debate until 2:40 in the morning, with the gay people losing on two votes, 112 to 16 and 117 to 14. 651 SOUTH JENNINGS in making the Legislature aware of our presence as persons with serious argu­ments and claims - and we assured them that we would be back next session, and we will. GAYS NOW OK IN NEW MEXICO (Santa Fe, NM) New Mexico became the tenth state to eliminate penalties for sex­ual acts between consenting adults in pri­vate, effective July 1, when Governor Jerry Apodaca signed a bill repealing the penalties for sodomy. The bill, a compre­hensive reform of the state's rape laws, had earlier passed the State Senate by a vote of 41-1 and the State House by 53-0 with almost no debate. Other states which have legalized sexual acts of consenting adults in private are: California, Oregon, Hawaii, Illinois, Col­orado, Ohio, Delaware, Connecticut and North Dakota. (817) 332-0745 • Fort Worth Happy Hour - 4 to 6 p.m. COMMUNIT> NFWS JULY 1975 5 I Cruising the News I HOUSTON COMES OUT ( f/011sto11) Reprz!;entatives of this city's Gay Community held a news conference th1 month. Their purpose was to inform the public that they will no longer accept. being econd class citiLens. Ray lhll, long-time Houston gay activist and one of the organizers of the new Gay Political Caucus, said questionnaires will be sent to all candidates in the November city election in an attempt to get them to take stands on gay issues. The group will be working for: • Repeal of the state law that makes ho­mosexual acts between consenting adults a 1.:rime: • State Legislation outlawing job discrim­mauon against homosexuals ... as well as removal of the local ban on hiring gays as police officers: • Federal legislation giving partners in gay unions the right to file joint income tax returns: • lnclus1or of the homosexual perspective in sex education classes in public schools. ~-..:.....:. !'Hit COUlO BE YOURt For 011/y 110 Call (817) 338-0128, or write P 0 . Box 7367, Fort Worth, TX 76111 to advertise m Community News. 1, coul!U\11 r ,\1~ ws / JUL r 1<175 Another of the spokespersons, Pokey Anderson of N.O.W.'s Sexuality and Les­bianism Task Force, stressed that women in the group will also be working on re­forms that affect them as Lesbians such as child custody battles. The caucus will also work toward changing the public's image of homosex­uals through full usage of the mass media. Other Gay leaders appearing at the press conference included Jerry Miller and the Rev. Bob Falls, pastor of Houston's Met­ropolitan Community Church, where the conference was held. Response to the announcement was generally felt to be good, as the event was given objective coverage by both major newspapers as well as other media. Support for the new Gay Political Cau­cus from the Gay Community is expected to be good. Organizers include represen­tatives of both liberal and conservative elements as well as women's groups and religious groups. AU TI . GAY PRIDE MARCH By Nina Wouk (Austin) On Saturday, June 28, Austin experienced its first legal gay pride march, which was organized and led by lesbians. One hundred people, mostly women, marched up Congress Avenue to the Capi­tol, chanting "Gay is twice as good as straight" and similar sentiments. One old­er woman joined us from among the small crowd watching; a Chicana with two child­ren gave us a high-sign. The police escort behaved itself admirably;not once were we ordered to disperse. More people join­ed us at the Capitol, where some of us sat on the steps for awhile, making music for ourselves and the TV newspeople. The KTVV sound woman admired our "smash phallic imperialism" sign, while we sang 'Tm gonna grow up to be a dyke" and "you people who don't like me better leave me alone." Then we reassembled on the lawn to listen to women's music and various speakers, including ones from Corpus Christi, San Antonio and Fort Worth. Art Addison of GPA told the oth­er gay men more or less to get organized, LEGGETT LOSES REINSTATEMENT TRY (San Antonio) Rev. Gene Leggett lost another round last month in his four-year battle to regain his credentials as a minis­ter of the United Methodist Church. The Southwest Texas Annual Conference overwhelmingly rejected a petition by Leggett's home church, St. Stephen's in San Antonio, to allow him to perform ministerial functions such as celebration of holy communion, baptism and marri­age within the boundaries of that church. Leggett was stripped of his credentials by the Conference in 1971 after he open­ly acknowledged his own gayness and his ministry to gay people. Bishop Eugene 0. Slater stated at a press conference following the June 2-5 conference: "We do not condone the practice of homosexuality, and consider this practice incompatible with Christian teaching. We could not appoint a self­avowed homosexual to be pastor at any United Methodist Church. San Antonio newspapers gave consider­able coverage to Leggett's struggle, as did two of the three local television stations. as the lesbians had done. Janna Zumbrun of ALO (to whom a big hand and a bou­quet of roses and sunflowers are more than due) said that since the rain held off until after the march, she knows that God is a lesbian. When the rain finally did get heavy, the rally moved onto the Capitol porch, where music continued well into the afternoon. Channels 7 and 36 gave us good cover­age on the Saturday night news, and The Texan printed a short article Monday. The Austin American Statesman, however, saw fit to ignore the march entirely. One of the many good things about the parade was the attendance of gay people from all over the state and some local "non-lesbian" women. One of the bad things was the presence of photographers whom no one had ever seen before or since. For an event organized in two weeks' time, the Christopher Street Day Parade was an mcredible triumph. (Reprinted from Pointblank Times) Three Bars in One: SPEAKEASY, COUNTRY WESTERN & PATIO BAR HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY 5 to 8 A TOUCH OF THE OLD & A TOUCH OF THE NEW WELCOME TO THE OLD PLANTATION MONDAY: 10c Draft Strawberry Daiquiri 90c WHERE FRIENDLY PEOPLE MEET 3717 Rawlin1 • Dallu, Texu • (214) 528-6550 TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY Margaritas 90c % Price Well Drinks Champaign• Night Bloody Marys 60c 50c Glass Frozen Daiquiri 90c SUNDAY % Price Well Drinks Margaritas 90c When in El Paso, visit SUNDAY Free Draft & Food SHOW-$1.50 Adm. THE NEW PET ·sHOP 532-9721 800 E. San Antonio Street MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY % Price Well Drinks Pool Tournament % Price Well Drinks COMMUNITY NHWS JULY 1975 7 MIXED DRINKS 2308 W. ith Street :J:J:l-O:>B6 Fort Worth BEER BUST - Tuesday, 10 to 11 p.m. 2 to 2 - Seven Days a Week I DALLAS Act 111, 3115 Live Oak, 824-9043 Bayou Landing, 2609 N. Pearl, 742·3269 Bon Soir, 4527 Cole, 526-9432 Chuck's, 3019 W. Haskell, 526-9329 Crews Inn, 3220 N. Fitzhugh, 526-9320 Encore, 4516 McKinney, 526·9328 Entre Nuit, 3116 Live Oak, 823-0423 I ,..,...,..,...,..,,,,,...,..,,,,1 I I OLIVE I I BRANCH I I SALOON I I II Happy Hour I s 7 I II I OLIVE BRANCH SALOON I II I Monday Wednesday 5 I 5- 12 p.m. 1 II I 5 p.m. 2 a.m. I5 I 2822 McKinney 5 I Dallas I I 823-0921 824-2770 I w.111111111111111,. 8 COHH \/1'}' '>iLltS JUL>' 1975 Highland, 3018 Monticello, 526·9651 Joe's Place, 3019% Haskell, 526-9329 Marlboro, 4100 Maple, 526-9487 Old Plantation, 3717 Rawlins, 528-6550 Olive Branch, 2822 McKinney, 823-0921 One Way In, 2509 N. Fitzhugh, 824-9227 Ramrod, 3224 N. Fitzhugh, 526·9110 Sundance Kids, 4025 Maple, 526-9173 Sundowner, 2822 McKinney, 824·9304 Swamptrash, 3014 Throckmorton, 526-9438 Swinger, 4006 Maple, 526-9295 T J's, 3307 McKinney, 526-9368 Terry's Ranch, 4117 Maple, 526-9302 Villa Fontana, 1315 Skiles, 823-0372 ALSO . .. Bachelor Quarter Baths, 3116 Live Oak, 823-0432 Club Baths, 2616 Swiss, 821-1990 Coronet Theatre, 2420 N. Fitzhu1h, 821·9489 Studio 9, 4817 Bryan, 823-0447 FORT WORTH Bailey St. Wherehouse, 259 Bailey, 335-0232 500 Club, 500 W. Magnolia, 335-0692 Other Place, 2308 W. 7th, 335-0586 Regency Lounge, 1812 Hemphill, 927-9416 651, 651 S. Jennings, 332·0417 T.J.'s Back Door, 5536 Jacksboro Hwy, 624-0630 Organizations Agape Metropolitan Community Church, P.O. Box 7029, Ft. Worth, TX 76111 , Services at 2800 Purington, office (817) 534·9406 AURA (Awareneu, Unity & Research AS'Socia· t ion). P.O. Box 7318, Ft. Worth, TX 76111 , (817) 338-0128, meetings every other Mon· day evening, 7 :30, at 5536 Jacksboro Hwy. (T.J .'s Back Door) Daughters of Bil it is, Dallas, ( 214) 241 ·4118, mHtings first & third Fridays Dignity, P.O. Box 70, Euless, TX 76039, (me· trol 469-6669, meetings fi rst & third Friday evenings (includes Massi G.0 .0 .D. (Gay Organization of Dallas), P.O. Box 9928, Dallas, TX 75214, (214) 748 9880, meetings second & fourth Fridays Metropolitan Community Church of Dallas, 3834 Ross Ave., Dallas, TX 75204, (214) 826-0291 r.J. I BACK DOOR presents DADDY's GIRLS Every Sunday Night For Reservarions, call (817) 624-0630 DRINK OF THE WEEK Free Beer & Hot Dogs FREE Every Sunday 8-10 p.m. 5536 JACKSBORO HWY. Fort Worth, Texas THURSDAY - SUNDAY 8·00 - 2:00 ······•···········••··•··•····•········· Hobos, a motorcycle social group for women. For more information, contact T J's of Dallas Wranglers, a motorcycle social group for men, P.O. Box 35853, Dallas, TX 75235 DALLAS CRISIS LINE, (214) 241·4118 Texas Gay Task Force, P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth, TX 76111 , (817) 338-0128. SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS - They Support us! Rappin' with Rip DATING & COURTSHIP The other day in the encounter group l conduct we were discussing the problem of weak, frequent, short-lived relation­ships that bear a variety of names (marri­age, union, lovers, spouses, whatever) and all too frequently have one thing in com­mon their brevity. One of the group members said the greatest problem in establishing a relation­ship is the inability to get to know some­one in whom you might be interested: "We have no dating or courtship period," he said. "It's hello, hop in bed, and good­bye; or if the bed hop was good enough, stay together until the luster is gone and then good-bye." This criticism is all to valid. The date as it stands now rarely lends itself to getting to know what the other individual is really like as a person on a day-to-day ba­sis. At most it involves perhaps a show or dinner or the bars and dandng and then bed. While sex is an important part of any relationship, it has taken on an undue importance in some segments of the gay community. Many of the relationships are based on sexual compatibility as op­posed to interpersonal com pa tibili ty. l would not be naive enough to recommend abstaining from sex until commitment is made ; I would, however, like to entertain the idea that putting off a sexual en­counter until some of the other facets of a person are known may lead to a more enduring relationship. Now changing our modus opera11di is not without risk. That "Mr. Right" may just slip by if we don't play the game of sex when we first meet; but, if he is "Mr. Right," he probably will be around for more of an introduction even if we don't hop in to the sack the first night. There is also the problem of how to act in a dating situation. For many this By Rip Corley will be the first time in a new world of having chosen not to get sexually involved at the onset. Take a situation, if you will, where you meet a guy in the bar. You talk and seem to be compatible. As the evening progresses, you both realize a mu­tual compatibility. The hour grows late, but you are still engrossed in one another and do not wish to break this up just now. You go out for coffee and then to the more private atmosphere of his apartment to continue to get to know one another still better. There one turns to the other for a little kiss to relate part of the gratu­ity in getting to know this individual. In most situations, this is the sexual turning point, for one kiss leads to another and so on. This is where it gets more difficult to terminate the evening with only a night cap, good conversation, and a goodnight kiss. Most of us are not programmed in this fashion, and such a situation would be extremely anxiety provoking ... but it doesn't have to be the end of the en­counter. During the night cap conversa­tion, explore one another's interest in meeting again, perhaps the following day for a show or dinner. Talking about the nice points of having met promotes a con­tinuing interest. And provided the eve­ning goes this way, a goodnight kiss should have more meaning than in the past. As this relationship progresses and there are some feelings invested in the other person, hopefully mutually, the question arises about when more intimate contact is in order and whether this indicates that solidarity has entered the relationship. The answer to the first part lies with the two people themselves. There is no time table for a sexual encounter in a relation­ship. Probably when it feels natural is the best timing. As for solidarity, if the sex­ual encounter is looked upon as a further ( Hditor's Note: This colum11 addresses itself to the sexual prorniscuity of the gay male and is not intended to Ol'erlook our wornen readers it's just a fact that promiscuity is rnuch more prevalent amo11g males. Opinions expressed in this and other columns and bylined articles are those of the author and do 1101 necessarily reflect the views of this paper or of its other slafl members.) means of communication and not the zenith of the relationship, then the likli­hood is enhanced of being able to identi­fy solidarity. During this period it may be best to date more than one individual. The one who is most compatible will gravitate in your direction. When this occurs, it is time to consider more serious dating. At this time sexual play may become more important and meaningful to the relation­ship but by no means should it become the overbearing part. This is the time really to get to know one another. During this more serious dating period there probably will be a muting of the roles commonly assumed early in a rela­tionship and each person will slip into who he really is on a da:y-to-day basis. Few of us are the same person to old friends that we were when we were new friends, simply because we tend to make more concess10ns and put our best foot forward to foster the primary relation­ship. This is not necessarily dishonest but is merely a social courtesy due any person we meet. It is also during this time that some problems will emerge. We must recog­nize that when two people get together and intend a long-term situation, there will be some adjusting on both sides due to the fact that there are two very distinct and different individuals involved. If these adjustments are extremely difficult now, the likelihood of them being even more so in an espoused relationship is great. If everything is working out favorably, it is probably time to plan for a period of courtship, during which both of you will be getting comfortable with the idea of a long-term relationship. Regardless of the outcome of the dating period, however, a good deal of growth and mu tu al respect for the other person (and other people) is sure to result from the experience. "Just a general dcscriptio11 \i.'ill do, Mr. Marti11." COMMUNITY Nt'WS JULY 1975 9 Civil Service Board Denies Discrimination Against Gay Dallas City Employee (Dallas) The Dallas Civil Service Board has rejected claims of Steve Childers, a leader in the local Metropolitan Commun­ity Church, that he was passed over for promotion because of his activities in the church and as a gay actlvist. The hearing before the Civil Service Board was the latest development in the battle for equal employment rights that Childers began late in 1974. At that time he scored high on a civil ervice exam for promotion but was not even interviewed for the position. When he applied for a position in the property room of the Dallas police department (for which he was qualified by civil serv­ice classification), a senior officer report­edly told him it was against the code of conduct to hire a homosexual. At the hearing Police Sgt. H.J. Wages told the board that the code of conduct requires all employees to uphold the state penal code. Smee the penal code makes homosexual activities illegal, Wages con­tended, it would be impossible for Child­ers to adhere to the code. Also appearing at the hearing was John Stacha of the water utilities department who denied that Childers was passed over for promotion because of his sexual pre­ference. He explained that the employee B 506 West Magnolia • Fort Worth (817) 335-0692 D ILY PECI L Open Monday thru Friday 4 p.m. - 2 a.m. Open Saturday & Sunday 2 p.m. - 2 a.m. SUNDAY (frc·m 2-10 p.m.: Bloody Marys 50c and Organ Music by Chester York JO I COMMUNITY NLWS I JUI. }' 1975 selected for the post in question made an even higher score on the test than did Childers, who, he said, will still be eligible to apply again whenever another job opens up. Childers charged that the refusal of the police department to accept him amount­ed to religious discrimination since his participation m gay activities are all in re­lation to his work in Metropolitan Com­munity Church. The hearing before the civil ervice board came after a maze of appeals and hearings before other city officials. After the boards' decision that there was insufficient evidence of discrimina­tion, Childers said, "The city government has many gays among its staff member," although most do not publicly acknowl­edge it. "Everywhere around the coun­try laws are being changed in a move­ment to guarantee equal employment op­portunities for gay people." Although Childers is unsure at this time what his next step will be, he stressed that he considers the matter too impor­tant to let it drop. Both major Dallas newspapers, as well as two television station , reported on Childers' battle following the hearing. Penn ylvania Governor Recognizes Gay Right (Philadelphia) Governor Milton J. Shapp of Pennsylvania has issued the first state executive order giving equal rights to Gay People. The order read, in part, "I am commiting this administration to work towards ending discrimination against persons solely because of their affectional or sexual preference." The order further et up an apparatus to implement the governor's order. Two tate government employees were instructed to review and monitor the progress. The order instruct- COURT A YS MCC OK (San Francisco) The U.S. District Court here has ruled that the California state pnson ban on Metropolitan Community Church services is unconstitutional and ordered that the ban be lifted unless the California Department of Corrections can prove that the church services consti­tute a "clear and pre ent danger" to the DALLAS & FORT WORTH ministers of Metropolitan Community Churches got together in Fort Worth last month at the South Central District Conference of MCC. Left to right; Rev. David Carden, assistant pastor, Fort Worth; Rev. Ron Anderson, Ft. Worth pastor, and Rev. Jim Harris, pastor of the Dallas church. G.0.0.D. GETS FACE-LIFT By Lee Gaylord (Dallas) After a good deal of time and effort, the membership of the Gay Organ­ization of Dallas unanimously approved a new constitution and statement of princi­ples on June 20. The changes made were felt neces. ary for the future growth of the organization. New officers were also elected at that meeting and are: president, Larry Lingle; vice president, Darryl Brown; secretary. Lee G:trylord; and treasurer, Randy Moreau. Additional information about G.0.0.D. may be obtained by calling the organization at (214) 748-9880. ed, "They will work with state agencies and private groups to further define the problem and make recommendations for further action. State departments and agencie are instructed to fully cooperate with them in the effort to end this type of discnmmation." "good order" of the prisons. The court held that MCC is a bonafide church, that it docs not teach or preach homosexuality or sexuality of any kind, and that the ban violates constitutional guarantees of freedom of religion. The two-year-old suit was originally hrough by Rev. Jo eph Gilbert of Sacra· mento and Rev. Tcre Rodenck Now I'm Thirty . Now I'm thirty . I've been a faggot all my life. It was in grade school I became aware "Don't play with that; it might come off in your hand!" Maybe if Billy plays with it, it won't come off in his hands. I love Billy. Yes, it must have been grade school. Too bad Billy died! Now I'm thirty. Junior high and then high school. Teenage boy play, experimenting. We all did it. And then girls. Jim got married. Now I'm thirty. You've got to fight it boy. You can be like the rest. I just have to give myself a little more time-- time-­time-- Now I'm thirty. I'm glad to sec you have accepted yourself for what you really are. It took you long enough and you sure put up a fight but it's over now and you've adjusted nicely and---but-- Now I'm thirty. I met some faggots tonig11 t. Real live flesh and blood faggo ts just like me. I guess it's the first time l ever met a real faggot before. You know, they're human when you see one up close. But, you see for me it's too late--- Now I'm thirty. It's lonely in a closet and the hinges become rusty from years of despair and after tears the door can't open and your closet becomes your crypt. Thirty is enough-- is enough-- is enoug11 ... Anonymous ·········· · ······· · ·································· · ············· · ········~ COMMUNITY NEWS only S3 - 3rd Class. S4 - 1s t C lass SIO - Supporting Name -------------------- Address __________________ _ City/State/Zip Make dit>ck payable lo C0!\1\1UNITY NF.WS PO Box 7:167, Furl \\orlh TX 76111 I I I I ···•·•···········••······••······•···•·····••·•••···•······•••••····•······· literary Cay" "DO IT!" Puzzle by Ario A N E I v I v H A L L - u 0 N 0 s N I K c I D A G E N E T D R D x 0 E N D I c K E N I A N T R u G c T p D v N A c A A R s u u H I H M ~ 0 B c E A A D E D G T c y R B p u T E A M I H 0 M s p s H A L T H F 0 R N H A E D L I w T E 0 I 0 D D K v H p L T T G M I c I A w p A s E N E G v A v H A H p B A R N E y A H s The hidden words listed below appear forward, backward, up, down or dia-gonally in the puzzle. Find each of the hidden words and box it in as shown. Auden (W.H.) Homer Barney (Natalie) LeDuc (Violette) Cocteau (Jean) Sappho Dickinson (Emily) Shakespeare (Wm.) Forster (E.M.) Stein (Gertrude) Genet (Jean) Vidal (Gore) Gide (Andre) Vivien (Renee) Ginsberg (Allen) Wilde (Oscar) Hall (Radclyffe) Whitman (Walt) T .J .'s of Dallas COMMUl\f/TY VJ WS JULY 1975 I 11 ••••••••••••••••••• NEVER A COVER CHARGE 1812 HEMPHILL Fort Worth 927-9416 •••••••••••••••••••• 12 I COJfMUi\'/TY NEWS I JUI. y 1975 POINTBLANK TIM ES A New Publication for Lesbian/ Feminists Subscribe: Only $3 for 12 issues Pointblank Times, 1241 W Bell .. No. 4, Houston, Texas 77019 Texas Gay Conference II (Continued from Page 3) police situation in Fort Worth. Gay Teachers Support for Jim Eggeling was expressed in a resolution concerning his battle against the Harlandale Independent School District, which fired him after dis­covering his Gayness. Gay Ministers The Conference joined in support of the Rev. Gene Leggett in his struggle to be reinstated as a minister of the United Methodist Church. Leadership Resolutions of appreciation were also passed for Gene Leggett for his work on the Conference and Ken Cyr for his work with TGTF . JOIN NOW! TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE P.O. Box 7318 Fort Worth, Texas 76111 Basic Membership Low Income Membership Contributing Membership Supporting Membership Patron (more than $100) $10/yr $ '5/yr $25/yr $100/hfe $_/life Name --- -------- ---- - --- --- - - Addr- - ---- - --- - - ---- --- - ---- City/State/Zip -- ----------- ---~-- T~~hoM ____________________ _ TEXAS GAY
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