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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 1, September 1978 - File 001. 1978-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/584/show/567.

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(1978-09). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 1, September 1978 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/584/show/567

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 1, September 1978 - File 001, 1978-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/584/show/567.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 1, September 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date September 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ....-------free I a austin .vol. 3. no.1 se·ol. '1978 ,. =--2 ___ gay austin GAY AUSTIN is the monthly publication of Gay Conmunity Services. The advertisements signify that the following businesses sup­port the work of the organization. Patron­ize these establishments and, above all else, let the people know that you appre­ciate their equal, Open-hearted support. ADULT BOOKSTORES All lvnerican News 2532 Guadalupe 478-0222 Stallion Bookstore 706 E. Sixth 477-0148 BARS Austin Country New Apartment Private Cellar 705 Red River 472-0418 282d Rio Grande 478-0224 709 E. Sixth 477-0387 BODY AWARENESS Safari Growth Studio 2004ls Guadalupe 472-6828 COIN SHOP Capital Coin Company 3004 Guadalupe 472-1676 LAWYERS Legal Clinic 501 W. Twelth 478-9332 PRINTERS Red River Women's Press 908C w. 12th 476-0389 RESTAURANTS Old Pecan St. Cafe 314 E. Sixth Private Cellar 709 E. Sixth EDITOR Kelly Kay CONTRIBUTORS Bob Scott Li~d Steve Akin Art Morris 478-2491 478-9732 Greg Calvert David Morris David Dole Harvey Neville All1ne Hogan Carr Strong ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Art Morris OPINIONS expressed herein are those of the writer or editor, and not necessarily those of Gay Comnunity Services nor the advertisers. The publication herein of any individual's name, portrait or photograph is not an indi­cation of that individual's sexual orientation. CONTRIBUTIONS and LETIERS for the October 78 ; issue of GAY AUSTIN should be mailed or de- # livered by September 23 to the GCS offices: 2330 Guadalupe, no.7 Austin, Tx. 78705 Torrmy Connell, GCS' new Office Coordinator GAY AUSTIN is published by Gay Conmunity Services of the University Y, 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Tx., 78705. The coordinators of GCS are: Art Morris Gereral Coordinator Troy Stokes Finance Coordinator Tonmy Connell Office Coordinator, incl. peer counseling Speakers Bureau Coordinator Media Coordinator Publications Coordinator (vacant) Bruce Aleksander Kelly Kay contenls VIEWPOINT The Future of Gay Radical ism by Greg Calvert ••..•.• . ....... . . 3 Everywhere at Once: violence in gay austin by Bob .. . . .. .. . ...•....... • . •. .. 4 NEWS .•.••.. •.....•...•••. ••........ .. ...... 5 A DASH THROUGH GAY AUSTIN A Gay Night on the Town by Scott Lind ................... 8 ~ GCS: serving gay austin for 3 years by Art Morris •••..•.........•.. 10 A restaurant for gay austin by Harvey Neville ..•.•.•....... 11 gay austin at play •••.•.•....••..•.••.•..• 15 FI CTI <Ji The Enchanted Doves of Farathastan by Steve Akin .................. 12 Classified ..•.•••...• . .......•..•. back cover Ca 1 endar ...•...•. .• ...•••................. 16 COVER by David Dole v~i~e:::::.J.......!w...!._fp:::::::..__:o=--:i:--=n:....=....::l:..___ _________Se ,_tpemb~!:_ 1978 GAY AUS-'-'-TIN.;..;_ _3=- The Future of Gay Radicalism BY GREG CALVERT EDITORS NOTE : this article is a copy of a speech made at the Gay Freedom Rally in Austin 's Wool­ridge Park on June 24, 1978. Today I want to address myself to the question : Where is the gay movement at and where is i t going? And to ask what is our relati onsh ip to other move­' ments for change in America? Then f inally, I want to ask the question : Will there ever be a broad movement for change that has the kind of spirit and unity and willingness to work together that wi ll make fundamental changes possible in this country? Let me say that if we are to find the answers to those questions we need to understand what happened to that movement of the l~O's which called itself the New Left and which seemed for almost a decade to offer such hope for changing America before it tore itself apart. I want to focus on an important aspect of those problems by telling a story : In late 1970, after a year of watching what we had called the movement tear itself apart, I was living in Chicago and suffering from a very bad depressi nn and thinking about going to work as a psychotherapist (at least partially because .I couldn't afford to see one). One morning I read an article in a Chicago newspaper about a psychi­atrist in Boston who was working with Vietnam vets who'd come home from he war an freaked out or cracked up. And he recounted some of the stories told by those men about their experiances in Vi et­nam. One of those stories made an indelible impri­nt on my consciousness. It was the story of a GI who had been driving a truck down highway 1 in South Vietnam. There was an ARVN soldier along the side of the road on crutches with one leg missing f rom battle wounds . And this Vietnamese soldi er-­th i s"all y"-- was trying to fl ag a r i de . So the truck stopped and they pi cked up the Vietnamese so­ldier and drove on down the road. And the Vietnam­ese soldier was so grateful that he reached over with his hand and squeezed the leg of one of the GI's 1n a gesture of thanks. And then the soldier, the one who later cracked up and was in treatment with the Boston psychiatrist, became enraged and started yelling "You fucking queer" and with the help of his buddies pitched the Vietnamese amputee out of the truck and killed him. WHEN I READ that story, I was overwhelmed with a sense of grief and despair and my d~pression got lllJCh worse. Because what that story did was trig­ger a lot of feeling inside me about what it meant to grow up in America where men were taught to be afraid of their tenderness toward each other and where that conditioned fear was then manipulated to make men into obedient soldiers, willing to fiqht and kill in wars that were not in their interest, to maintain a system of domination and power which re­assured their shacky ego's that they were part of a manly enterprise of which they could be proud. I was also increasinglydepressed because I had to face the fact that the very movement of American young people, who struggled to stop that war and of which I ha~ been a part and to which I had given the best I knew how to give, had embodied many of the same sexist values which warped the minds of those soldiers in Vietnam---so much so that I got trashed for being gay by both male and female com-rads in the very organ izati on (SOS) where I had spent several years of my l ife as a f ull -time or­ganizer. So much so that women left t he movement en masse to avoid t he psychol ogi cal damage in fl i ct­ed by macho leade rship. That story about the Vi etnam soldier, together with the experience of betrayal in t he Americ an~ew Lef t , syllbolized for me a si tuat ion of apparent hopel ess­ness in whi ch the possibi l i ty of breaking out of t he vicious cycle of what America had become seemed completely unrealizeble. And I 'm sure that my feel­ings were shared by many activists, especialy women and gays who had suffered from both 'the casual day­to- day sexism or the more calculated, occas ional brutalities of that mtn'ement of the 1960's, were also shared by many sensitive straight people. Just as the movement of the 60's was falling apart, two newly vitalized forces for change werebeg1nning to emerge in a powerful way. Feminism and gay lib­eration werebeg i nninq to raise in the arenas of cul­ture and politics ttie very issues which their pred­ecessors had failed to face and which challenged the very foundations of macho dominated sexist movements . Out of these new movements was emerging a vision of personal, cultural, and political change that pro­mised a fudamentally di fferent di rection for society and suggested the possibility of a truly holistic poli t i cs, i nfus ed with a truly revolut ona ry culture. THUS, JUST as the new left of the 60's was dying, something new was being born which contained the seeds of a vision of human liberation which could only arise when the issues of feminism and gay free­dom were adressed. It has taken most of t he decade of the 1970's for us to absorb and e 1 abor ate t he impact of the trans­fo nnati on. And al t hough we sometimes feel t hat too little has been accompli shed, we need also to appre­ciate the immensity ot the progress which has been made. Once again in 1978 there are winds of change blow­ing in this country. Once again in Austin and else­where people are talking together and finding ways to work together where that hasn't been possible for s1x or eight years. Once again, after the bankrupt­cy of the Nixon conservatfves has been followed by the impotence of the Carter liberals, Americans are starting to ask basic questions and point to answers that suggest fundamental solutions. What's more, this time around we're part of it. As we try to understand what lies ahead of us--the challenges and the tasks--there are pitfalls we might be wary of. In the newness of the moment, we must go beyond the temptation to hide in new ghettos or to erect new walls. We must not live on the com­fortable edge of the village where we were once sent as outcast~ but make our home in the center of the city--in the open center of public. Let us not turn the discovery of ourselves as gay people into a new trap. continued on page 7 ~ GAY AUSTIN September 1978 violence in gay austin Everywhere at Once By BOB I'm back. Was I gone? Lots has happened here. I have a dull, pressing pain in my head, near the top, and a teasingsore throat. It could be the heat here, the climate. I've been gone three months, and I'm not used to it. But it also could be gonorrhea. I don't know. My tongue is not swollen. When Steve got throat go­norrhea his tongue swelled, and he had trouble speak­ing. Last I heard he was taking tablets and waiting for the swelling to go down. His doctor told his mo­ther he had a staff infection. Or was it strep throat? I can't remetd>er. This ts a violent place. At least it seems so. It's probably no different than any other. In June, so I'm told, a friend of a friend of mine had it in mind to bring s0111eone hOllle with him. This friend of a friend, I hear, is blond and baby-faced . I imagine him with a tan, and blue eyes, though I can't say for sure, as I've never met him. He lived in an apartment, alone, as of June. I don't know where he 11ves now. This friend, as I say, wanted someone to go home with him, to have sex. He likes Vaseline Intensive Care Lotion. I used to use that a lot, but I quit, partly because I was scared of what mi~ht be in it. Also, you can't eat it. At least I can t. I don't know anything about the next part, so I won't speculate. I have thought about it, but I don't want to share my thoughts. This friend of a friend was found stabbed 108 times. The police say there was lotion all over the apart­ment I'm told, and all over the body, particularly in the rectal area. They asked my friend if he could explain why that might be. They said others they had talked with were reluctant to discuss it. My friend didn't answer them. I don't blame him. I don't like rhetorical questions, and I'm sure they are worse --~~~~~~~~-- ·~· && ·----· · -·- 2532 Guaclalupe ''!Fo-t. //,.e acli11e man'' the 11••1 selection In. .c.u.l.u, l.t • .... Aaywherel coming from police officers. All the knife holes were in his back, someone told me. Someone else said his face was also bashed in. I'm not sure I should believe all I'm told. Original­ly I was told the guy was sta~bed only 20 times, a la Goodbar. It may be like that irrmortal fish story, about the big one that got away. No one ever told me that story, but I know it. I never liked fishing. The grandparents of this friend of a friend knew he was homosexual. His parents didn't, at least not until after he was murdered. I don't know how they feel. They might have been close to him, which of course would make a difference, but circumstances make that seem unlikely. After all, they didn't know he was homosexual. My parents don't know about me, either. That says something , and then again •• I do plan to tell them, perhaps in tile near future, preferably before I get murdered. The odds are in my favor, I suppose. Still, they haven't caught whoever freaked out and killed the friend of my friend. Work on the case has been slow. The police have some semblance of a des- . cription, and they have given it out to the bar ow­ners in town. Last week a bartender thought he saw someone who matched the description, and he called downtown. Two hours later someone showed up to check it out. I think the lead fizzled out. My throat feel$ better. My head still hurts. I real­ly don't think I have gonorrhea. About a month after the murder, one of the kid's fonner lovers killed himself. I guess the murder wasn't the only thing on his mind. His business wasn't doing very well, I'm told. He had been de­pressed. I didn't know him, and as far as I know none of my friends knew him either. The former owner of one of the local gay bars killed himself, too. The bar hadn't been doing well at all last spring, and just before I left (did I ever go?) the owner closed the place down, and put it up for sale, I guess. They say he was under severe pressure. Something about back taxes, I have heard. I don't know if the bar can be sold, at least as a bar. And of course if it does reopen there's no guarantee it will be a gay bar. It wouldn't sur­prise me in the least if it were straight. That would leave us with four bars, three bookstores, the baths, Pease Park, street cruising, and several social and political organizations. Oh--and the various and sundry tearooms situated across town, but those don't really interest me anymore. I don't know. Somehow moving to San Francisco just doesn't seem to be the answer. We've lived there all our lives anyway. Just last year, a gang jumped a guy in a parking lot down the street, and murdered him in the name of Anita Bryant. He was a friend of a friend, too. news MCC DEDICATES BUILDING The Metropo11tan Convnun1ty Church of Aust1n dedicated its building 614 E. Sixth Street August 6. Jeff Bishop, worship coordinator for Austin's MCC since the spring, was officially installed as Interim Pastor of the church by the Rev. Don' Eastman, assistant coordinator of the South Cen­tral District of UFMCC and pastor of MCC Dallas . THe South Central District includes congregations in Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and sou­thern Missouri. The MCC Austin congregation has just completed refurbishing and air-condit1oning the church building. On August 4 the congregation approved its local by-laws and granted permission for incorporation of its board of directors. The church's petition for charter has also just been completed and church members expect to be fully chartered by October. KTVV NIXES NBC'S 'SGT MATLOVICH' IN AUSTIN After holding the made-for-TV movie 'Sgt. Matlo­vich vs the US Air Force' ' for nearly two years since filming was completed, NBC scheduled the show for Aug. 21. But unless you caught it on San Antonio's KMOL via cable, you didn't get to see the movie here in Austin, even though local newspaper TV listings indicated it would air at 8 p.m. Aug. 21, a Mon­day. KTVV, Austin's NBC affiliate, apparently cancelled the film at the last minute, showing instead the ~iss Texas pageant and a documentary on tornadoes. As late as the Friday before the show was to air, a KTVV spokesperson assured GCS that 'Sgt Matlo­vich' would be shown Aug. 21 at 8 p.m. as sche­duled. So why did KTVV cancel the first television pro­gram ever whose central theme concerned the hu­man and civil rights of gay Americans? General Manager of KTVV Al Tanksley told GCS that he made his decision to cancel the show based on his perception of viewer interest. He said fur­ther that at the time of the decision he did not know that the film was based on fact nor that it was an NBC premiere movie. Tanksley said that NBC us~ally promotes its movies very heavily before their first run and further that NBC al­most never premieres a movie in the middle of August. Tanksley said that no one at the TV station consults the gay c011111Unity or reads the gay press and that he had been unaware of the importance of the Matlovich case to the gay conmunity. Leonard Matlovich, awarded the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, two COflmendation medals and a meritorious service medal as an offi­cer of the US Air Force during the war in Viet Nam, was honorably d1scharged from the Air Force in October, 1975, seven months after having told his comnanding officer that he is homosexual. Matlov1ch's court battle to rejoin the A1r Force 1s still before a US Court of Appeals. .... ..,.;.·· Septelllber 1978 GAY AUSTIN MCC MINISTER LICENSED TO PERFORM 'HOLY UNIONS' The Rev. Dr. Jeff Bishop, Interim Pastor of MCC Austin, is licensed by UFMCC to perform Holy Unions, and lists the following requirements for tho~e wishin9 to be united in Holy Union. --Each party must be legally single, widowed or divorced at the time of the union . If a person has been previously married to a person of the opposite sex, the divorce decree must be fi nal. If a person has previous ly had a Holy Union, that Holy Union must have been offici ally dissolved under UFMCC proceedi ngs. --The two parties must have l i ved together for at least one year. --The two parties must not be involved in an ' open relati onship'. --Both parties must be regular participants in church worship services, whether at MCC or another church. --Both parties must be of legal age. --Both parties must as a couple attend three counseling sessions with the minister with each session spaced at approximately a two week interval. --The minister's honorarium is $25, which does not include the cost for use of the church. LESBIAN/GAY DEMOCRATS OF TEXAS HEAD TO STATE DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION IN FT. WORTH In preparation for the semi-annual Texas Democratic Party state convention, over fifty gay delegates and alternates have fonned a new organization called the Lesbian/Gay Democrats of Texas. The cau­cus may be contacted through the Texas Gay Task Force, Box 2036, Universal City, Tx., 78148, telephone (512) 655-3724. 5 wom€n's P~€ss 12th st austin. t€JAS 78:'03 TFWU Support ~ter 2·oolor •llk..,....n 13.00 plua tax (~12) -476·0389 RedRiwr~'a~ UNION BUG lll1k-...d - t~ -t-T-uirt, varlet)' ol oolON, '4.00 plu• taa I L_ ~~~~J-._-~~-~-~=.-..~ ..~ -. =..=.·.~.- =--=-=--·-=---~-~~---l ···~ .... HORE NEWS .•• VENEREAL DISEASE #4 Now along with the old favorites of gonorrhea, syphillis and herpes, there is a new disease benching sexual athletes. Gfardfasfs, caused by the intestinal parasite Gfardfa larnblfa, has been linked to male homosexual activity. According to researchers, the ailment may be contracted following rectal intercourse with either oral-genital or oral-rectal sex. Symptoms to be on guard for include nausea, abdominal cramps and fecal tumult. NEW AUSTIN LESBIAN FEMINIST NEWSLETTER OUR TIME HAS COME, a lesbian feminist newsletter published once each month in Austin, provides information and serves as a forum for the divers­ity of views held by lesbians. The newsletter is conmitted to political action and to helping to create a real sense of the lesbian conmunity. Our Time Has Come will also include poetry and short stories and other examples of artistic and creative lesbian self-expression. The publication is a project of the Our Time Has Come collective, and open collective of four lesbians. Pick up a copy at the COlllllon Woman Bookstore or at WomenSpace. II r HAVE LIVED AND SLEPT IN THE SAHE BED WITH ENGLISH COUNTESSES AND PRUSSIAN BAUERINNEN (farm women) ••. NO W()llAN HAS EXCITED PASSIONS N40NG WOMEN MORE THAN I HAVE ••. " ANOTHER PLACE N TIME By Amne Hogan We roun n roun n up again go lfckety split so fast fn light at window Glass twixt us n it -- FLORENCE ltlGHTINGALE, in one of her letters Shelves line up go lickety split n fall the lamplight s fighting light at window n glass twixt it n it go crackety pop s tiny tongues's slivers n 11ckety split we here again n lickety spl ft n lfckety split n lickety slit we here again go roun THE NEW GAY RADICALISM continued from page 3 An even greater mistake would be to assume that any model from the past can tell us exactly what gay freedom means in this time and place. We must be willing to explore and discover the ever new in our gay humanness and what treasures it holds both for ourselves and all humankind. No one can provide those answers for us. Neither Budd~a nor Jesus nor Baba Ram Das--nor Marx, nor Lenin, nor Chair~an ~ao has the final word on human growth and freedom. Liberation is both an 1ntensely personal experience and a social process. Those who treasure the per­sonal without involvement in the political sphere run the risk of escapism. Those who talk of poli­tics divorced from the struggles and unfoldings of the human heart run the risk of dogmatic irrele­vance. I feel that as gay men and lesbians we have a spe­cial role to play in this exciting process. Not the game of "better than." Not the arrogant role of van­guard. But the special role that comes from the spe­cial experience of being gay. Change in this country is not going to be complete without us. The human spirit will not be free until the fear of us is overcome. And without that, human beings will never know who they truly are--will never finally be able to .look at themselves in the mirror of society without fear. They will never experience that coming home to an acceptance of GREG CALVERT lives in Austin and works here as a gay psy­chotherapist. He was a long-term activist fn the New Left and fn 1966-67 served as National Secretary of the Students for a Democratic Society. He fs co-author with Carol Neiman of A Disrupted Historh: The New left and t e New Capitalism (pub­lished by Random House, 1971). He is currently working on a new book , The Politics of Openness. PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD IN GAY AUSTIN ******* SEE BACK COVER FOR DETAILS ... the fullness of the h11nan experience whic~ i n­cludes the joy of the gay experi ence . One night six years ago I was driving down Nob Hill in San Francisco with my lover. It was our first night in town and we saw these two guys about sixteen years old walking down the sidewalk with their arms around each other and looking very much in love. Suddenly they just stopped in the middle of the sidewalk and put their arms around each other and 1ugged and gave each other a long kiss. And I star­ted to cry--both for joy because it ~as so incredi­) ly beautiful and for the grief of not having had that chance and couraQe and freedom when I was six-teen. - Right now I want to make up for all I missed by wit­nessing something about 200 times more beautiful than what we saw that night in San Francisco. Because I want you each to turn and hug your brother or your sister and give them a big kiss. Right now! Yeah, that's right. Right now here in our hometown in Aus­tin, Texas. And let everybody know we've come home to ourselves here today. And that we intend to stay, and that we intend to be very gay. (Editor's note: And at just that moment during the Gay Freedom Day Rally in Wooldridge Park, we all turned one to another, and gaity abounded. And it was good.) drawing by Davfd Dole .. 8 GAY AUSTIN Septenber 1978 A Gay Night By SCOTT LINO YOU FEEL that thirst. Something to slake it, to cool it down. You're thirsty and restless. You want some­thing to do. You've finished registering for classes, or maybe you late registered , or maybe you completed adds and drops, or it's the first night after class and the thought of remaining at home and attacking that Accounting textbook makes you ..• restless. You're gay. You wouldn't want to be any other way. Or you're a lesbian, and no straight frat guy's go­ing to pull his macho power trip on you. To be like the others, to emulate Silly Willy or Betty Baptist, that isn't you. You have your own life to live, and you' re determined to make 1 t good. So you're restless. You want to 111eet people. What to do, you ask, what to do. And the answer as if by ra-gi c c011es to you. · But where, you Might ask, where? This article is not, I assure you, some absurd Coke conmercial. Perhaps you've heard 1t on the radio, the Sahara Desert and all that. No, I am not some disem­bodied voice trying to sell you some Coke. I do not deal in that. Coke I am not downgrading. Far from it. Coke certainly has its place, at parties and such. But not here. To partake of this has little to do with gayness or straightness . Coke ls thus consigned to the Sahara winds. on the THIS ARTICLE will relate: 1) where to go and 2) what to do once there . But first a word on Austin. Back some years ago, sfx to be exact, I wished to attend the exalted UT. Certain people warned me 1n advance that all sorts of devilish evil things in­habited that fabled land: hippie longhairs puffing weed, dealing all sorts of drugs. Card-carryinq communists fomenting demonstrations against Nixon and a certain war. And most dreaded of all, monstrous ho-mo-sexuals seducing every young innocent in sight; these, I was told, I would have to watch out for be­cause they came in various disguises. I took my in­formants' advice quite literally. I kept my eye out. And like those people said, these homosexuals were everywhere: marching to ant1-N1xon demonstrations, advocating socialism and even smoking weed at var­ious locales while others stayed home and attacked their Accounting textbooks. I discovered Barton Springs and Hippie Hollow, and most importantly, found out that the Pearl Street Warehouse could be found nowhere on Pearl Street. Times have changed. Austin's gay bars now include the Hollywood, the Austin Country, the New Apartment, the Private Cellar, and the Tap. We shall take a quick journey to these bars. So, in line with T.S. Elliot, "let us go and make our visit. " .. g :: "' ~ ~ • "' ,.". .0. 0 "i The Austin Country: Inside and ... Outside THE HOLLYWOOD Located at 304 W. 4th St. , the Hollywood Is the place to go, particularly ff you are a woman. It ad­verti ses itself as a women 's bar, but 1f you are a man you also are cordially welcomed. This disco bar has plenty of room to dance and two levels of tabl~s to sit down and talk. It has all the atmosphere and trimmings of a rustic, down home bar with all the urban, but tastefully subdued, modernity of l 1ghts and effect. A good sound system drums the disco beat. but you never feel overwhelmed, unless you wish it. ORESS IN your denims and feel at home drinking a longneck, juice or gin-and-tonk at the bar, before which looms a barback-to-ceiling mirror that looks as 1f 1t had been there since the old days. Poten­tial friends left and right of you. The celling ls miles high and the spaces add to this feeling of laid-back comfort. Take a look at photographs of women as you enter. All you have to do ls let the mood carry you. It'll take you to good times. Or p 1 ay some poo 1 at the corner of the bar. The cover charge on weekend evenings Is good, as well, to you: 50¢ 1n these Inflationary times ls a comforting thought. Sorry, But no Coors sold here. Check this place out. It's on the up and up. Sept ember 1978 GAY PUST!~ THE AUSTIN COUNTRY The AC s till reigns as Aust in ' s most popular disco. But 1t 's more t han that. Large and spacious it de f i nitely ls with t hree main ar eas. One area com­prises the dance f l oor; expect t o wr ithe along with t he ot he r s sur rounded by "sensurround sound", which means amplified bass and big, big speakers. For your enj oyment, check out the central bar area with brown carpeted floors and an area of s teps at one wall with large pillows where you can flop after you have tired yourself out dancing. A big-screen TV lies at one corner of the pillows ff you want di vers ion . A large aquarium demarks its separation from the t hird area reserved for poo 1 freaks. When I say "pool," I don't mean a swimming pool, though that might be a good idea for later expansion . Being a disco freak myself, I have thought more than once of wishing to submerge myself 1n a pool so as to return to the dance refreshed. IF YOU DESCENO some sta1 rs to the side of the dance floor, you'll find yourself outside listening to the t...1tter1ng of birds In trees . Yeah, the patio' s a good place to cool off. Cover charge has lately been increased to $1.00 six nights a week (closed Monday), and $2.00 for after­hours Friday and Saturday nights (2 - 4:00 a.m.). Check this place out. I promise you you'll go back, barring soneeconom1c disaster. Drag shows Thursday evenings. Free beer Wednesday nights from 10 - 11:00 p.m. Other specials, too. Oh yes, you'll find 1t at the northeast corner of E. 7th St. and Red River. THE NEW APARTMENT Call it simply The Apartment, or attach the word "New" to 1t, and you arrive at the same place. You can fl nd 1 t at 29th and R1 o Grande with a large, but not always ample, parki ng lot. It looks l i ke a house with a fence fronting it (you go 1n through the back way) . At the red light , it's there, right across from the Rome Inn. An eatery called the Lous 1ana Purchase 1 ooks as 1 f 1 t were attached to the Apart­ment. No cover charge, and it's open from noon to 2:00 a.m • If you're into leather (Allstin still doesn't have a real leather bar yet), you can find like-minded and suitably attired people here. Overall, the dress is casual and fits with the dominant rough- hewn wood motif of the walls. THE BAR HAS ample sitting space and you cannot im­agine friendlier people. The two pool tables 1n a separate room are always hopping . In another room sits a juke box for those who like country-western or disco. Another room houses those who 11 ke play­ing cards, though I do wonder how anybody can see whether they're holding a three of clubs or a king of hearts in such darkness. If you want some of that good ol' Austin air, just move to the back (lr should one say, the front?) patio with your l ongneck or whatever you brought to drink. Don't worry 1f you have trouble finding parking space; you know what that means . You're destined to pass your time hm! In good cheer. Cheers. Check out happy hour 4 - 8:00 p.m. Check out other specials too n,_rous to name. continued on page 14 9 10 GAY AUSTIN Septent>er 1978 GCS: serving gay austin for 3 years By ART HORRIS GCS Peer Counseling Coordinator Tomny Connell rapping with Kelly Kay GAY COllfot.INITY SERVICES opened its doors at the University Y in Austin on August 1, 1975. But the organization was actually born across the Drag as a group of UT students who called themselves Gay People of Austin. The People moved to 2330 Guadalupe when the University Y recognized them as a viable group serving a previously ne­glected part of the Austin connunity, and offered office space in their headquarters above S011111ers Drug. A totally volunteer organization, GCS is staffed by and for the gay people of Austin and Travis County. Counseling and information services, available to both telephone and walk-in inquiries, make up the bulk of GCS' day-to-day activities. Although some of our counselors may be professional, they all function at GCS as non-professional peer counselors. relying on personal experiences and their own comnon sense in reacting to and discussing gay people's lives and problems. Many of those who call or come to GCS for peer coun­seling are gay people in the process of caning out who need to talk to someone in a non-judgmental position who understands their problem. In more complex situations, GCS operates a referral system using psychiatrists and psy.chologists screen­ed by the organization so that we know they are supportive of gay people. GCS also makes referrals to other professionals, such as dentists, doctors and l awyers . FREQUENTLY, non-gay groups are interested in having contact with gay peop.ie as a learning experience. The GCS Speakers Bureau provides speakers to any group requesting them. Frequent requests arrive from UT, St. Edward's University, Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Austin Community College,Southwestern University in Georgetown and Huston-Tillotson College. Church groups, high school classes, and local TV and radio stations have also called upon GCS for speakers. Our newspaper GAY AUSTIN has been published for over ~o years, starting out as a four page mimeographed newsletter, and gradually grow1ng 1n quality and support. Published on newsprint for nearly a year now, the paper has subscribers in Texas, California and Utah. Published mont~ly and distributed in Austin free, Gay Austin may be found at any of our advertisers' establishments, at GCS, in bookshops along the Drag, and in the Austin/Travis County Collection of the Austin Public Library. Since its inception, GCS has sponsored a Friday night Rap Group which meets at 8:00 p.m. in the GC5 lounge above Somners Drug on the Drag. A good place to meet gay people in a quiet atmosphere, the Rap Group is open to everyone. Discussion ranges from coming out to promiscuity, relationships, and whatever else the group wants to talk about. The only Austin gay organization with a permanent telephone line, GCS acts as a clearinghouse for information significant to other gay organizations including the Austin Gay Political Caucus, Austin H1.111an Rights Coalition, Austin Lesbian Feminist Organization, UT's Lesbian/Gay Alliance, Texas Gay Task Force, Lesbian/Gay Democrats of Texas and Metropolitan C011111unity Church. Pertinent infonnation is recorded on the answering tape which is available on the phone when GCS is closed. Included in the Gay canmunity Services Directory and Source Book published by the National Gay Task Force, GCS is funded by private donations, the ad­vertisers of GAY AUSTIN and the United Urban Coun­ci 1 of Austin. GAY CO~UNITY SERVICES is open daily fran 6-10 p.m. upstairs over Sonmers Drugstore at 2330 Guadalupe. The phone n1.111ber is 477-6699. September 1978 GAY AUSTIN 11 A restaurant for gay austin ____ _ By HARVEY NEVILLE Have you ever tried to enjoy an excellent dinner at a posh Austin restaurant with someone whom you are really close to (or want to be) when suddenly your stomach starts feeling queasy? It's a conmon feeling. You have realized that your wait-person is rushing you through the meal, and that most of the people around you seem to be feasting their homophobic eyes on the two of you rather than minding their own business. Want relief? GO DCMN to the Private Cellar Restaur1nt on E. 6th St tonight (unless it's Monday) and enjoy the good C0111Pany, low prices and generally well prepared food. The PC restaurant is brought to you by the same folks who run the popular bar by the same name (which is adjacent to the eatery). The restaurant has given new life to the old build­ing which the Waller Creek Catering Co. vacated a year ago. Diners can take in the sidewalk sights marching by on Sixth Street through beautiful glass doors. The dark hardwood floors, brick walls and softly lighted interior work together to produce a romantic mood. You can also enjoy dinner with a view on the back balcony which overlooks the patio behind the PC bar. GEORGE, the proprietor, opened h1s restaurant on Aug. 4, and says that business has been good. So good, in fact, that the dining hours are about to be expanded from 7 until 11:00 p.m., to 5 until mid­night. The PC restaurant is also open afterhours on Fridays and Saturdays until 4:00 a.m. Entrees range from Chef's Salad ($2.95) to Chateaubriand (for two) at $12.50. The variety of dishes and their prices compare favorably with the selection of many equally (or more) expensive res­taurants. You can depend on four standard entrees whatever day you go. In addition to the Chef's Salad and the Chateaubriand, there's Shrimp Scampi ($5.95) and Roast Pork. 00 c: .0.. u llJ ........ tJ The Balcony at the Pr1¥ate Cellar Restaurant Chef Howard also prepares three specials daily, and the diner may be offered anything from a large por­tion of Crab Newburg ($3.95), to Chicken Fried Steak. MOST SERVINGS are moderately sized and are accom­paniea by a soup and salad. Unfortunately, the veg­etables taste as if they were an afterthought, or at least forgotten while everything else cooked. The Private Cellar restaurant provides a long-awaited service for Austin's gay C011111unity. The food itself might actually take third place to the concept of a gay restaurant, and to the warm4 comfortable atmo­sphere which has been established at PC's eatery. 12 •' AUSTIN Sept!lll!r lt78 v ~~~ -~ -r ~ 6~0~ ~bo.\*>.t\, •• September 1978 GAY AUSTIN 13 ~t~~-\c \~~. ) , ·~· .: '\~().~ ~ ~ , V\o-\\~\-~\ \~ \V14ock.~ '' ~e..5o.id; .~ ~·! 1 t¥~t-~ ~1-o ~ 1 ~e.U)i'<'\Oow o..V\d ~ " --- ~ ~'(U.cii\ 'v\ \ £, \,\o.i Y'. ~';Ok- ~11'1\ ~~"°'\e.\)~a..~\o..~&.~\\~ ~ 'c~orw<O· "'~ ~ ~ ~~-"t\YA- ~~en t\\e. ""~ ~ ~V\ ~ ~--~.~"\ w..~~) ~ U.'1\(\.&~ ~\pc.'( ~\y-~ ~\u.t..- ~ ~ ~..\-'1.0«t- "'c«\ve. \"O .lr'v..e.. ~ se.o..~\"" z-o.~~') ei\\\ \ ~.\p.~i.~ ex\- ~ ~'""'~) ~ o- IJ\,c«\\Je-. c3"-"f"°~ ,borV\~ t~e. t"Ol..>f--\~\.\i; o.v-A uio..~-\n.\~o..~ . \-..v. -.911\w\~ ~t..~o~~~ ,~~\~~ 1o.MtU~~~~ ~ Q~ \.\;.s ~\e. . ... ~~~~ ~~~~~ ~~ '{ o..cov..cd~~ ~~\o~o.~~~ ...~. :.~~~ Mil\ \\,,i.e.¥, l..tli.\~ .s\c_q;>. ''"\TW,t-~v.:l ~ ~ '-1.'f> 1 ~~s \~ ""°~· \J._') e,.'l('C., t\ue, o...-\- ~v.:. ~t~ (\~~ 'o e.~~ ~ a..~lrd c~'v\'\e.5 et..\l\d. *"'~"\'s \e..CbS ~.a.YI, a...~ \\Ou.V­O.. IJJ~·; o..~we.ired -Zo...~~ '';So 'o~ C\u..\~~ou.."\ \'\.' ' p;'(,p.c,o.__ s~e:i. -S'<"C>-W\ \-\-\e.. ~o..\t..\- o...w:\. ·1\t\-\-c \,\1s \>V\~t ~~ °'- c..\o\"~ ~V\~ ~ 11-"'.e.V\ \.;.)o..\~ O\Jer A-o Zo..~'<'n.... ,\..U "-o \\o.6. o...\£:,e:. do V\ Y\ e..d. \\_\.s · '>~e).\ k Yv-.:: ~e:.. ~d.~ i-C\~es:.s \::n ts C)OJ.t."~ \:iu...s'.Y\e$ \..~ 0..\f\ "'01./\(Y 0..~ o.,\\, bu_\ I:.W\ °'Joi.~~ v.\i.~ Q u..V- V\\On\iV\~ e.~e.ro.U:e. .' • ····-··------- - 14 GAY AUSTIN Septenber 1978 A GAY NIGHT ON THE TOWN continued from page 9 The Private Cellar Restaurant Familiarity breeds carelessness but we are careful with each other tonight in strangenoiays. If you knew me better you might be hurt by my care of a stranger But tonight you are the stranger just as my lover was once a stranger. -- Arrrne Hogan THE PRIVATE CELLAR What can one say of the PC but "Wow .••• " one has to say more than that, certainly, but go down there any day at 2:00 p.m. and you'll know exactly what I mean. The cut, frosted glass at the bottom of the stairs prefigures the allure of the place. The PC's right across from the Stallion bookstore, so you can hardly miss it. It's at 709 E. 6th St., one-half block west of IH 35. The bar is both cozy and spacious, a remarkable com­bination. Lots of attractive wood tones and windows looking out upon the patio above Waller Creek. Outside, tables among the banana trees provide added comfort. After having done a look-around there, come back in and watch people playing pool at either pool table. Sip a nice cool drink and get a glimpse of Paul Lynd's signed photograph over the bar. HAPPY HOUR perpetually from 2 - 7:00 p.m. Free beers Wednesdays at 10 (remember when Wednesdays were spent listening to Brother Joe T. "Howdy" pray for the damned inside the Big Tent?), and incredibly low 10¢ draft on the pat1o Monday nights. If you get hot sipping the brew out there, just sidle inside and catch the cool air. Check this place out. Check other added inducements. Sunday at 7:00 p.m. is after-Hippie Hollow hours at the PC with free beer and hot dogs. George, the proprietor, has also opened a restaurant next door, and serves dinner daily 5 o.m. til midnight {closed Monday), and a brunch on Sunday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The PC restaurant is open afterhours (midnight til 4:00 a.m.) on Fridays and Saturdays. Sounds pretty good, if you know what I mean. Just the right atmos­phere to enjoy the r~ght food. · THE TAP The Tap? Where's that? I confess that I have yet to traverse that place, but I hear it's an extremely cozy bar with all types of interesting people. Ru­mour has it of drag shows Wednesday nights. It's in the same block as the Greenhouse at W. 36th St. and Guadalupe. This has to be "mystery locale" number one. It's time we checked it out. Meanwhile, have a good time, and enjoy while you have the energy to do so. Two for the road, and all that. CAPITAL COIN COMPANY 3004 GUADALUPE 472-1676 AN EXTENSIVE COLLECTION OF corns AND CURlfNCY ffiLD JE\f:LRY Ff{)M All OVER THE vDRLD ALSO BUYING ANTIQUES AND ALL GOLD 2CJk DISCOUNT ON GOLD JEWELRY AND COIN SUPPLIES WITH THIS AD. ;; ,I WHETHER YOU'RE a once-a-week jogger, an all-a­round jock or a professional cruiser, Austin is the place to be. Hike and bike trails almost completely encircle Town Lake (the Colorado River) from South River­side's "Apartment City" all the way to Zilker Park. One path leads from Westerfield Park (at Enfield and Mopac) south along Mopac to the river. · For shadier, more cruisy running, head for Pease Park, the verdant 14-block strip fed by Shoal Creek j ust west of Lamar Blvd. be tween 15th and 29th Streets. Long the outdoor headquarters of gay Austin, illicit activity in the bushes has cut down ince the City of Austin cleared out the underbrush a few years ago. Few swimming holes are as beautiful as Zilker Park's gigantic, spring-fed Barton Springs Pool. Women may swim topless here, and many of the straight men now sport bikinis. Although at Barton Springs only 176 lenghts equals the English Channel, serious lap swinwners stroke away at Deep Eddy Pool. off Lake Austin Blvd. a couple of blocks west of Mopac. Deep Eddy is also a spring-fed pool. Naturalists spend hot days sunning at Hippie Hollow on Lake Travis, where nudity is the accepted conven­tion. Gay C011111unity Services sponsors volleyball every Sunday at 5 p.m. in Ramsey Park (at 44th St. and Burnet Rd.). The Private Cellar provides free beer every second and fourth Sunday of the month. And just fonned is the Capital City Athletic Club, a group of gay sports enthusiasts which plans to challenge other gay athletic clubs around the state in baseball, swimming, and field sports. Call GCS at 477-6699 for information on joining. WOMEN/SPACE Is a counseling and infor­mation center lor the women of Austin. It pro­vides a variety of services for women such as walk-in counseling, legal and medical and birth­con trol information, and information about community resources. WOMEN/SPACE also coordinates rap grouPs and consciousness-rais­ing groups. Phone 472.3053. • September 1978 GAY AUSTIN 15 Running in Pease Park gay austin at play Playing volleyball with Gay C011111unity Services LE at GAL SERVICES reasonable fees The Legal Ciinlc c harges $15 for your initial cc:insultatoon s es - y . There Is no time limit . If you went or need - will aupply you with e written fee quot•­sh to go on with• case alter conaultetion ther Obllgatlon. aion with an attorne addltlonal se r v ices tlon , If you don't wl you ar• under no fur o UNCONTESTED 01 VORCE (NO PROPERTY OR CHILDREN) S 90 o UNCONTESTED 01V ORCE (WITH PROPERTY OR CHILORENI 150 I UNCONTESTED 01\IOllCE (WITH PllOPERTY &. CHILDREN) 175 •NAME CHANGE •BANKRUPTCY, INOI VI DUAL •BANKRUPTCY. HUS BAND ANO WIFE o SIMPLE WILL, INOIV I DUAL •SIMPLE WILLS, HU SBANO AND WIFE 45 225 275 40 80 The legal f-• q f- are for casea fl uoted above do not Include court coats. n­led in Travis county betw-n June 1, 1978 and Sept•mber I, 1978. F -s for legal work outside of Travi • County wlll be higher. The L clvll cases not llat eg•I Cllnie also accept• criminal cases and ed above. Pie•- call for an appoint,,_,i, No legal advice will b e given over the telephone. Hours: 9 :00 5 :0 O weekdays. Y\oleekend• and evenings~ ap­polntment. Legal Cl Vlvlan Mahlab \ inic at 501 W. 12th St. Au stin, Texu 78701 512-478-9332.~~-----J..J - •. I 16 GAY AUSTIN September 1978 weeklJ---- MONDAY­SATURDAY MONDAY TUESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SUNDAY Happy Hour at the New Apartment, 4:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. Lambda AA, 209 West 27th, 8:00p.m. Free beer, the New Apartment Lesbian rap group (open), Womenspace, 7:30 p.m. Showtime, Austin, Country, 10:30 p.m. Womenspace programs with discus­sion; coffee at 7:00 p.m., speakers at 8:00 p.m.; see weekly Rap group, Gay Community Services (open), 8:00 p.m. Happy Hour at the New Apartment, noon-.8:00 p.m. Volleyball sponsored by GCS, Ramsey'Park, West 44th at Rose­dal~, ~:~O p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Free keg of:b~er every second and fourth Sunday (donated by the Private Cellar). Come on out! After Hippy Hollow Hour, free beer and hot dogs, 7:00 p.m., Private Cellar. Metropolitan Community Church services, noon and 7:30 p.m., 614 East 6th. French Cuisin~. Courtyard, & Bar. calendar 15 -WomenSpace: Depression and Women, Jan Wetzel of the UT School of Social Work. 2330 Guadalupe, 8pm. 15 -Democratic Party State Convention, Ft. Worth. 16 -Democratic Convention continues. 17 -Texas Gay Task Force meets in Ft. Worth. Call (512) 655-3724 for details. -'Sebastiane' and 'A Very Natural Thing' screened at the Varsity Theatre, Guadalupe at 24th St. 18 -Films at Varsity Theatre (see above). 20 -GCS monthly meeting. Officers to be elected. 2330 Guadalupe, 8pm. 22 -Free VD Clinic for men and women. Club Austin, 308 W. Sixteenth St., lOpm-midnight. Sponsored by GCS, Texas Dept. of Health Resources, Private Cellar and Club Austin. -WomenSpace: Running in Austin, Kay Hart of Aus­tin Runners Club. 2330 Guadalupe, 8pm. 23 -Deadline for contributions to GAY AUSTIN. 29 -WomenSpace: Nutrition and the Politics of Food, Lynn Hayden of the Comnunity Nutrition Institute. 2330 Guadalupe, 8pm. mmwe1 1881ST8D 706L6111Streel A.U .l.!N llTIX. TBXAS Learn about our unique collection of lotions, oils, uibrators, incense, sponges, loofahs, and creams. Grow through an assortment of books on sexual enrichment, body awareness, and massage. ..... .... _ Customer Parking at ~ .......... -... 22nd&: San Antonio ________3 _1_,_E_mr 6_ 1h_ St _._ _____- -.J _.... .. ,.....=~-== _, ·-- ·~· ,._,._ .... m-A Open 8 a.m. until 2 at night. • c IN reaches a very special audience which other Austin newspapers just To mp aJtOcUh . cOllMl'ltcate with the gay cQllll.ln1ty, we will include a Classified sect on in fnure issues. As an additional service, you can retna1n anonymous and we wtll ass1tn a Box number to your ad, notifying you of all responses. All ads llUSt be submitted and patd for by the publication deadline for the iuue tn which you want your ad to appear. ock Io WneOU: LD LIKE TO PLACE A WORD MR CLASSIFIED IN THE ----ISSUE OF GAY AUSTIN. $3.00 FOR 20 WORDS, lot EACH ADDITIONAL WORD. ws D I WOULD LIKE TO PLACE AN ANONYMOUS CITY ZIP WORD CLASSIFIED IN THE ISSUE OF GAY AUSTIN. GCS WILL KEEP ~ NAME CONFIDENTIAL ANC' ~OTIFY ME TECEPHONE OF ALL RESPONSES. $4.00 FOR 20 WORDS, 154 EACH ADDITIONAL WORD. a.ASSIFIED: I I ., _J I I 1 2 4 5 I I I I 10 I 6 7 8 i 9 I I !3 I J 15 I 11 iz 14 I I I I I 16 17 18 19 20 Additional words: MAIL THIS FORM TO: GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES (Classifieds), 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Tx. 78705; or drop it off at the GCS office '9tween 6:00 and 10:00 p.m. daily.
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