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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
File 014
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 014. 1978-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/554.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-07). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 014. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/554

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 014, 1978-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/554.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date July 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript 14 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 Backstage with Anita By HARVEY MEVIIAE "And, remember Reverend, tell all of your good people to pray for the victory of repeal in Wichita and Eugene " With those words Anita Bryant ended her "testimony" at Austin's Municipal Auditorium on May 7, She then walked out of a well-protected rear exit of the building arm-in-arm with Harold O'Chester of Allendale Baptist Church. A waiting car took Bryant and her entourage to the airport; they were escorted by two city motorcycle policemen and one squad car. I had been waiting backstage at Muni three hours for an opportunity to talk with the Florida orange juice queen (it seemed like years while watching the "Church service" and her performance). Her tightly scheduled, three hour visit had prohibited a personal Interview which 1 tried arranging months in advance through her office (The Fishers of Men) in Miami. Part of me didn't want to be anywhere near or have anything to do with Bryant, her show or O'Chester's peculiar form of worship. It was as if to witness (used in the non-religious sense) their spectacle would give some validity to it. The Breakfast Festival for Human Rights was being held simultaneously down by Town Lake near the Auditorium. The one thousand happy end gay people were there sharing in something which 1, too, wanted to be a part of: a celebration of solidarity in opposing Bryant's great eagerness to deny gays and women equal rights in living their lives as they want to -- as they must. But indeed there I was in the wings of the stage at Municipal Auditorium shaking the hand of one of the world's most famous homophobes, Anita Bryant Green, before she made her first entrance. 1 had been per suaded by the voyeur in me to observe Anita in action. 1 was asking her if we could talk for a few minutes after the "service" was over, and she had agreed to a short meeting with the press. Bryant had made a point of telling me that her appearance was strictly a religious one, and in no way political, although I hadn't asked any question that protested the comment. The one-time first runner-up in a Miss America contest had arrived at about 10:00 a.m. — 45 minutes before her portion of the "service" began. One city policeman had been guarding the rear entrance to the auditorium for an hour before Bryant's arrival. But the low-key and easy-going backstage mood set by some rather disinterested lighting, sound and television technicians had altered radically when a beefy contingent of eight additional policemen came on the scene at 9:45 a.m. They checked the creditentials of anyone who (like myself) was straggling around on the stage or who did not look particularly enthralled with Reverend O'Chester's haranguing of the audience for donations. THE ARRIVAL The police received a radio message when the Bryant party was a five minute drive away from the auditorium (having arrived at the airport). The good word was given to an expectant O'Chester who had been pacing to and fro backstage whenever he left his rostrum on stage, hands tightly clasped like a nervous new father. While on stage he had managed to present a different persona -- that of the cool, collected preacher. A local television news camera team caught the scene as Anita Bryant walked in, O'Chester at her side Professional all the way (from the experience of countless orange juice commercials, no doubt), Bryant looked directly into the camera, smiling and photo by Alan Pogue
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