Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
File 012
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 012. 1978-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-07). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 012. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/552

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 012, 1978-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date July 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript JULY 1978 GAY AUSTIN their kids to school? It was better to have them driving the oxen, or with the team; working the soil; bringing firewood; bringing hay for the donkeys; taking care of the goats or the pigs; or this or that. They would say that the schools were a thing of the devil, Nowj when there are classes^ when the schools are open, the children don't go to work. But when they get out of school, their parents are there to pick them up and take them to work. Mothers take their babies to work with them, too, because they don't have enough money to have someone else take care of them. So there they ale with their bottles, in the surij in the windj exposed to poisons from the warkj to insecticides All that's very dangerous. D.M.: So if the kids don't learn anything else, they are going to spend their lives working in the fields? J.C.: Well, at most, they finish high school; but most stay to work in the fields. If ail of the food is produced by the campesinos, everything the lower classes eat and the upper classes, and all the communities, educated and not educated, then it can't end. So campesioos have to exist anyway; if we're all going to be educated and the government wants ua all to go to school, then what are all those educated people going to do? D.M.: What about technology? It is said that all of that work is going to be done by machines in the future. So what's going to happen to campesinos? J.C.: Yes, exactly. Most are going to be unemployed. One machine does what hundreds of workers can do. But many people have told us that we should go to school since the government has so many education programs, and stop going around like trouble-makers and agitators. So why are we struggling? I tell them that if education were enough to end all the exploitation, if there wouldn't be any more exploited campesinos, I'd go to school. But if I go to school and} nevertheless3 there is still exploitation for hundreds and hundreds who are out in the fields, then what good does it do for me to go to school* THEY still won't respect our opinions. Only what THEY say goes. I can't say 1 don't like this work, or that's not the right way you're doing it, can I? Just the way THEY say, that's the way it is. For example, in many states they've done away with the short hoe. ENRIQUE LOPEZ: And in Texas? Can they use the short hoe? J.C.: They've got us bowed down, and really bowed down. If the boss comes to the field and we're not bent over we're fired. E.L.: Why do they use the short-handled hoe? J.C. Well, ideas that the bosses have. They think the work is done better. Long hoes have always worked well, but the bosses don't think so. If I tell the boss or contractor I'm not going to work with a short hoe and bring my own long-handled hate from home, then they have a saw in the fields and they cut it off. And up in the northern states people say the bosses don't give them short hoes. But I tell them, don't think it's because the boss loves you so much. The boss has never loved us, all he loves is his big sack of money, that's all he wants. People don't matter to him They want to have people in stock, to have a lot of people of every type, of every age, of every size, every kind of people, Like a basketful of apples, and from it the buyer, the boss, whoever is goin' to buy that mer- chandise, he's picking out and picking out, all number one* all number one* and all the number twos and number threes he leaves there or he throws away. They're no good, according to him, because he's going to choose the best* That's the way he wants us, the people, the campesinos* No. he doesn't want to have us that way^ he has us that way, do you see? Because they pick the best and the strongest, the ones that can do a lot of work, not the weake/ ones. They want to have a lot of people so when a bunch die, or one dies, they put in ten more. One dies, they put in ten more- They want to have extra people like extra machines. They don't want to lose them, They're not going to lose, for example« ten trailers of cantaloupes, ten trailers of whatever is waiting there without ice and without being crated, so it moves, it has to be moved, D.M,: Is there a law protecting the workers from insecticides, from poisons used in the fields? J.C: The workers have none. That's why we make these marches, and make these protests, and make strikes, because the campesinos aren't protected. D.M.: So for example if a group of workers is in a field and a plane passes by spraying insecticides, what happens? J.C: No —not "for example"! They do pass and they do spray us, D.M.: They don't pay any attention to the workers? J.C: No, they don't pay any attention to us, because we don't have any laws to back us up* People have even been killed in the fields by the planes because they fly so low that even if the people lie on the ground they have been hit, D.M.: How many years have you been doing this? J.C: Well, as for being a campesino, my whole life because I don't know how to do anything else, Just farmwork. D.M.: From what age? J.C From the age of eight, which is a child's age, isn't it? I worked because we have always been very poor, my parents have always been very poor* I never went to school. I've never seen a school from the inside, just from the outside^ from the sidewalk. D.M.: Some people say you worked harder than anyone else during the march to Washington, J.C.: Well, I can't say I was the hardest worker, because who knows? For me it wasn't work at all. Although I would work here and there and then I'd cook for all the strikers and I'd distribute the newspaper I'd distribute leaflets and I'd go around to the houses and talk to the people. E.L.: Some would be marching and there would go Julio and some others distributing papers, or they'd have run forward, the marchers would pass by and they'd run again. And the rest would be just marching and marching. It's hard. J.C: For me it wasn't work since I'm used to it. I'd even go barefoot And I never got a blister, I'm used to walking around like that. Look, I think I have ehough callouses. E.L.: And a lot of people in the union would make fun of you because you're gay wouldn't they? J.C: Oh, yes. Well, no. They just „ . . they liked tcj to play with me, E.L.: And you loved it J.C: 0h; I did, yes. E.L.: But they accepted you anyway. J.C.: Oh, yes, they had no reason not to accept me. It's not against the law. E.L.: Do you think the march to Washington was a good idea even if you didn't get to talk to Carter? J.C: Well, I think It was a good idea even if he continued on oa^e 2"c
File Name uhlib_5962538_v002_n009_011_ac.jpg