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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
File 011
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 011. 1978-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/551.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-07). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 011. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/551

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 011, 1978-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/551.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date July 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 Gay and proud Julio corenb: a farmworker By DAVID MORRIS As you drive south from Austin to the valley in April, the fields and brash along the sides of the highway change by subtle steps from nearly green to green and the mesquite becomes thicker. The houses change, too, from plain symmetry and neatness in the north to richer florid schemes and less modest color in the south. And poverty, from the highway, reveals itself in poorer sides of towns as unadorned human prevalence over neatness of lawns and rigid architectural geometry. But the valley, by one measure, is not poor. Hidalgo County, whose southern border is the Mexican Border, is the richest agricultural county in Texas, the second richest in the nation. In its fertile soil grow orrege trees, grapefruit and countless types of vegetables, enough to feed millions and enough to make rich men richer. For it is by the measure of rich men that Hidalgo is rich. Like corporate feudal lords, they gather fortunes while seated in plush chairs at polished desks, breathing cool, filtered air; but fortunes in carrots and onions need more than clever business deals, a warm sun, and great holdings of fertile land. What's needed, too, are abundant human hands ta cultivate and pick and to do so cheaply. By the measure of the 70,000 agricultural workers who live there, Hidalgo is one of the poorest counties In the nation. There are efforts to build a union. With few resources beyond their own determination, a group of farmworkers led by Antonio Oren- dain has been trying to change what by now seems an almost permanent situation by organizing strikes, protests and marches. The Texas Farmworkers Union, La Union de Campesinos de Texas, has organized and helped organize many local strikes, the latest being in the onion fields, where most workers previously earned less than a dollar an hour at the rate of 35c per sack of onions. Last year, they marched 1,500 miles from their headquarters in San Juan to Washington, D.C., to speak to Jimmy Carter, Carter's refusal to listen was no major blow to people who had been run over, shot at and jailed for their efforts. An openly gay man is in the thick of the union's struggle. Small and dark, with Indian features and a recent permanent, Julio Coreno's effeminacy is one with his strength and determination. Being a campes- Ino, a farmwerker, is more his life than his occupation, as it was the life of his parents and his grandparents. Born in the Mexican state of Guanajuato, he has never been to school and speaks no English. He is sensitive and articulate on the subject of his life as a campesino and his union, and that, as It turns out, was the subject of the interview Enrique Lopez and I held with him at his home in Mercedes, Texas, on the eastern edge of Hidalgo County. Although deeply political, Julio's community has not yet politicized the subject of homosexuality, and he was reluctant to discuss it In a political interview. All the more important, then, is the obvious respect his determination and energy have worn him'among his colleagues, a respect that in itself is hardly unusual in practical situations in working-class Mexican amd Chicano communities. DAVID MORRIS: How much money do farmworkers make here in the valley? JULIO CORENO: You can't make money here, the salaries are very low. We never work forty hours a week, much less overtime because they don't want to pay time-and-a-half. D.M.: In other jobs it's only the father that works. but here in the harvests isn't it true that the whole family usually works? J.C: Everyone always works, the father, the mother, the children, everyone. They have to take them to work because you can't earn enough pay to be able to say, well, "I'll be the only one to work." D.M.: So the children don't go to school, or they go only when they can? J.C: The way we were raised, our parents didn't send us to school because there weren't any schools on the ranches, there was nothing, and even when the government started putting schools on the ranches, parents didn't send their children. Who could send photo by Enrique Lopez Camoesino Julio Coreno
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