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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
File 006
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 006. 1978-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/546.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-07). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 006. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/546

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 006, 1978-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/546.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date July 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript JULY 1978 GAY AUSTIN Courting human rights By ART MORRIS The gay men and lesbians of Eugene, Oregon are the latest to suffer the blow of the referendum. Question 51 on the ballot asked if the ordinance which protected the rights of gay men and lesbians should be repealed. The law gave protection in the areas of employment, public accomodations, and housing. It said that one's sexual orientation alone was not a reasonable cause for exclusion or discrimination. The ordinance was repealed by a 2-to-l vote. Eugene ia the fourth area in less than a year to subject gay men and lesbians and their rights to a popularity contest. Dade County, Florida was the first of the municipalities to allow the civil rights of a minority group to be decided by the majority in • popular election. As you may remember. Anita Bryant Green lent her name and energy to this event. After a four month campaign of fear and hate by the organization called "Save Our Children," that ordinance was repealed. The Dade County Coalition and the Miami Victory Party both ran tremendous campaigns aimed at educating the public. But their campaigns didn't prove strong enough to combat that most unholy alliance of Southern Baptists and conservative Roman Catholics. The referendum passed by a 2-to-l margin on June 7, 1977. The call for referenda was spearheaded last summer by various conservative, charismatic and fundamental religious and right-wing groups. St. Paul is the eity that was forced to hold the first referendum after Dade County. The St. Paul Citizens for Human Rights was formed to educate the people of the city about the referendum and about gay people. The St. Paul referendum passed by a 2-to-l margin in the April 25, 1978 election. The referendum in Wichita, Kansas marked the greateat defeat that we have had to face. The Homophile Alliance of Sedgwick County worked hard and long to educate the public; overall the ran an effective campaign. Unfortunately, they were dealing with one of the most conservative areas of the country. Liquor- by-the-drink is still a major area of controversy in Kansas. On May 9, 1978 the voters of Wichita voted 5-to-l to repeal the ordinance that protected the gay people of that city. But it was the Eugene defeat that was the greatest surprise of all of the referenda. Oregon is traditionally liberal, and Eugene ia an urban area with strong overall support for the rights of lesbians and gay men. Jerry Weller, co-chairperson of the finance committee of the Eugene Citizens for Human Rights, said "Civil rights have never been a matter of popularity. No minority ever received civil rights from a vote." Weller said that we have only the courts to look to. The E.C.H.R. win be in court to contest some of the tactics of VOICE, the conservative faction opposing the civil rights ordinance. Although their appears to be no immediate relief, groups from each of the cities are fighting in the courts on grounds that the rights of a minority group cannot be put to a popular vote—and that to do so is a violation of the constitutional rights of all people. At the question of the constitutionality of the various referenda, one is reminded of Martin Niemoeller, a Protestant clergyman. He was imprisoned for speaking out against Hitler and survived a concentration camp where 76,000 Jews and 15,000 children were slaughtered. He described how it happened: "...the Nazis ...came for the Communists, but I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist; then they came for the Jews, but I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. The they came for the trade unionists, but I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics^ but I .didn't apeak out because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me, but there was no one left to speak for me." What Pastor Niemoellor omitted is that first the Nazis came for the homosexuals and other "undesirables." But before that, they created a climate in which the escalating persecutions -- the rounding up of the "undesirables" -- would be possible, while steadily widening the devouring definition of that word, (from Gay Sunshine, with permission) In all, what the courts decide for Dade County. St. Paul, Wichita and Eugene they will decide for the whole country. The decision will initially affect the gay men and lesbians of this country, but it will ultimately affect everyone. The courts have the powert will the work of Martin Luther King and Susan B. Anthony go the way of the Dade County Coalition, the Eugene Citizens for Human Rights, the St. Paul Citizens for Human Rights, and the Homophile Alliance of Sedgwick County? Seyforth laboratories, Inc. WEIGHT REDUCTION & CONTROL mhX V am^L ^ MUSCLE DEVELOPMENT 1 ■ "t^*\ c*^1k' ENERGY SOURCES SKIN! FACIAL FITNESS r It can happen w to you! P.O.BOX 10422 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78210 512-532-1778 < SPENCE JANUARY, distributor
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